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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

2010 

Annual Town Report 




Town of Andover 

Massachusetts 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto2010ando 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



2010 ANNUAL REPORT 



^^22222^, 4 




PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Annual Report Cover- The "Andover Memorial Building" 

At a Special Town Meeting in December, 1933, voters approved that in grateful 

recognition of the war time services of Andover boys, the new auditorium, gymnasium and 

adjacent playstead be named the "Andover Memorial Building" in memory of those who 

served in World War I. Exterior work and landscaping was done in 2009 and 2010 and the 

cover photo shows the building at the re-dedication ceremony held on May 31, 2010. 



THE 

ANDOVER 

MEMORIAL BUILDING 




••••**•••* 

In December 1933, the voters of Andover 

approved the erection of this building and, 

in grateful recognition of the wartime 

services of our Andover boys during the 

"World War" (1914-1918), named it the 

Andover Memorial Building. 

This building, consisting of the auditorium, 
gymnasium and the adjacent playstead, 
was completed in 1935. 
•*•******* 

Officially rededicated May 31, 2010 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 1 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 112 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 64 

BUILDING DIVISION 64 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 66 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 65 

HEALTH DIVISION 69 

PLANNING DIVISION 72 

PLUMBING, GAS & SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 65 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 74 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 77 

DIRECTORY OF COMMITTEES & BOARDS 9 

DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEADS 14 

ELDER SERVICES DIVISION 81 

FINANCE & BUDGET 24 

ASSESSORS 24 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 25 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 26 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 26 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 126 

FIRE-RESCUE 40 

FOUNDERS' DAY 20 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL . 109 

i 

HOUSING AUTHORITY Ill 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 17 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 15 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 93 

JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 116 



MARGARET G. TO WLE FUND 116 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY . . 62 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 45 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 46 

ELECTRICAL/MECHANICAL 46 

FACILITIES SERVICES 52 

FORESTRY 50 

PARKS & GROUNDS 50 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 50 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE 51 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 35 

ANIMAL CONTROL 37 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 36 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 37 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 35 

RECORDS DIVISION 36 

TRIAD 37 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION 114 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 55 

ENGINEERING 55 

HIGHWAY 56 

SEWER 59 

SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 60 

WATER DISTRIBUTION 59 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT 57 

PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 117 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 96 

TOWN CLERK 31 

TOWN COUNSEL 34 

TOWN MANAGER 3 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES/ELECTION RESULTS 146 

VETERANS SERVICES . 91 

YOUTH SERVICES DIVISION 84 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 

www.andoverma.gov 



Dear Andover Citizens: 

It has been my sincere pleasure and honor to serve again as Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen in 2010. This past year has been one of continuing challenges, as well as some new 
opportunities. The Town continued to weather the prolonged economic downturn but not without 
some sacrifice and difficulty. The annual Budget was balanced once again through the hard 
work and cooperation of Andover' s elected and appointed officials. Yet, even in these difficult 
times, there are many positive things happening and much to be thankful for in our community. 
Here are a few notable things that occurred in 2010. 

In February, the Board of Selectmen re-appointed Buzz Stapczynski as Town Manager 
for another five-year term of office. The Board also re-negotiated the Town Manager's contract 
successfully eliminating and reducing a number of benefits that were part of previous contracts 
as well as initiating a new pay-for-performance component. Buzz has served Andover in an 
exemplary manner for over twenty years now. The Board is very happy to see him continue on 
with his tenure here in our great community. 

The Board also welcomed Dr. Marinel D. McGrath who will serve as Andover' s new 
Superintendent of Schools starting in July. 

In March, the Town completed the process of developing a Town-wide Strategic 
Information Technology Plan. This process was facilitated by a citizen committee of IT 
professionals and conducted by BlumShapiro Consultants. The Town is now in the process of 
hiring its first Chief Information Officer (CIO). This new department head will report to both 
the Town Manager and the School Superintendent and is being funded from savings adding no 
additional cost from the prior year. The CIO will be working to implement the Town's Strategic 
Information Technology Plan. Our new CIO will also facilitate the convergence of all of the 
Town's decentralized information technology functions and staff currently dispersed within 
various departments into a single Town- wide IT Department. This major reorganization will 
allow the Town to leverage enhanced efficiencies and economies of scale in order to help reduce 
IT costs and provide a greater level of service. 

I am also very happy to report that there has been significant progress in realizing a new 
1-93 Interchange. This new highway interchange has the potential to unlock hundreds of acres of 
currently landlocked and underutilized industrial land in the Lowell Junction area of town. It 
will also allow for the expansion of existing industry currently constrained by poor access to the 
interstate while adding new jobs to the area. In June, community leaders from Andover, 
Tewksbury and Wilmington completed the first draft of the land use vision for the 
redevelopment of the subject area through a Form-Based Code. This unified code will help 



facilitate more efficient land utilization, provide opportunities for increased tax revenues and 
economic development while also helping to mitigate traffic congestion and protecting abutting 
residential neighborhoods. 

In October, leaders from the three communities met with and briefed United States 
Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood on the 1-93 Tri-Town Development Project. During the 
meeting, representatives from each community reviewed project highlights and discussed their 
respective priorities for moving forward. At the end of the briefing, Secretary LaHood pledged 
his support for federal funding for the project if the three communities could ultimately come 
together on the plan. 

The Lowell Junction Interchange Task Force subsequently held several facilitated 
discussions with the Board of Selectmen and Planning Board to discuss the next steps. During 
these meetings, the Task Force identified a series of off-site mitigation measures which are 
intended to improve both pedestrian and vehicular movement in the abutting residential 
neighborhoods. On January 24, 201 1, the Board of Selectmen voted to support the inclusion of 
the latest interchange alternative depicting a tight diamond configuration, as an alternative in the 
Interchange Justification Report. In making their recommendation, the Board of Selectmen 
anticipated that off-site mitigation measures as identified by the Lowell Junction Interchange 
Task Force would be further evaluated and addressed as the Environmental Review Process 
moves forward. The Board remains optimistic that this important project will come to fruition. 

On behalf of the Board of Selectmen, I thank you for making Andover one of the best 
places to live and work in Massachusetts and in all of New England. Please continue to stay 
involved in your community, your town and your government. Your voice and participation is 
critical for a healthy and vibrant Andover. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Alexander J. Vispoli, Chairman 
Andover Board of Selectmen 



The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. 

Its legacy of democracy shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the 

treasures of nature, history, individual respect, neighborhood and learning. 

As resources and energy allow, each of these gifts from the past will be enriched in 

the present for those yet to be. 

Vision Statement of the Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 

36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 

(978) 623-8200 
www.andoverma.gov 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Andover, 

The sun rose on May 31, 2010 with the purpose of making this day truly a Memorial 
Day. Andoverites gathered in The Park in front of The Andover Memorial Building to re- 
dedicate the newly renovated exterior and landscaping which was completed to be true to the 
original 1935 design. There were speeches, songs and prayers all to call to mind that this 
building and playstead were here to "recognize the wartime services of our Andover boys during 
the World War (1914 - 1918)". It was a beautiful day befitting their service and sacrifice for our 
country. 

The official business of the Town took place in late April at the Annual Town Meeting. 
Moderator Sheila Doherty presided over fifty-five warrant articles and Town Meeting members 
approved a budget of $133,493,568. They also approved the creation of an Other Post 
Employment Benefits Trust Fund (OPEB) to begin addressing the Town's liability for health 
insurance for municipal retirees. The accrued liability for OPEB is estimated to be $245. 1M by 
the Town's actuary. Town Meeting not only approved this but it also funded it with the sum of 
$258,119.80. The acquisition of 5.3 acres of forested waterfront property on Fosters Pond was 
approved. This will add to the forty-two acres of land already in the care and custody of the 
Conservation Commission along with one hundred and seventy acres of land known as the 
Bessie Goldsmith Woodlands under the land management of AVIS. These two hundred and 
seventeen acres of open space will provide nature lovers with access to Fosters Pond and the 
many recreational opportunities it provides the community. 

Andover was designated a Green Community for achieving five clean energy 
benchmarks. This honor was awarded to only thirty-five municipalities. In order to become 
recognized as a Green Community, the Town had to adopt certain zoning policies and practices 
to encourage renewable energy uses and projects, establish a program to reduce energy use in the 
municipal buildings and agree to purchase only fuel efficient vehicles in certain cases. 

The Town's financial status received good news when Standard & Poor's Municipal 
Credit Rating Service assigned its AAA bond rating to the community. This rating is based on 
Andover' s strong financial management practices and low overall debt burden. These factors 
combined with a diverse and stable high-end economic base enable Standard & Poor's to award 
their highest investment grade bond rating. 

Throughout the year, the School Building Committee was working on the replacement of 
the Bancroft Elementary School. They arrived at a preliminary design and cost estimates for a 
680 student, K to five elementary school. A Special Town Meeting in December approved the 
$44. 7M project subject to a Proposition 214 debt exemption vote in January, 201 1. 



The year 2010 can be called the year of transitions in both political and administrative 
positions. Senator Susan C. Tucker decided to retire after twenty-one years as a State Senator 
and Representative. Her career was dedicated to serving the needs of children and families. 
Barry R. Finegold was elected to become the new State Senator. His seat as State Representative 
was won by Paul Adams. James J. Lyons, Jr. replaced Barbara LTtalien as State Representative. 
In the Spring, Paula Colby-Clements was elected to replace Deb Silberstein who retired from the 
School Committee. Selectman Jerry Stabile was re-elected but chose to step down from the 
Board in the Summer. The Selectmen voted to have former Selectman John P. Hess replace him. 

There were several administrative changes that are noteworthy. School Superintendent 
Dr. Claudia Bach retired and Dr. Marinel McGrath was appointed by the School Committee as 
the new Superintendent. Long-time Town Clerk Ms. Randall L. Hanson retired and Lawrence J. 
Murphy was appointed as the new Clerk. Joseph R. Piantedosi, Director of Plant and Facilities, 
retired in July and was retained as the Acting Director. John A. Petkus, Jr. retired as the 
Department of Public Works Director. John Bean was appointed to succeed him on an interim 
basis. 

The Virginia Cole Community Service Award was presented to Alfred A. Koch and 
Edward J. Morrissey at the Annual Town Meeting. Mr. Koch was recognized for his many years 
of faithful service to the Boy Scouts, AVIS, Andover Historical Society and the Lawrence 
History Center. Mr. Morrissey was recognized for founding the Andover Hockey League, 
coaching Little League, serving as a volunteer Firefighter, as a member of the Ballardvale 
Historic District Commission and Cornell Trust Fund, the Clan McPherson Bagpipe Band and 
retiring as the Town's long-time Postmaster. Both gentlemen epitomize the spirit of the Virginia 
Cole Community Service Award. 



As you can read, the year 2010 was one of remembrances, rededication and transition. It 
was also a year of leadership provided by the Board of Selectmen, numerous Department Heads, 
staff members and countless volunteers who serve the Town every day. Andover is a great place 
to live, to raise a family and to work because of the many hours these individuals dedicate to 
making Andover a quality community. 

It is my honor to serve as your Town Manager. 

Very truly yours, 



" Reginald S. Stapczynskr^ 
Town Manager 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Mission & Values Statement 

Developed by the 

Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and Town Department Heads 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen on October 6, 2003 



The mission of the Town of Andover is to ensure the safety, education, and well-being of the 
community; to be a leader in the delivery of efficient and effective quality services that respond to 
community needs; to promote the continuous improvement of staff skills and performance; to 
encourage an environment of trust; to respect cultural and economic diversity; and to preserve the 
historic character of the community. 

The Board of Selectmen, as the chief policy makers for the Town of Andover, Massachusetts, 
will provide leadership in advancing the following primary and supporting values: 



Value 1 - Ensure the safety, education, 
and well-being of the community 

1 . 1 Protect the safety of persons and property 

1 .2 Maintain the high quality of education 
for all 

1.3 Maintain the Town's infrastructure 

1 .4 Promote public health programs and 
awareness 

1 .5 Manage the impact of non-municipal 
public utilities 

1 .6 Support human/community services 

1.7 Ensure compliance with regulatory 
requirements 

1.8 Identify and promote economic 
opportunities 

Value 2 - Be a leader in the delivery of 
efficient and effective quality services 
that respond to community needs 

2.1 Deliver innovative municipal services 

2.2 Encourage cost saving initiatives 

2.3 Assess and prioritize community needs 

2.4 Maintain the Town's "Aaa" bond rating 

Value 3 - Promote the continuous 
improvement of staff skills and 
performance 

3.1 Recruit, develop, and retain a highly 
skilled workforce 



3.2 Promote and recognize municipal 
professionalism 

3.3 Measure, evaluate, and improve 
performance 

Value 4 - Encourage an environment of 
trust and honesty 

4.1 Uphold high ethical standards 

4.2 Value teamwork and cooperation 

4.3 Promote open communication with the 
public 

4.4 Solicit citizen participation 

4.5 Recognize the outstanding contributions 
of citizens 

Value 5 - Respect cultural and 
economic diversity 

5.1 Promote diversity in the workforce and 
community 

5.2 Provide services that are accessible, fair, 
and equitable 

5.3 Support housing alternatives 

Value 6 - Preserve the historic 
character of the community 

6. 1 Celebrate Andover' s unique heritage 

6.2 Protect and acquire open space 



The Andover Vision 

As citizens of Andover, we are grateful to those in the past who nurtured the attractive, well managed, and 
vibrant town that we enjoy today. At the same time, we are mindful of our current stewardship and the fragile 
nature of much that we cherish. We have confidence that the most promising approach to the future is to 
acknowledge and act upon the values that we share. This is our Vision and our hopes and commitments for the 
Andover of the future. Vision 21 Committee - July 26, 2004 



QUALITY EDUCATION 

We will offer a rich and challenging public education that 
builds essential skills and knowledge that support a broad range 
of academic and vocational options, enable successful 
participation in our society and culture, and sustain curiosity 
and learning in a world of new and ever changing 
opportunities. We will cultivate the public library as a resource 
for lifelong learning and enrichment and as facilitator for the 
flow of information throughout the community. We will find 
ways to protect the quality of these institutions through 
fluctuating economic cycles. 



FINANCIAL STABILITY 

We will follow prudent financial practices that balance 
consistent high-quality services, private vs. public 
responsibility, stable tax rates, and responsible levels of debt. 
We will set ambitious goals but live within our means. In 
making financial decisions, we will include an understanding of 
long-term costs and consequences, particularly to the 
environmental integrity of the Town. We will consider 
regional partnerships that offer more effective and economical 
options, and we will manage the impact of our decisions on 
property values relative to similar communities. 



OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 

We will continue to acquire and protect open space as a crucial 
natural resource that helps to maintain the character of the 
town, offers access to both active and passive recreation, and 
provides an important natural system for water recharge, flood 
control, and wildlife habitat. 



HEALTHY AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT 

We will protect public health and safety through careful 
monitoring and enforcement of environmental, health, and 
safety regulations and by continuing to provide effective and 
responsive fire and police protection and beneficial public 
health services. 



VIBRANT DOWNTOWN 

We will maintain our downtown as an attractive and vibrant 
center with a mix of commercial and public activities, historical 
elements, and parks. We will use permits, zoning guidelines, 
and planning approvals to attract and keep pedestrian-friendly 
street-level enterprises. 

SMALL-TOWN CHARACTER 

Even as the Town continues to grow, we will actively seek to 
identify and preserve those elements — town layout and scale, 
central focus, community-wide activities, respect for historical 
structures, and residential mix that give Andover its small-town 
character. 

CITIZEN PARTICIPATION 

We will govern ourselves in a manner that encourages 
participation by all, that consistently provides adequate 
information for making informed choices, and that acts to 
preserve our investment and the interests of the community as a 
whole. We will acknowledge the needs of others and consider 
compromises that are in the best interest of the Town and 
region. 



MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

We will manage and protect our natural resources, particularly 
water, in a manner that acknowledges our responsibility to 
future generations and to other communities that share those 
resources. We will monitor air quality and take measures to 
mitigate negative effects of emissions from vehicles, regional 
incinerators, and industrial facilities. 

TOWN SERVICES 

We will provide effective and efficient services that build and 
maintain Town infrastructure, handle Town business, and assist 
citizens. We will use technology to facilitate interdepartmental 
communication and efficiency, and to provide public access to 
Town information. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Through our department of community services, other Town 
programs, and religious institutions, we will sponsor services 
and programs, facilities, outreach, and recognition to veterans, 
seniors, youth, and the disabled or disadvantaged among us. 
We will foster connections among all citizens to help us to 
appreciate, learn from, and support one another. 



HISTORICAL HERITAGE 

We will maintain strong and consistent zoning that protects 
historic buildings and places, and we will support the 
institutions that protect and promote Andover's historical 
heritage. 

CULTURAL DIVERSITY 

We will be respectful of Andover's many races, ethnicities, 
religious beliefs, and lifestyles. We will facilitate public 
events that celebrate diversity and provide opportunities for 
sharing cultural traditions. As a community, we will not 
tolerate acts of hatred or persecution. 



TRANSPORTATION 

We will monitor changing commuting patterns and side-effects 
on air and water quality, noise, and traffic. We will work 
within the region to strengthen opportunities for regional 
transit, rail travel, commuter buses, and improved connections 
with mass transit hubs. We will seek solutions to local needs 
for downtown and commuter parking, for safe and efficient 
traffic flow, and for shuttle service to local facilities and 
services. We will encourage foot and bicycle travel as an 
alternative to automobiles, whenever feasible. 



Results Summary 

2008 Andover Citizens Survey 



Community Life Summary 

Andover is rated as an excellent place to live and 
raise children, with 97% and 96% of respondents 
rating the town as excellent or good in these two 
categories respectively. Overall quality of life 
received a 90% excellent/good rating. The areas of 
weakness appear to be shopping and dining (40% 
rate this as fair), and place to retire (54% rate this 
as fair or poor). In addition, a quarter of 
respondents indicated they were unsure about 
quality of Andover as a place to retire. 

Andover receives high marks for safety and 
appearance, with 96% of respondents rating it as 
excellent or good in terms of feeling safe, and 90% 
rating its overall appearance as excellent or good. 
Public transportation and range of housing options 
received the lowest overall ratings. Violent crime is 
not perceived as a problem in Andover, with 76% 
of respondents strongly disagreeing and 19% 
somewhat disagreeing it's an issue of concern. On 
the other hand, property crime and vandalism 
(though not graffiti) are seen as more relevant 
problems in the community. Overall, most of the 
potential problems that respondents were asked 
about did not seem to be major issues of concern. 
The one exception to this generalization appears to 
be automobile speeding, where half of the 
respondents strongly or somewhat agreed that this 
is a problem issue. 

Andover' s public schools are seen as one of the 
most attractive features of the community, with 
three quarters of the respondents rating it as 
essential or very important in their decision to 
move to and/or stay in Andover. Town services, 
location, and property values were also rated as 
extremely important in attracting respondents to 
Andover and keeping them here. 

There is a strong consensus that Andover' s stock 
of single family housing is appropriate for the 
community, with 85% rating it as just about right. 
Opinion on the amount of multi-family and rental 
housing is more divided, with approximately 20% 
of residents feeling there is too much of these types 
of housing, and another 20% feeling there is not 



enough. Only 1% of residents feel there is too 
much open space/farmland, while a substantial 
number (40%) feel there is not enough of this type 
of property in Andover' s current mix. 

Local Government Summary 

Andover is a town where levels of voting and 
community engagement are high. In terms of civic 
and community participation, voting rates are 
much higher than rates of attendance at Town 
Meeting. Almost 90% of respondents said they had 
voted at least once in the past twelve months, while 
only 40% claimed to have attended the Annual 
Town Meeting. In a separate question, 43% of 
respondents reported attending Town Meeting at 
least once in the past three years. In addition, large 
numbers of residents attend town events (76%), 
donate money to local groups (78%), and shop in 
the downtown district (95%) at least once a year. 

Most of the Town's services were ranked 
positively, with nearly all being rated at excellent 
or good by at least 70% of survey respondents. 
Superior services (with excellent/good scores in the 
90+ range) were: schools, police, fire, EMS, trash 
collection, recycling, library services, parks, and 
handicapped access. Services that received less 
positive ratings were: street repair/maintenance, 
sidewalk maintenance, public parking availability, 
and public transportation, which were ranked as 
fair or poor by 45-50% of citizens. 

Contact with town officials was rated very 
positive, with 85% of survey respondents ranking 
their experience as excellent or good across all 
criteria. 

The Andover Townsman and word of mouth are the 
primary sources of local news and information for 
residents, with over 80% of residents reporting 
they use these sources at least occasionally to keep 
up on local town news. Electronic media, including 
newspaper websites, the town website, other 
websites or blogs, local access television, and 
email networks, were less frequently used by 
respondents as a source of local news. 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Community Development Plan 



Background - In January 2000, the Governor issued 
Executive Order 418 providing cities and towns with 
$30,000 to create a Community Development Plan (CDP) 
to address the state's critical housing need while 
simultaneously balancing economic progress, 
transportation issues and open space preservation. The 
CDP's purpose is to encourage people to think about what 
is best for the whole community now and in the future. 
The Department of Housing and Community Development 
approved Andover's CDP in December 2004. As a result, 
Andover continues to be eligible for state funding and 
competitive grants. The Town will also use the Plan's 
conclusions to update the corresponding four sections in 
the 1992 Master Plan. 

Introduction - The Town of Andover is faced with 
several challenges: 1) Housing has become less affordable 
for those who want to live and work, or simply to remain, 
in Andover; 2) Andover must remain economically 
competitive to maintain a stable tax base; 3) Limited 
funding and the continuous development of substandard 
parcels impede the preservation of open space; and 4) 
Residential, commercial, and industrial development at the 
local and regional levels has dramatically increased traffic. 
The foundation of the CDP is the Andover Vision 
Statement. The Vision provides a framework for decision- 
making by Town officials and citizens. Where elements of 
this Plan differ from the Vision, implementation must 
involve balance and compromise, weighing the various 
inputs according to their proportionate value. 

Economic Development Element - Andover has a 
strong local economy that was created through properly 
designed land uses, strong planning, and good positioning. 
In order to be competitive in the changing economy, it is 
recommended that the Town proceed with the following 
economic strategies: 1) Create a new management and 
marketing organization or committee that focuses on local 
business interests while utilizing the marketing skills of 
regional organizations; 2) Consider adopting zoning bylaw 
amendments that encourage a diverse mix of high 
quality/low impact industries and allow the development 
and redevelopment of existing parcels; 3) Improve 
infrastructure and programs that create access to industrial 
land and reduce congestion on local roads; and 4) Seek 
partnerships with Andover's business community. 

Housing Element - Over time, the enhanced economy 
has provided a tax base that created first-rate town 
services, including a high-quality school system, and 
funding for open space preservation. The result is 
increased demand for the remaining land. Housing costs 
have outpaced the region and the nation over the past ten 
years. Due to Andover approaching its build out, greater 
care is needed in planning for future land development. 
Unless measures are taken to protect and increase 



Andover's housing supply, there is a danger that people 
who were raised here and who work here, will no longer 
be able to afford Andover. The solution is coordinated 
expansion of opportunities for different market segments, 
gradually reducing pressure and opening new options. 
Suggested recommendations: 1) Keep designated 
affordable housing units in perpetuity; 2) Provide outreach 
to seniors and encourage elderly housing developments; 3) 
Establish a housing trust fund; and 4) Encourage zoning 
bylaw regulations that reuse old, industrial buildings for 
residential uses, maintain a mix of housing stock, preserve 
neighborhoods and promote new development to be 
moderate in scale. 

Open Space Element - The value of land in Andover 
has become so high; almost every parcel now in private 
hands is vulnerable to housing or commercial development 
within the next few decades. The need to protect critical 
open space areas is necessary to protect Andover's small 
town character, provide recreational opportunities, and 
continue wise management of natural resources. Suggested 
recommendations: 1) Acquire undeveloped portions of 
watershed or protect it through regulations; 2) Encourage 
developers to design subdivisions that protect critical areas 
and provide open space parcels and connections to 
conservation land; 3) Establish alternative linkages and 
trails; 4) Develop a management plan for town-owned 
conservation properties, and budget annually for 
maintenance of conservation areas; 5) Encourage volunteer 
efforts to promote proper use and maintenance whenever 
possible; and 6) Seek funding mechanisms to assist in 
continued acquisition of prioritized undeveloped land. 

Transportation Element - Andover's transportation 
system supports businesses and residences and connects 
Andover to neighboring towns and the regional interstate 
system. Although Andover has an excellent road system, 
there are issues that need attention. Over time, commercial, 
industrial, and residential development has increased the 
number of vehicles and the frequency of use into 
unaccustomed neighborhoods. Suggested recommend- 
ations: 1) Support high-speed transit systems that will link 
Andover with other areas of the Commonwealth and New 
England; 2) Support improvement of the Merrimack 
Valley Regional Transportation Authority's flexible design 
service along with expansion of days and hours of service; 
3) Repair or replace the inadequate bridges; 4) Increase 
bicycle use by providing a range of options; 5) Improve 
access and management of the River Road and Dascomb 
Rd. areas to create more efficient traffic flow and allow 
existing industrial land to be effectively developed; 6) 
Promote zoning and land use regulations that are 
consistent with the region's transportation goals; and 7) 
Build new access from 1-93 to Burtt Road and Lowell 
Junction to allow existing industrial land to be developed 
and decrease vehicle trips on neighborhood roads. 




w «K»iiifi5in^** 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2010 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Alex J. Vispoli, Ch. 
Mary K. Lyman 
Brian P. Major 
Ted E. Teichert 
John P. Hess 



ELECTED 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




2013 


Dennis F. Forgue, Ch. 


-2011 


2011 


Ann W. Gilbert 


-2012 


2012 


Richard J. Collins 


-2013 


2012 


David A. Birnbach 


-2012 


2011 


Paula Colby-Clements 


-2013 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James A. Cuticchia, Ch. -2014 

Francis A. O'Connor - 2015 

Janice Burkholder -2013 

Daniel T. Grams -2011 

Calvin A. Deyermond* - 201 1 

* Appointed by Cabinet Secretary of Executive 
Office of Communities and Development 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL 
SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawrence - 201 1 
Marilyn M. Fitzgerald, Andover - 2012 
Erica Max, Methuen - 201 1 

Richard Hamilton, Jr., Lawrence - 201 1 
Pamela Neilon, Lawrence - 201 1 

Thomas Grondine, Methuen - 201 1 

John Driscoll, North Andover - 201 1 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Earl G. Efinger, Ch. 
John H. Atchison, Jr. 
Deborah K. Moscal 
Donna C. Ellsworth 
Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 
Rev. Jeffrey S. Gill 
Rev. Tom McMillan 
Rev. John Zehring 



2012 
2012 
2012 
2012 
2012 



TOWN MODERATOR 

Sheila M. Doherty 



-2011 



CORNELL FUND TRUSTEES 

Calvin G. Perry -2013 

Elefterios (Ted) J. Georgian - 2012 
Richard J. Bowen -2011 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE* 



TOWN YARD TASK FORCE 



Joanne F. Marden, Ch. 


-2012 


Paul J. Salafia, Ch. 


-2011 


S. Jon Stumpf 


-2013 


Richard S. Feldman 


-2011 


Richard T. Howe 


-2011 


William T. Bride, Jr. 


-2011 


Cynthia J. Milne 


-2011 


Stephen E. Cotton 


-2011 


Paul Fortier 


-2011 


Norman J. Viehmann 


-2011 


Margaret N. Kruse 


-2012 


David O. Nelson 


-2011 


Mark Merritt 


-2013 


David J. Wahr 


-2011 


Mary O'Donoghue 


-2013 


Joseph R. Piantedosi 


-2011 


* Appointments made by the Town Moderator 


Paul Materazzo 


-2011 


PLANNING BOARD 




PRESERVATION COMMISSION 




Joan H. Duff, Ch. 


-2014 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2012 


John J. McDonnell 


-2013 


Craig D. Gibson 


-2013 


Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 


-2013 


Arnold W. Dyer, Jr. 


-2013 


Linn N. Anderson 


-2014 


James S. Batchelder 


-2012 


Mark J. Yanowitz 


-2012 


Leslie A. Frost 


-2011 


James D. Doherty, Jr. - Assoc. 


Member -2014 


Leo M. Greene 


-2013 


AUDIT COMMITTEE 




DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 




Paul C. Dow, Ch. 


-2013 


Craig D. Gibson, Ch. 


-2011 


Robert E. Finneran 


-2012 


Anita M. Renton 


-2013 


Steven G. Caron 


-2011 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2013 


Steven S. Sintros 


-2012 


Suzanne L. Korschum 


-2011 


Kathleen 0. Sherman 


-2011 


Eric I. Daum 


-2012 


MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMM. 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2011 


Maurice Desruisseau, Ch. 


-2012 


Carolyn A. Fantini 


-2013 


George J. Cordina 


-2012 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2012 


Neil B. Magenheim 


-2012 


Matthew L. Russell 


-2013 


Barbara D. Morache 


-2012 


Mark N. Spencer 


-2012 


Raymond Tode 


-2012 


Ann Handley 


-2011 


Martin J. Belscher 


-2012 


BALLARD VALE FIRE STATION BLG. COMM. 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Donald D. Cooper, Ch. 




Daniel S. Casper, Ch. 


-2011 


-2011 


James T. Curtis 


-2011 


Alexander Driscoll 


-2012 


George Thomson 


-2011 


Floyd S. Greenwood 


-2011 


Michael Igo 


-2011 


Michael Walsh 


-2012 


John J. Kiely 


-2011 


Gail L. Ralston 


-2012 


Dena L. Carbone 


-2011 


Kevin J. Porter 


-2013 


Rebecca A. Backman 


-2011 


Jon M. Honea 


-2013 



10 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Candace Martin, Ch. 


-2013 


Dennis M. Adams 


-2012 


Katherine Y. Kellman 


-2011 


David A. Billard 


-2013 


Dr. Donald Miller 


-2012 


Lewis C. Trumbore 


-2012 


ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 




COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 




Stephen D. Anderson, Ch. 


-2011 


Madelaine St. Amand, Acting Ch. 


-2012 


Carol C. McDonough 


-2013 


Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 


-2013 


Nancy K. Jeton 


-2012 


Gilbert DeMoor 


-2011 


Lynne S. Batchelder 


-2013 


Patricia A. Commane 


-2011 


David W. Brown 


-2011 


Bernadette L. Lionetta 


-2013 


Rachel Baime - Associate Member 


-2013 


Jami G. Cope 


-2013 


Shelley Ranalli - Associate Member 


-2012 


Julie E. Pike 


-2013 


Christopher J. Matey - Assoc. Member 


-2011 


Ruth A. Rosensweig 


-2011 


Phillip L. Boness - Associate Member 


-2012 


Stephen W. Surette 


-2011 


SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 




HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 


Mark B. Johnson, Ch. 


-2011 


Lelani B. Loder, Ch. 


-2011 


Francine Goldstein 


-2011 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2011 


Dr. Marinel McGrath 


-2011 


Vinod K. Bhandari 


-2013 


Joseph R. Piantedosi 


-2011 


Evan G. Belansky 


-2011 


Annie W. Gilbert 


-2011 


Jonathan D. Fuller 


-2011 


Thomas R. Deso 


-2011 


Williams S. English 


-2011 


Joseph J. Reilly 


-2011 


Edward J. Smith 


-2012 


BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMM. 


CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Denise J. Johnson, Ch. 




James L. Sheldon, Ch. 


-2013 


-2011 


Diane R. Derby 


-2011 


Donald W. Robb 


-2012 


Ronald J. Abraham 


-2012 


Linda A. Kirk 


-2013 


Madelyn I. Mitton 


-2012 


Judith T. Farzan 


-2011 


Leo M. Greene 


-2012 


Shelley S. Selwyn 


-2011 


Sherry E. Kirby 


-2011 


Kathy S. Abisso 


-2011 


David J. Hart 


-2013 


Susannah W. Abbott 


-2013 


Jessica L. Roberts - Alternate Member 


-2012 


Leslie Seaton Malis 


-2013 


RECYCLING COMMITTEE 




SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 


Keri L. Stella, Acting Ch. 


-2012 


Dr. Paul F. Caselle, Ch. 


-2011 


Scott D. Stecher 


-2011 


John S. Bigelow 


-2011 


Alanna M. McKee 


-2013 


Arthur H. Richter 


-2012 


Donald H. Gottfried 


-2007 


Sandra L. Dearborn 


-2013 


Eleanor A. Storch 


-2013 


Jennifer B. Smith 


-2013 


HOUSING TRUST FUND TRUSTEES 


SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTE 





Joan Duff, Ch. 
Linda A. O'Connell 
Carolyn Hall Finlay 
Janice Burkholder 
Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Charles W. Wolf 



-2013 
-2013 
-2013 
-2013 
-2012 
-2012 



David J. Reilly -2011 

Rosalie F. Konjoian - 201 1 

Dr. Eric Stubenhaus - 20 1 1 

JanisJ. Hill -2011 

Elizabeth M. Roos* -2011 
* Superintendent of Schools Appointee 



11 



GREEN ADVISORY BOARD 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 



Gregory M. Sebasky, Ch. 


-2012 


Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. 


-2011 


Patricia C. Russell 


-2012 


Veterans Services Agent Michael Burke 


-2011 


Iric L. Rex 


-2012 


Fire Chief Michael B. Mansfield 


-2011 


Melanie A. Cutler 


-2011 


John J. Lewis 


-2011 


Girish S. Rao 


-2013 


Robert S. Hamilton 


-2011 


Brian 0. Salazar 


-2013 


James F. Bedford 


-2011 


Joanna L. Reck 


-2013 


Susan W. Ratyna 


-2011 


Jonathan C. Unger 


-2012 


Stephen H. Wallingford 


-2011 


R. Jamieson Waldinger 


-2013 


R. Scott Parrish 


-2011 


Anil V. Navkal 


-2011 


Calvin G. Perry 


-2011 


TRIAD COUNCIL 




COUNCIL ON AGING 




Richard Tyler, Ch. 


-2012 


Jo-Ann M. Deso, Co-Ch. 


-2012 


Ethel A. Olsen 


-2012 


Donald W. Robb 


-2013 


John L. Howard, Jr. 


-2012 


AnnM. O' Sullivan 


-2012 


Nancy A. Bailey 


-2012 


Vincent P. Cottone 


-2012 


Dorothy L. Bresnahan 


-2012 


Mary Jane Bausemer 


-2011 


Deborah A. LaPointe 


-2012 


Mary L. Ryan 


-2011 


Mary Joyce Kernan 


-2012 


Emily S. Kearns 


-2011 


Russell D. Ouellette 


-2012 


Katherine E. Grondin 


-2012 






Tracey M. Meech 


-2013 


CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 




Kathleen M. Devanna 


-2011 


Zeff Marusich 


-2012 


Ann M. Grecoe 


-2013 


John B. Flynn 


-2013 


Stuart C. McNeil 


-2013 


LOWELL JCT. INTERCHANGE TASK FORCE 


TOWLE FUND TRUSTEES 

Christopher S. Doherty, Ch. 




Christian C. Huntress, Ch. 


-2011 


-2013 


Kerry P. O'Kelly 


-2011 


John J. Cronin 


-2012 


Dorie A. Resnik 


-2011 


Jane Morrissey 


-2012 


Beth A. Niemi 


-2011 






BOARD OF REGISTRARS 




ELDERLY TAX AID COMMITTEE 




Ronald C. Hajj 


-2012 


David J. Reilly, Ch. 


-2011 


Gregory J. Rigby 


-2011 


Michael Burke 


-2011 


William T. Downs 


-2013 


Klaus B. Lasch 


-2011 


INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 




VETERANS SERVICES AGENT 




Richard D. Lindsay, DVM 


-2011 


Michael Burke 


-2011 


DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 


KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 




Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 


-2011 


Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 


-2011 


GR. LAWRENCE COMM. ACTION COUNCIL 


GR. LAWR. SANITARY DISTRICT 

Morris B. Gray, Jr. 


REP. 


Judith M. Yelle 


-2012 


-2011 


MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 




FOREST WARDEN 





Katherine K. O'Neil 



2013 



Fire Chief Michael B. Mansfield 



2011 



12 



MERR. VALLEY REG. TRANSIT AUTHORITY MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 

John J. McDonnell, Alternate Member - 201 1 



Planning Director Paul T. Materazzo 


-2011 


Senior Planner Lisa Schwarz, Alternate 


-2011 


CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT BOARD 


James A. Cuticchia, Ch. 


-2011 


Robert J. 0' Sullivan 


-2011 


Elena M. Kothman 


-2014 


Anthony K. Stankiewicz, Esq. 


-2011 


Rodney P. Smith, Ex-Officio 





13 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Community Development & Planning Department 
Health Director 
Planning Director 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Community Services Director 

Elder Services Director 

Emergency Management Director 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 

Fire Chief 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Acting Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Acting Director 
Highway Superintendent 
Superintendent of Water & Sewer Distribution 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Assistant Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Assistant Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Assistant Town Manager 

Veterans Services Agent 

Youth Services Director 



Thomas G. Carbone 

Paul T. Materazzo 

Robert J. Douglas 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Paul J. Kennedy 

Michael M. Marcoux 

Mary L. Montbleau 

Katherine D. Urquhart 

Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

David A. Billard 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

Michael B. Mansfield 

Candace A. Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Edward S. Ataide 

Randy H. Pickersgill 

Ralph D. Knight 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. James D. Hashem 

Steven S. Bucuzzo 

Christopher M. Cronin 

Morris B. Gray 

Brian W. Moore 

Beth Mazin 

Dr. Marinel D. McGrath 

Rodney P. Smith 
Theodora K. Moccia 

Lawrence J. Murphy 
Kathleen F. McKenna 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Steven S. Bucuzzo 

Michael Burke 

William D. Fahey 



14 



HOW TO REACH YOUR FEDERAL & STATE ELECTED OFFICIALS 



United States Senators: 

The Honorable Scott P. Brown (R) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, 15 New Sudbury Street, Boston, MA 02203 

617-565-3170 

317 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-4543 

www. scottbro wn. senate.gov 



The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin ! 

617-565-8519 

2 1 8 Russell Senate Office Building - 2 nd Floor, Washington, DC 205 1 



One Bowdoin Square, 10 th Floor, Boston, MA 021 14 



202-224-2742 
www.Kerry.senate.gov/contact/email.cfm 

United States Representative: 

The Honorable Niki S. Tsongas (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01 852 

978-459-0101 

1607 Longworth HOB, Washington, DC 20515 

202-225-3411 

askniki@mail.house.gov 

State Senator: 



Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

State House, Room 424, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

617-722-1612 

BanT.finegold@masenate.gov 



State Representatives: 



Paul Adams (R) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District (Andover Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9) 

State House, Room 3 9, Boston, MA 02 1 3 3 

617-722-2014 

Paul.adams@mahouse.gov 

James J. Lyons, Jr. (R) 

Eighteenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 1 , 7 & 8) 

State House, Room 39, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2014 

James.lyons@mahouse.gov 

15 



HOW TO REACH THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Board of Selectmen: 



Alex J. Vispoli, Chairman 
7 Alison Way 
978-475-7661 
avispoli@andoverma.gov 



Mary K. Lyman, Vice Chairman 
50 School Street 
978-470-2685 
mlyman(S>andoverma.gov . 



Brian P. Major 
1 1 Odyssey Way 
978-470-3428 " 
bmaior@andovenTia.gov 



Ted E. Teichert 
5 Dufton Road 
978-475-1087 
tteichert@andoverma.gov 



John P. Hess 

145 Chestnut Street 

978-470-0806 

ihess@andoverma.gov 



16 



* * 



HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 



Mailing Address: Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 

Business Hours at the Town Offices: 8:30 A.M. -4:30 P.M. Monday -Friday 

(Comm. Dev. & Planning - 8:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.) 
Telephone Numbers: 

POLICE/FIRE-RESCUE - EMERGENCY 9 1 1 

Fire-Rescue - Business 978-623-8466 

Police Department - Business 978-475-04 1 1 

Town Manager 978-623-8225 

DCS Classes & Activities 978-623-8273/8274 

Department of Public Works 978-623-8350 
Department of Public Works - Highway Division 978-623-8426 

Human Resources Office 978-623-8530 

Memorial Hall Library 978-623-8400 

Senior Center 978-623-8321 

Superintendent of Schools 978-623-8501 

Andover's Home Page: http://www.andoverma.gov 

Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: http://www.mhl.org 

Andover's Population: 32,667 

Square Miles: 32 

Number of Acres: 19,900 

272 parcels totaling 1,953.33 acres controlled by the Conservation Commission 

1,200 acres owned by A.V.I. S. 

889 acres owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 

Town Meeting and Election: Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. 

Annual Town Meeting is generally held four weeks 
following the Town Election. 

Voter Registration Information: Call Town Clerk's Office at 978-623-8255 

Andover's Tax Rate: $ 1 4. 1 2 - Residential and Open Space 

$22.46 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 

When are Taxes Due: Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 

August 1 st - November 1 st - February 1 st - May 1 st 

17 



Excise Tax Information: Call the Assessor's Office at 978-623-8264 



Recycling Information: 
Questions: 



Call the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 ext. 515 



Curbside Pick-up: 



Every other week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup 
day. Single Stream recycling is now available. Recyclable 
material inclusive of glass (all colors, steel & tin cans, aluminum 
containers and #1 through #7 plastics. Recyclable paper products 
include: newspapers, magazines, junk mail, office paper, 
paperboard (cereal & cracker boxes - liners removed) and 
corrugated containers. Cardboard - please break down, flatten and 
fold boxes, cartons & other pieces of cardboard into 2'x2'xl' 
bundles - then tie or tape them together and place next to your bin. 



Complaints/Information: Call Integrated Paper Recyclers at 1-800-933-3128, the 

Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 ext. 515 or e-mail at 

dpw-business@andoverma.gov . 



Compost Site: 



Bald Hill Compost Site - High Plain Road. Permit is required for 
the disposal of leaves, grass clippings and green garden waste or to 
pick up compost. Clippings must be removed from container used 
to transport for dumping. Fines will be assessed for illegal 
dumping. Please visit www.andoverma.gov/compost for the days 
and times site is open, how to obtain a permit, the fees and the 
permit requirements for use of the site or call the Plant & Facilities 
Department at 978-623-8280. 



Trash Collection Information: 



Curbside Pickup : 



Every week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup day. 
Household rubbish is limited to 4 bags or barrels or the equivalent 
of 135 gallons maximum per residence. One bulky item is allowed 
per week in addition to household trash. 



Complaints or Inquiries: 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: 



Call Allied Waste Republic Services at 1-800-442-9006, 
the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 ext. 515 
or e-mail at dpw-business(S)andoverma. gov . 

Appliances can no longer be left curbside - their disposal is 
the homeowner's responsibility. A list of private disposal 
options may be found in the "Recycling and Trash Guide 
for Residents" at www.andoverma.gov . 



Pothole or Snow Removal Complaint: Call the Highway Division at 978-623-8426 



18 



Pothole Claims: 



Must submit a letter to the Town Manager's Office within thirty days of 
the date of the incident attaching copies of invoices for expenses incurred 
or contact the office at 978-623-8225 with any questions. 



Where to Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 



Ballfield Permits & Rentals 

Birth Certificate 

Building Permits 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electrical) 

Business Certificate 

Compost Site Permit 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fields Rental 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 



Liquor License (Annual or One-Day) 

Marriage License 

Open Air Burning Permit 

Passports 

Smoke Detector Permit 

Street Opening Permit 
The Park Rental 
Town House Rental 
Zoning Bylaw Variance 



Facilities Coordinator 
Town Clerk's Office 
Building Division 



978-623-8450 
978-623-8255 
978-623-8301 



(Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 



Building Division and 
Town Clerk's Office 

Plant & Facilities Dept. 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Town Clerk's Office 

Health Division 

and/or 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Fire Department 

Town Clerk's Office 
Fire Department 

Dept. of Public Works 

Town Manager's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Building Division 

and/or 

Board of Appeals Office 



978-623-8301 
978-623-8255 

978-623-8280 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8295 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 623-8343 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 623-8343 

978-623-8350 

978-623-8225 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8301 

978-623-8315 



19 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL FOUNDERS' DAY - MAY 13, 2010 

FOUNDERS ' DA Y WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN IN 1965 TO MARK 

THE DATE OF THE TOWN'S INCORPORATION - MAY 6, 1646 -AND 

TO HONOR SCHOOL AND TOWN EMPLOYEES WITH TEN OR MORE YEARS 

OF DEDICATED SERVICE TO THE CITIZENS OF THE TOWN OF AN DOVER. 



TOWN DEPARTMENTS 



35 Years of Service: 



Wanda E. Batchelder, Police Department 
William J. Connors, Plant & Facilities 
Daniel H. Tremblay, Health Division 



Kevin J. Burke, Police Department 
Thomas F. Siopes, Police Department 



30 Years of Service: 



Leslie H. Baskin, Library 
Barbara E. Connolly Kiley, Police Dept. 
Ronald E. Hancock, Public Works 
Brian W. Moore, Public Works 
Rodney P. Smith, Accounting 



Lincoln O. Clark, Fire Rescue 
James A, Cuticchia, Fire Rescue 
Lesley J. Hewett, Police Department 
Elaine M. Shola, Purchasing 



25 Years of Service: 



Lee J. Britton, Police Department 

Deborah L. Fay, Public Works 

Kaija M. Gilmore, Building Division 

Paul G. Hinds, Public Works 

Wayne R. Merola, Fire Rescue 

Kevin P. Moore, Fire Rescue 

Wayne D. Nader, Police Department 

Marie C. Robertson, Library 

Dennis P. Sheehan, Coll./Treasurer Office 

Katherine Urquhart, Elder Services 



Mary Jane Burwell, Information Systems 

Richard P. Ford, Public Works 

David J. Hajj, Public Works 

Daniel G. Igoe, Police Department 

Stephen F. Migliori, Public Works 

Mary Ellen Morkeski, Police Department 

Todd R. Pomerleau, Fire Rescue 

John S. Ronan, Fire Rescue 

Scott A. Silva, Public Works 

Dolores J. Zimmer, Coll./Treasurer Office 



20 Years of Service: 



Edwin S. Ataide, Plant & Facilities 
Michael P. Murnane, Public Works 
Cynthia A. Vaughn, Public Works 



James R. Greenwood, Public Works 
Reginald S. Stapczynski, Town Manager 
Mary Ann T. Whittingham, CD&P 



15 Years of Service: 



Ryan T. Beal, Fire Rescue 
Brian C. Davies, Fire Rescue 
Charles E. Edgerly, Police Department 
David W. Froburg, Police Department 
Michael A. Giammasi, Fire Rescue 
Barbara McNamara, Library 



Linda L. Cleary, Conservation Division 

Susan L. Doolin, Information Systems 

Garrett E. Ferris, Fire Rescue 

John D. Gangi, Fire Rescue 

John W. Hines, Fire Rescue 

Richard G. O'Brien, Police Department 



20 



TOWN DEPARTMENTS 



15 Years of Service (Cont): 

Glen K. Ota, Police Department 
Ruth Rosensweig, Library 
Glenn E. Wilson, Youth Services 



Robert G. Pelletier, Fire Rescue 

Mary R. Stearns, Coll./Treasurer's Office 



10 Years of Service: 



Dianne M. Anciello, Public Works 
Dean Baumeister, Library 
Barbara M. Burke, Zoning Division 
John P. Burke, Plant & Facilities 
Jeffrey R. Crane, Public Works 
Robert M. Dalton, Fire Rescue 
Leonard B. Foote, Plant & Facilities 
Peter J. Gallant, Plant & Facilities 
Mark L. Gardella, Plant & Facilities 
Scott M. Gibson, Fire Rescue 
Edward J. Hammersley, Plant & Facilities 
Charles M. Jessico, Police Department 
James L. Landry, Jr., Fire Rescue 
Pamela J. MacKinnon, Library 
Lizeth A. Menard, Police Department 
Deborah J. Palumbo, Accounting 
John A. Peterson, Elder Services 
Dianne M. Roderick, Conservation 
Lynn E. Spitalere, Town Clerk's Office 
Brian T. Wright, Fire Rescue 



Nancy A. Bailey, Police Department 
Anne L. Berthold, Assessor's Office 
Lori A. Burke, Library 
Chad M. Cooper, Police Department 
Patricia M. D'Agata, Building Division 
Roger B. Eriksen, Elder Services 
Margaret M. Froburg, Police Department 
Mark L. Gardella, Plant & Facilities 
Steven E. Gerroir, Police Department 
Paula A. Hamel, Planning Division 
Mark A. Higginbottom, Police Department 
Christopher R. Kun, Plant & Facilities 
Linda A. Lane, Police Department 
Joseph A. Magliozzi, Police Department 
Theodora K. Moccia, Accounting 
John A. Petkus, Public Works 
Jennifer A. Ricupero, Plant & Facilities 
Tammy T. Ryan, Plant & Facilities 
Ian C. Timmons, Fire Rescue 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



40 Years of Service: 

Ethel T. Coltin, West Elementary 

35 Years of Service: 



Darlene A. Antonucci, Andover High 
Paula J. Eichner, Wood Hill Middle 

30 Years of Service: 

Virginia M. Champagne, Sanborn Elem. 
William A. Kolbe, Andover High 
George J. Spanos, Andover High 



Arthur W. Iworsley, West Elementary 



Albert W. Cayot, Andover High 
Patricia A. Thomson, West Elementary 



Susan A. Infantine, Shawsheen Elementary 
Jeanne D. Nomandy, West Elementary 



21 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



25 Years of Service: 



David A. Bettencourt, Doherty Middle 
John G. Heidenrich, West Middle 
Cheryl A. McGuire, High Plain Elem. 
Valerie J. Rurack, South Elementary 
Nancy M. Sweeney, Bancroft Elementary 



Diana L. Davison, Crossing Guard 
Elizabeth L. Macumber, Andover High 
Elizabeth M. Roos, West Elementary 
Anna M. Sullivan, Andover High 



20 Years of Service: 



Martha S. Bancroft, Shawsheen Elem. 
James F. Costello, Andover High 
Candace A. Hall-Nourse, Human Resources 
Susan E. Monteiro, West Elementary 
Joan M. Nimerowski, Sanborn Elementary 
Allen D. Smith, Bancroft Elementary 
Lynne M. Vaughan, Bancroft Elementary 
Paul L. Willis, Andover High 



15 Years of Service: 



Nicole Brezinski, High Plain Elementary 
Alberta A. Chirico, South Elementary 
Dorothy D. Delorenzo, Asst. Supt. Office 
Robin L. Dubois, High Plain Elementary 
Lisa A. Freeman, West Elementary 
Sheila A. Harrington, West Middle 
Joyce M. Larsen Maclary, Shawsheen El. 
Deborah A. McLaughlin, South Elem. 
Donna M. Mohan, High Plain Elementary 
Cynthia T. Olendzenski, High Plain Elem. 
Debra A. Powers, Andover High 
Nancy Shaheen, South Elementary 
Betty A. Singleton, Wood Hill Middle 
Patricia M. Tivnan, Doherty Middle 
Daphne J. Winders, Sanborn Elementary 
Janet L. Wright, Business Office 



10 Years of Service: 



Christine J. Baldwin, Sanborn Elementary 
Christine M. Bronson, Doherty Middle 
Abigail G. Cooper, Bancroft Elementary 
Karen J. Damphouse, West Elementary 
Kimberly DeNapoli, West Elementary 
Colleen M. Dolan, High Plain Elementary 
Rhoda Eberle, High Plain Elementary 
Laurie B. Farrell, Wood High Middle 



Sara H. Bean, Bancroft Elementary 
Kristina A. Dewey, Technology 
Nina Jones, Shawsheen Elementary 
William M. Napolitano, Substitute 
Claire S. Shaby, Shawsheen Elementary 
Sharyn R. Taitz, West Middle 
Rosemarie Webb, Sanborn Elementary 



Ricardo L. Chanquet, West Elementary 
Melinda G. Grossman, Shawsheen Elem. 
Renee R. Drueke, Andovr High 
David Fazio, Andover High 
Patricia H. Gregory, Wood Hill Middle 
Maryellen Johnson, Sanborn Elementary 
Maria A. Maffeo, Sanborn Elementary 
Ann M. McNamee, Doherty Middle 
Ann B. O'Donnell, Shawsheen Elementary 
Pauline Parry, Bancroft Elementary 
Susan M. Powers, High Plain Elementary 
Olga Shaknovsky, Andover High 
Lisa A. Spampinato, West Elementary 
Maureen A. Wholey, Andover High 
Diane L. Winkelman, High Plain Elem. 



Maureen A. Belbin, Doherty Middle 
June G. Constantineau, Crossing Guard 
Kevin L. Cyr, West Elementary 
Frank A. Defusco, Wood Hill Middle 
Cynthia E. DiStefano, Crossing Guard 
Kim M. Dowell, Wood Hill Middle 
Susan H. Farquhar, High Plain Elementary 
Kathleen M. Federico, Doherty Middle 



22 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



10 Years of Service (Cont): 



David M. Feole, Bancroft Elementary 
Christine M. Gould, Andover High 
Janet M. Hamilton, Shawsheen Elementary 
Barbara C. Lyle, West Elementary 
Barbara J. Munroe, Bancroft Elementary 
John J. Palen, Andover High 
Meredith C. Peterson, Doherty Middle 
Elaine A. Pineault, West Elementary 
Lucia C. Rizzo, South Elementary 
Swati Sarkar, Doherty Middle 
Brian T. Shea, Andover High 
Catherine L. Carr, High Plain Elementary 
Cleo P. Thompson, Andover High 
Laurie A. Wallace, Doherty Middle 



Terri L. Feole, Food Services 
Jennifer M. Griffin, Andover High 
Kristeen Y. Hartwell, Bancroft Elementary 
George B. Matthews, West Elementary 
Sally C. O'Rourke, Andover High 
Carol A. Pehrson, Bancroft Elementary 
Linda M. Phelan, West Elementary 
Jennifer B. Prudden, South Elementary 
Susan J. Rodriguez, South Elementary 
Joan Selby, Wood Hill Middle 
Stephen T. Sousa, Andover High 
Marlene S. Theodorou, West Middle 
Norma L. Villarreal,Wood High Middle 
Ellen B. Zribe, South Elementary 



23 



FINANCE & BUDGET DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 



FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 2011 Budget (July 1, 2010 - June 30, 
2011) was released on February 5, 2010. During the months of February, March and April, 
meetings were held with the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee and 
Department Heads to review the Budget and warrant article requests and to prepare 
recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

In April, the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 1 1,300 households. The Annual 
Town Meeting began on April 28, 2010 and the Fiscal Year 2011 operating budget (Article 4 and 
Article 5) was adopted in the amount of $134,739,568. This budget was an increase of $2,675,702 
or 2% over the Fiscal Year 2010 operating budget of $132,063,866. 

Some of the major accomplishments in 2010 are as follows: 

Prepared the Town Manager's Recommended FY-201 1 Budget. 

Prepared the Five- Year Capital Improvement Plan for FY-201 2 - FY-201 6. 

Provided staff support to the Finance Committee. 

Produced the 2010 Finance Committee Report for the 2010 Annual Town Meeting. 

Received a AAA bond rating from Standard and Poor's for the Town's bond issue. 

Implemented health insurance cost savings by shifting to MIIA Health Benefits Trust 

Group. 

ASSESSORS 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuing all real estate and personal property 
accounts in the Town, as well as defending all appeals of these taxes. The three-member board 
is also responsible for the awarding nearly 200 property tax exemptions on ah annual basis. 
Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled veterans, widows and widowers and 
individuals classified as blind. 

The Assessors also must conduct revaluations of all property on a triennial (every three 
years) basis. A revaluation was completed for Fiscal Year 2009. Interim adjustments were made 
in Fiscal Year 2011. The Board is responsible for meeting all Massachusetts Department of 
Revenue guidelines for property valuations, reporting of valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers vast amount of property and ownership related 
information that is available to the general public. Exterior digital photos are now recorded on 



24 



all property and the valuations, sales information and other pertinent information is available on 
the Town's web site. More than 1,000 requests for public records and information are received 
and processed on an annual basis. 

The Assessor's Division completed the valuation process for FY-2011 in a manner that 
allowed for timely tax billing. The Division, along with other financial staff, submitted all 
assessment and tax rate related information for approval using the Division of Local Service's 
Gateway Software. 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 



In 2010, the Purchasing Division processed approximately 1,080 purchase orders and 
2,594 requests for payment for the Town and 3,173 purchase orders and 362 requests for 
payment for the School Department. There were approximately 32 bids, 10 requests for 
proposals, 1 request for written responses and 1 request for qualifications that were advertised 
and officially opened during this period. The continued utilization of the State bid contracts 
available to cities and towns has provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Throughout 2010, Andover initiated and coordinated a number of Cooperative Bids as 
well as participated in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts 
General Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through 
the bidding process. Some of the items purchased were: xerographic paper for copy machines, 
road salt, fuel oil, office supplies, equipment and furniture and School athletic and student 
voluntary insurance. 

Some of the major Requests for Proposals and Bids solicited in 2010 were: 

Acquisition of Real Estate for a Town Yard 

Custodian Supplies 

Design and Construction Administration Services for Removal and Replacement of 

the High Plain Elementary and Wood Hill Middle Schools Roofs 

Fireworks Display for the Town of Andover 4 of July Celebration 

Design and Construction Administration Services for Improvements to the Veterans 

Memorial Auditorium 

Cooperative Bid for Vehicle Gasoline and Diesel Fuel 

Sanborn Elementary School Boilers Replacement Project 

Miscellaneous Roadway Construction and Paving Projects 

Miscellaneous Road Materials and Aggregates Annual Requirements 

Andover High School Resilient Track Resurfacing and Repair 

Roof Replacement to the High Plain Elementary and Wood Hill Middle Schools 

One new 201 1 Model Year, Medium Duty Emergency Medical Rescue Vehicle 

William M. Wood Memorial Park Project - Phase II 

Three new 2011 Model Marked Law Enforcement Full-size Sedans and one new 

201 1 All- Wheel Drive Full-size Unmarked Sedan 

Cooperative Highway Rock Salt, Solar Salt and Liquid Calcium Chloride 32% 

Water Main Construction - Burton Farm Road and Tanglewood Way 



25 



Granulated Activated Carbon Filter Media 

Qualifications from Construction Manager at Risk Contractors 

Professional Consulting Services for a Management and Organizational Study of the 

Department of Public Works and Plant & Facilities Department 

The Purchasing Division is also responsible for administering the contract compliance of 
Andover's Affirmative Action Plan as well as coordinating the Property and Casualty Insurance 
and Risk Management for all Town and School Departments. The Human Resources 
Department handles the Health and Personal insurance for both Town and School Departments. 

The Purchasing Division is also responsible for overseeing the Town's current insurance 
company's Rewards Program that helps control and reduce losses along with providing future 
savings on insurance premiums. Again in 2010, the Town of Andover received recognition from 
its insurance company, Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA), for its High 
Achievement under their Loss Control Program. Participation in the MIIA Rewards Program 
earned the Town a $25,868 credit reducing this past year's insurance premium by that amount. 
The Purchasing Division also processed approximately forty casualty and property claims during 
the year and was able to recover $55,002.09 for the Town. 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. 

Highlights during 2010 are as follows: 

■ Refinanced $13,279,000 of 1997, 2000, 2001 Bonds at 2.239% for a net savings in 
interest charges of $1,276,000 on February 24 th . 

■ Borrowed $4,285,000 for 1 year at .39% on February 25 th . 

■ Borrowed $5,566,000 for 20 years at 2.39 on February 25 th . 

■ Borrowed $300,000 for 9 months at .5% on June 1 5 th . 

Held a Land-Auction where the Town successfully sold 5 of 6 parcels, which were 

acquired from Foreclosure, for a total of $157,500. 

Continued the implementation of the new automated water meter reading program, 

including Final billing on the old meters and all necessary reconciliation. 

Continued with outstanding customer service in all areas of real estate, excise and water. 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for maintaining and improving the 
utilization of computerized data in municipal operations including financial records, word 
processing/spreadsheet/database files, electronic transmission and other varied electronic files. 
Major functions of this division are: network administration, financial application support and 
reporting, user support for office integration software, and hardware/software/operating system 
maintenance and upgrades. The Information Systems Division supports all users of the network 
and strives to meet the many diversified needs of town government administration. Maintaining 



26 



the integrity and improving the accessibility of all data on the network are priorities, especially 
since most users rely on network resources for daily operations. 

2010 highlights include the following: 

Continued participation with the Information Technology Committee to select a 

consultant to perform an Assessment and Strategic Plan; worked with the consultant on 

the assessment and final plan. 

Launched virtualized servers using Microsoft's free Hyper- V virtualization technology. 

Designed and implemented an additional network platform to allow resource sharing 

between all Town and School networks. 

Collaborated with the School's IT Department regarding an upgrade of financial 

software. 

Implemented the automation of additional electronic reporting requirements. 

Continued to assist the Collector/Treasurer's Office and Water Department to facilitate 

the Town- wide water meter radio-read replacement project. 

Enabled the online payment of Motor Excise Tax. 

Enhanced the use of utility billing software to include prior history dates on bills, 

incorporate fees on regular/special bills. 

Continued with the scheduled replacement of outdated desktops and printers via CIP 

funds. 

Revised the revenue procedure to provide timely coordination of data between the 

Collector/Treasurer's Office and the Accounting Office. 

Refined the internet security parameters to meet credit card industry security auditing 

requirements. 

Worked with the consultant on research and documentation of water billing and usage. 

Explored the needs and applications for applicant tracking with the Human Resources 

Department. 

Participated with the Cross-Departmental Permit Team to investigate the replacement of 

permitting software. 

Continued to maintain/improve the Town's website to provide information to residents. 



27 



BUDGET AND TAX RATE SUMMARY 

EXPENDITURES 


FINAL 
FY2009 

134,309,458 

4,000 

63,205 

223,700 



73.068 


FINAL 
FY2010 ' 

132,409,866 

4,000 

201,761 

38,884 



62.671 


FINAL 
FY2011 

136,128,816 

4,000 







61.280 


Appropriations & Articles 

Other Local Expenditures 

Tax Title Purposes 

Final Court Judgments 

Overlay/ Other Deficits 

Other amounts 

Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 

Total Other Local Expenditures 

State and County Charges 

Overlay Reserve for Abatements 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

REVENUES and OTHER FUNDING SOURCES 


363,973 

2,873,157 
1,127.947 


307,316 

3,079,417 
822.806 


65,280 

2,926,555 
772.521 


$138,674,535 

10,764,225 
1,551.447 


$136,619,405 

9,574,225 
1.551.447 


$139,893,172 

8,819,405 
1.551.447 


Revenue from State 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
School Construction Assistance 
Total from State 

Revenue from Town 

General Local Revenue 

Revenue for Specific Purposes-Offset Receipts 

Water and Sewer Revenue 

Total Local Receipts 

Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 
Free Cash used for Warrant Articles 
Other Available Funds 
Total Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 

Free Cash used for Operating Budget 

Total Non-Property Tax Revenues and Other Funding Source 

Total Property Taxes 
TOTAL REVENUES 


12,315,672 

9,803,000 

1,691,964 

13.526.502 


11,125,672 

8,879,764 

1,923,063 

12,774,627 


10,370,852 

9,201,000 

1,811,500 

12,242.028 


25,021,466 

1,183,147 
1 .597,496 


23,577,454 

334,000 
292.163 


23,254,528 

1,123,500 
485,992 


2,780,643 

580,000 

40,697,781 
97.976.754 


626,163 



35,329,289 
101.290.116 


1,609,492 



35,234,872 
104.658,300 


138,674,535 


136,619,405 


. 139,893,172 



VALUATIONS & TAX RATES 

TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 
RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 
COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 

WHERE REVENUES COME FROM 

STATE AID 
LOCAL REVENUE 
OTHER FUNDS 
FREE CASH 
PROPERTY TAXES 


FINAL 

FY2009 

$7,160,470 
12.16 
19.98 


FINAL 

FY2010 

$6,837,657 
13.19 
21.33 


FINAL 

FY2011 

$6,837,657 
14.12 
22.46 








8.88% 

18.04% 

1.15% 

1 .27% 

70.65% 

100.00% 


8.14% 

17.26% 

0.21% 

0.24% 

74.14% 


7.41% 

16.62% 

0.35% 

0.80% 

74.81% 


100.00% 


100.00% 



28 



Assessors Annual Report 2010 







ANNUAL PROPERTY VALUATIONS 






FY2008 


FY2008 


FY2009 


FY2009 


FY2010 


FY2010 


PROPERTY TYPE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


SINGLE FAMILY 


8,480 


$4,919,136,300 


8,484 


$4,656,528,600 


8,492 


$4,498,853,200 


CONDO 


1,558 


398,264,000 


1,570 


388,732,400 


1,585 


362,049,800 


MULTI FAMILY 


318 


243,441,700 


315 


229,151,600 


311 


219,756,300 


VACANT LAND 


538 


77,179,800 


556 


79,559,500 


548 


73,549,300 


OTHER RESIDENCE 


21 


15,027,600 


21 


14,039,200 


20 


13,180,700 


COMMERCIAL AND CHAPTER 


270 


558,906,023 


272 


541,868,527 


270 


528,547,655 


INDUSTRIAL 


139 


551,109,200 


139 


529,981,300 


139 


501,419,500 


MIXED USE 


175 


236,081,600 


171 


225,257,500 


171 


217,870,300 


PERSONAL PROPERTY 


514 


161,324,140 


622 


172,538,617 


642 


201,324,807 


TOTAL 


12,013 


7,160,470,363 


12,150 


6,837,657,244 


12,178 


6,616,551,562 









FISCAL YEAR EXCISE COMMITMENTS 






FY2008 


FY2009 


FY2010 




TOTAL 


$4,860,718 


$4,561,372 


$4,517,089 


Number of bills 


32,078 


31,395 


31,822 









TAX ABATEMENTS AND EXEMPTIONS 








FY2008 


FY2008 


FY2009 


FY2009 


FY2010 


FY2010 


ANNUAL EXEMPTIONS 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


WIDOWS 




10 


$2,735 


6 


$1,925 


7 


$2,344 


VETERANS 




121 


$98,857 


118 


$101,826 


122 


$96,302 


BLIND 




22 


$18,482 


22 


$18,824 


18 


$15,869 


SENIORS 




42 


$66,009 


41 


$68,882 


38 


$65,265 


DEFERRALS 




9 


$25,492 


11 


$29,940 


11 


$35,567 


HARDSHIPS 




I 


$1,000 


I 


$796 


I 


$398 




TOTALS 


205 


$212,575 


199 


$222,193 


197 


$215,745 






FY2008 


FY2008 


FY2009 


FY2009 


FY2010 


FY2010 


ANNUAL ABATEMENTS 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


RESIDENTIAL 




62 


$73,752 


72 


$50,486 


91 


$63,784 


SENIOR VOUCHER 




166 


$112,050 


192 


$129,600 


206 


$139,050 


COMM/IND 




4 


$92,809 


4 


$48,467 


21 


$603,537 


PERSONAL PROPERTY 


TOTALS 


2 
234 


$2,987 
$281,598 


2 
270 


$7,200 
$235,753 


15 

333 


$56,605 


$862,976 



29 



FINANCE STATISTICS 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE BILLS 




PURCHASE ORDERS 




3,500 



3,000 



o 



LD 
O 



ID 
O 



o 



oo 
o 



CTv 
O 



£££&:&:£&:&:&:&: 



INVESTMENT INCOME 



$1,700,000 

$1,500,000 

$1,300,000 

$1,100,000 

$900,000 

$700,000 

$500,000 

$300,000 

$100,000 



-EL 



££££££:££££: 



26,000 

24,000 

22,000 

20,000 

18,000 

16,000 

14,000 

12,000 

10,000 

8,000 

6,000 

4,000 

2,000 





TOWN WEBSITE VISITS 
(Mthly. Avg.) 



o 



rsl 
O 



o 



o 



u~> 
o 



O 



24 T 67Z 



25,359 




o 



oo 
o 



o 



fc fc 



o 



30 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk 's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town 's 
democratic process, to maintain and preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of the 
community and the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality service. 



The Town Clerk's office coordinated four elections in 2010 - a Special State Election for 
the U.S. Senate in January, the Annual Town Election in March, the State Primary Election in 
September and the State General Election in November. The Town Clerk's Office also 
coordinated the Annual Town Meeting in April and a Special Town Meeting in December 2010. 

The Town's vital records from 1985 have been scanned and are now issued through a 
scanning program that continues to provide great efficiencies in servicing the public. The staff 
works with the State Office of Vital Records and Statistics to implement the Vital Information 
Partnership System (VIP), a State-wide data base of vital records. 

Volunteers continue to be a great resource in the office. They work hundreds of hours 
assisting with the Town Census, inventorying records in the permanent vault, election duties and 
other duties where needed. Jerry and Sallie LaBarre, Arlene and Tony Sofia, Polly Robichaud, 
Charlotte Taylor and Carol Hopkinson have volunteered for many years and are to be 
commended for the valuable services they provide to the Office and the Town. 

In 2010, the Office spent time educating Andover residents about the 2010 Federal 
Census and the importance of returning their Census. The 2000 Federal Census showed the 
official census numbers at 31,247 - a 9% increase over ten years. 

Town Clerk Randy Hanson retired in June after 21 years of dedicated service to the 
Town. During her tenure, Randy coordinated 33 Annual and Special Town Meetings, 22 Annual 
and Special Town Elections, 15 State/Federal Primary Elections, 10 State/Federal Elections, 2 
Special State Primary Elections and 2 Special State Elections. She attended 430 Board of 
Selectmen's meetings in her capacity as Town Clerk. Lawrence J. Murphy was appointed as the 
new Town Clerk in August. 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS: 



TOWN CENSUS 

In January, the Town Census was mailed to 1 1,989 households. The Town's population 
at the completion of the Census was 32,133. 

VOTER REGISTRATION/ELECTION TURNOUT 

The year ended with 20,705 active registered voters in nine precincts as follows: 

Precinct 1 - 2208 Precinct 2 - 2273 Precinct 3 - 2393 

Precinct 4 - 21 76 Precinct 5 - 2306 Precinct 6 - 2255 

Precinct 7 - 2326 Precinct 8 - 2430 Precinct 9-2338 

31 



Election 

Special State 
Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
State Primary Election 
State Election 
Special Town Meeting 

* First Night Attendance 

RECORDINGS 

Births Recorded 

Marriages Recorded 

Deaths Recorded 

Dog Licenses Sold 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold 

Business Certificates 

New Voter Registrations 

Passport Applications 

REVENUES 

Marriage Licenses 
Certified Copies 
Miscellaneous Licenses Income 
Liquor Licenses Income 
Business Certificate Filings 
Miscellaneous Income 
Passport Fees 
Dog Licenses 
Non Criminal Violations 
Copy of Public Records 
Fishing and Hunting Licenses 

TOTAL 



Date 


No. Voted 


% of Active Voters 


January 19 th 


14,332 


70% 


March 23 rd 


1,639 


8% 


April 28 th & 29 th 


652* 


3% 


September 14 th 


5,802 


29% 


November 2 nd 


14,263 


70% 


December 6 th 


885 


4% 



2008 



2009 



2010 



249 


257 


220 


113 


116 


122 


290 


274 


233 


2,493 


2,580 


2,469 


300 


248 


244 


99 


95 


70 


1,735 


927 


1,296 


541 


613 


531 


2008 


2009 


2010 


2,900.00 


2,950.00 


3,125.00 


21,249.00 


21,590.00 


19,035.00 


14,285.00 


13,355.00 


12,925.00 


111,570.00 


97,450.00 


114,375.00 


5,245.00 


4,549.00 


4,272.00 


1,901.00 


1,031.00 


1,962.00 


13,960.00 


15,325.00 


13,275.00 


38,968.00 


39,979.00 


32,105.50 


8,150.00 


3,340.00 


2,900.00 


167.00 


250.00 


257.00 


6,746.25* 


6,592.15** 


6,645.74*** 


$225,141.25 


$206,411.15 


$210,877.24 



* $6,417.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife - $329.00 was 

retained by the Town. 
** $6,271 .50 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife - $320.65 was 

retained by the Town. 
*** $6,325.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife - $320.50 was 

retained by the Town. 



32 



TOWN CLERK STATISTICS 



$250,000 
$225,000 
$200,000 
$175,000 
$150,000 
$125,000 
$100,000 
$75,000 
$50,000 



FEE REVENUES 





en 

o 

m 

(Nl 
•fcftt 






o 

LO 

r\i 

Lf) 




O 
tH 
O 
r-J 
i-l 
INI 
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IN 

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rvi 
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00 

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1-H 

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CO 

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CO 

i-H 






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^vv/^// ^w 



200 
190 
180 

170 

160 

150 

140 

130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 



BUSINESS CERTIFICATES 



All 



111 



174 1 72 




^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ / ^ ^ ^ 



J 



DOG LICENSES 




^ & J§ 



<k> 



& js> 



<*? <£? $>' <$> $>' $> ^ ^ $>• £ 



VITAL RECORDS & PASSPORTS 



4,000 
3,500 
3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 
500 A 







\o * H 



2 LT> 



<^VVVVV ^w 



n Vita Is 



n Passports 



33 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During 2010, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. 
Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town 
Counsel. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on 
almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all warrant articles, drafted many of them, and 
attended all Annual and Special Town Meetings. Advice was given to Town officials and to 
Town Meeting on the legal basis for warrant articles. Town Counsel attended meetings of 
various Town Boards and Commissions which held hearings on various requests from 
applicants. During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and 
numerous deeds, easements, releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. 

Town Counsel defended the Town in two cases challenging sewer betterment 
assessments and the Court dismissed both of those challenges. 

Presentations were made to Town officials regarding significant amendments to the Open 
Meeting Law. Special legislation was drafted to submit to the Legislature in accordance with a 
Town Meeting vote. Responses to public records requests were prepared. Documents were 
drafted to submit to the Massachusetts School Building Assistance Bureau for the Bancroft 
School construction project. Assistance was provided for amendments to the Subdivision Rules 
and Regulations. 



34 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality of 
life in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property. However; with the changing 
times of increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the 
community. To continue our mission, we all maintain an open door policy to the community, 
working with their suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of life that 
we all enjoy in Andover. 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public 
safety and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members of the 
Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover, to ensure that the peace and tranquility of our neighborhoods 
are maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are reduced. The Department emphasizes 
integrity, honesty, impartiality and professionalism from its members creating an environment 
that values differences and fosters fairness and flexibility in our mission. The Department 
encourages citizen input and interaction that will assist in developing sound partnerships between 
the community and the Police. Working together will protect our future and enhance the quality 
of life for everyone within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Department handled 34,495 incidents in 2010 - a 1% decrease from 2009. There 
were 496 arrests (7% decrease), 257 larcenies (22% decrease) and 73 burglaries (3% decrease). 
The Department also responded to 45 calls of domestic abuse - a 2% decrease over last year. 

The Department issued 5,187 motor vehicle citations during the year which is a 19% 
decrease from 2009. There were 924 motor vehicle accidents handled by the Department which 
is 2% increase. The reduction in vehicle citations is a direct relation to staffing at minimum 
manning levels on patrol shifts. 97% of the night patrol shifts are at the minimum allowable 
staffing level therefore reducing proactive selective traffic enforcement. The result is the 
inability to follow up on speed complaints from citizens on a timely basis. 

The Police Department continued to work closely with other Town departments, state and 
federal agencies and the community throughout the year. The Sub-Station, located on 
Grandview Terrace, remains closed for budgetary reasons, however, the Department continued 
its partnership with the residents at the Andover Housing Authority and the Youth Services 
Division through the New Horizons for Youth Program which is now funded within the 
Department budget. 

The Department continues to have great success with a School Resource Officer assigned 
to the Greater Lawrence Technical High School. Funding for this position is subsided by the 
Technical School. 



35 



The Department also participated in numerous events including the Holiday and 
Memorial Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, Andover Days, the 
Feaster Five Road Race on Thanksgiving Day as well as numerous other road races held 
throughout the year. 

The Department is also involved in numerous regional initiatives and is an active member 
in the North Eastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council (NEMLEC) which is a 
consortium of 54 Police Agencies and 2 sheriff departments. We also participate in the Boston 
Area Police Radio Network (BAPERN) which allows for interoperable radio communications 
with other agencies as well as collective purchases for public safety equipment. 

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION 

RECORDS SECTION 

The Records Division provides support services to all divisions within the Police 
Department. This service enables information to flow efficiently throughout the Department as 
well as to the entire community. 

The Police Department received more than $97,701.00 in new grant money during 2010. 
These grants allow the Department to serve the community by providing funding for personnel 
and other resources. Equipment grants allowed the Department to provide car safety seats and 
bicycle helmets to those who would otherwise not be able to afford such safety items. 
Emergency equipment such as shelters, body armor, gas masks, defibrillators and other 
emergency communication equipment were also purchased with this grant money. Highway 
Safety grants allowed for extra patrols, participation in several Massachusetts State Police 
Sobriety Checkpoints and selective enforcement around high accident locations. E-9-1-1 grants 
allowed the Department to train and certify all dispatchers in Emergency Medical Dispatching. 

The Court Section processed a total of 496 arrests and 622 summonses. This included 
tracking all Police Department cases from inception to disposition and coordinating officers' 
appearances in court. In addition, this section assists in tracking District Court cases for other 
Town Departments such as the Health Division, Building Division, etc. 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division is responsible for the follow-up of investigations conducted by 
the agency. The Detective Division also oversees the Substance Abuse Unit. This unit was 
created in response to the community's request for the Police Department to take a more active 
role in combating drugs and alcohol in the Town. The Division also has one investigator 
assigned as a Juvenile Officer. The Juvenile Officer works closely with the schools and courts in 
processing Juvenile cases. 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division was instrumental in solving and identifying the perpetrators 
of numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases through the judicial system. 



The Detective Division followed up and investigated 73 burglaries and 257 larcenies. 

The Division also investigates internet criminal activity. They recognize this new aspect 
of Internet crime as a major problem to our community and caution all parents and residents of 
the Town to be vigilant in combating this increasing problem. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

The Animal Control Officer answered 713 calls for service in 2010. He responded to 250 
dog complaints and impounded 67 dogs and 3 cats. He also removed 235 deceased animals. In 
addition to these removed animals, there were 25 deer struck and killed by motor vehicles in 
Town. 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Town's Emergency Management is directed by the Chief of Police and serves as the 
local link to the Federal and State Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA). the 
Department of Homeland Security and the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force. It also includes a 
network of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio 
services. A Citizen Emergency Response Team (CERT) has also been established and is 
providing residents with training and equipment that will allow them to be better prepared in 
times of crisis. 

The Chief of Police is also the Town's Liaison with the Regional Local Emergency 
Planning Committee (LEPC) and is responsible for coordinating the Town's response to any 
hazardous materials incident. 

The Chief of Police is the current Chairman of the Commonwealth's Northeast Homeland 
Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC) which covers 85 communities in the region. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. They 
are a very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services as a 
resource. 

TRIAD - CRIME PREVENTION PARTNERSHIP/SENIOR CITIZEN LL4JSON 

The Department has an officer assigned as a liaison to the Senior Center to assist the 
Town's senior population with quality of life and crime prevention issues and response to 
emergency situations. The liaison is also counsel to the TRLAD Council which is a partnership 
between the Essex County District Attorney, the Essex County Sherriff. the Andover Police 
Department and the senior citizens of the community. 



37 



POLICE STATISTICS 



ARRESTS 



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38 



POLICE STATISTICS 



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39 



FIRE RESCUE 

T/ie mission of Andover Fire Rescue is to serve the citizens of the community and its 
visitors by protecting them from the dangers created by man-made and natural emergencies. 



Andover Fire Rescue provides professional services such as fire suppression. EMS, 
technical rescue, and hazardous materials response. The organization aggressively attempts to 
minimize the risks associated with these incidents through effective fire prevention and 
investigation, code enforcement, public education and injury prevention programs. The 
Department is dedicated to assisting those in need regardless of the severity of the problem. 

Value Statement 

The values of Andover Fire Rescue are service to those in need and community 
involvement through the professionalism, integrity, and dedication of its personnel. 

Fire Rescue and EMS Operations 

There are two basic sub-divisions within the Operations Division of Andover Fire Rescue 
— Fire Rescue and Emergency Medical Services. 

The Operations Division operates on four shifts led by a Deputy Fire Chief who is 
responsible for the oversight of all activities on a particular shift. Those responsibilities range 
from incident response and training, ensuring there is adequate personnel coverage and 
appropriately protecting the community on a given day. 

The Operations Division has primary responsibility for responding to emergency and 
urgent calls for help from the public. Services provided include combating all types of fires, 
providing emergency medical care to the sick and injured, containing and mitigating the effects 
of leaks and spills of hazardous materials, rescuing those who are physically trapped in such 
situations as motor vehicle accidents, industrial accidents or collapsed structures, rescuing 
persons caught in swift moving water, mitigating the hazards associated from downed power 
lines or natural gas leaks and providing aid in situations where those in the community need 
special assistance such as lock outin situations, or animal rescues. 

In addition, all of the men and women of Andover Fire Rescue participate in presenting 
public fire safety and emergency preparedness educational programs, safety inspections, 
mamtaining equipment, apparatus and facilities and continuous training. 

Andover Fire Rescue operates out of three fire stations with three EMT Engine 
Companies, one EMT Ladder Company and two Basic Life Support (BLS) ambulances 
providing 24 7 coverage. The fire stations are located on North Main Street, Greenwood Road 
and at the intersection of Clark Road and Andover Street. 



40 



Several specialized pieces of equipment (such as boats and a trench rescue trailer) are 
located throughout the community and staffed on an "as needed" basis by personnel normally 
assigned to the engine companies. 

Andover Fire Rescue has one reserve engine, one reserve ladder and two reserve 
ambulances among its fleet. The reason for the reserve apparatus is to ensure that the Town is 
appropriately protected when a "front line" truck is out of service for repairs or preventative 
maintenance, and to maintain the Insurance Services Office (ISO) Class 3 rating. This rating is 
currently being reviewed by a representative of the ISO to establish if the current rating is 
appropriate or needs revision. 

The Department is comprised of sixty-eight personnel including four Deputy Chiefs, 
twelve Lieutenants and forty-eight firefighters. Suppression personnel work a 24-hour schedule 
with one of the four groups on-duty each day. 

One of the Deputy Chiefs serves as the Training Officer for Andover Fire Rescue and has 
the responsibility of coordinating and/or delivering all training-related programs in relation to the 
myriad of services provided by the Fire Rescue personnel. It ranges from the review of initial 
training that newly hired recruits receive while attending the Massachusetts Firefighting 
Academy, specialized rescue training recertification or continuing education and training to the 
entire organization. 

The delivery of Emergency Medical Services training is provided by Paramedic and EMT 
certified personnel from outside agencies or from within the organization. Extensive Federal and 
State regulations relative to the provision of emergency medical services and the appropriate 
documentation and administrative requirements, necessitate special focus and attention. 

Fire Rescue and EMS Resources 

Andover Fire Rescue has three fire stations - each has one or more staffed companies as well 
as specialized and/or reserve equipment. 

Station 1 , Central Station - 32 North Main Street (downtown area) 

~ Staffed companies: Engine Company, Ladder Company, ambulance, Deputy 

Chief 
~ Specialized apparatus: 2 rescue boats, trench rescue trainer and air support 

vehicle 
~ Reserve apparatus: engine, ladder truck 2 ambulances 

Station 2, Ballardvale Station - Clark Road and Andover Street 
~ Staffed company: Engine Company 
~ Specialized apparatus: 1 Rescue boat 

Station 3, West Station - Greenwood Road (West Andover area) 

~ Staffed companies: Engine Company, ambulance 

~ Specialized apparatus: 2 rescue boats, fire alarm bucket truck 



41 



Each of the four platoons consists of seventeen positions with a minimum daily staffing 
level of fifteen Firefighter/EMT's and Command staff. 

Command Staff: One Deputy Chief 

Engine Companies: One Lieutenant, one driver/operator and one firefighter 

Ladder Company: One driver/operator 

Ambulance: Two Emergency Medical Technicians 

Andover Fire Rescue currently has Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with 
several communities to provide mutual aid, automatic mutual aid and other response needs in the 
event that the on-duty resources are overwhelmed by an incident. These agreements contain the 
provision of service by Andover Fire Rescue to other communities in return for service to the 
community of Andover. 

Fire Prevention 

The following five primary objectives measure the success of the work done by the Fire 
Prevention Office: 

Reduce fire loss and injuries through the administration of risk-based community 

education programs. 

Manage risk associated with fire and environmental emergencies through successful 

implementation to engineering, inspection, code compliance and hazardous materials 

management. 

Ensure citizens can escape a fire safely, that suppression forces have the means to control 

a fire with minimal risk of injury and that damages to physical resources area minimized 

in an emergency through proactive prevention efforts in new and existing buildings. 

Investigate fire and hazardous materials incidents to understand causes and effects and 

apply lessons learned to improving our community's safety programs. 

Ensure that the Department is meeting the service demands of the community and 

providing excellent customer service. We strive to meet the interests of the Fire 

Prevention responsibility while attempting to meet the interests of the residents. 

The Fire Prevention Officer also supports the Incident Commander at all escalating fire 
and rescue incidents by fulfilling the staff function of Safety Officer. The Fire Prevention 
Officer responds directly to the scene to coordinate and address any safety- and personnel 
accountability concerns that may arise during the mitigation of the incident. 

The Department annually inspects three or more family dwellings, schools, theaters and 
all public, municipal, commercial and industrial occupancies. All nursing homes, rest homes, 
hospitals infirmaries and inn holders are inspected on a quarterly basis. Fire drills are conducted 
at each public and private school quarterly and public sector training is conducted per their 
request. Facilities requiring assistance in developing evacuation plans are also afforded the 
guidance necessary in preparing the plans. All necessary State and Local permits for storage of 
flammables, installation of oil burners, fireworks and pyrotechnic displays, storage of gunpowder 
or blasting agents and the daily blasting or open burning permits are issued by Fire Rescue. 



42 



Fire Investigation 

Andover Fire Rescue is responsible for conducting fire scene investigations to determine 
origin and cause. Fire Rescue has a Deputy Fire Chief who is specially trained in performing fire 
and arson investigations to determine whether the fire was accidental or arson in nature. Fire 
Investigators thoroughly examine fire scenes, interview victims, witnesses and potential 
suspects. The investigators are also responsible for collecting evidence and processing the 
evidence to determine the cause of the fire. 

Andover Fire Rescue has a Deputy Chief who teams up with members of the Andover 
Police Department, Massachusetts Fire Marshal's Office, Massachusetts State Police and the 
Essex County District Attorneys Office in the prosecution of arson cases. All entities involved 
are required to prepare detailed reports, present evidence and testify in Court for fire cause cases. 

Fire Protection 

Andover Fire Rescue provides services ranging from the education of elementary school 
children to the rescue of elderly citizens from nursing home fires. Installation and maintenance 
of all fire alarm wiring of all coded fire alarm boxes is also provided. 

Specialized Rescues 

In addition to fire and emergency medical services, the Department performs numerous 
rescue missions. These include incidents involving stalled elevators, trench collapse rescue, 
confined spaces, high/low angle rope rescues, surface water and ice rescues. 

Hazardous Materials Response 

The Department, in cooperation with the District Hazardous Materials Team, mitigates 
all hazardous materials incidents. The District 6 Team is comprised of members from various 
departments from Billerica to Gloucester. Andover Fire Rescue maintains records of any and all 
buildings that store hazardous materials over the threshold amounts established by the 
Environmental Protection Agency. These records are required to be resubmitted to the 
Department on an annual basis prior to March 31 st . 

Emergency Medical Services 

Andover Fire Rescue provides first response to all medical emergencies due to accidents 
or medical ailments. The surrounding communities of North Andover, Tewksbury, North 
Reading, Reading, Billerica, Methuen and Salem, NH provide back up mutual aid ambulance 
service. In addition, the Lawrence General Hospital Paramedic Unit is requested when the 
emergency dictates the need for Advanced Life Support (ALS) based on stringent protocols 
established through collaboration between Andover Fire and Lawrence General Hospital. 
Andover' s ambulance service has recently upgraded its license from a Basic Life Support status 
to an Enhanced Life Support status as the result of placing Automatic External Defibrillators on 
all of its emergency vehicles. 



43 



FIRE STATISTICS 



FIRE CALLS 



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44 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant & Facilities Department is to provide a responsive, well planned 
and cost effective maintenance operation and capital improvement program for all Town and 
School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas 
within their responsibility. 

The Plant & Facilities Department provides scheduled and non-routine maintenance services 
to all Town and School buildings (over 1.35 million square feet), parks and grounds, cemetery, 
forestry and vehicle operations. Additionally, the Department is responsible for the following: 

Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 

construction projects, landscape and field projects and driveway and parking areas. 

Town and School building and field rental functions. 

The Town's fuel depot. 

Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 

Custodial services to all Town buildings. 

Town-owned traffic and streetlights. 

Building security. 

Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Department is managed by a Director who is supported by four Superintendents, an 
Executive Secretary, a Construction Project Manager, a Work Control Center Coordinator, two 
part-time Accounts Payable Clerks, a Business Manager, a Facilities Services Supervisor and a 
diverse group of skilled and semi-skilled Maintenance Tradespersons, Vehicle Mechanics, 
Custodians and Grounds and Tree Workers. 

ADMINISTRATION ACCOMPLISHMENTS/HIGHLIGHTS 

The new Bancroft School Schematic Design Phase was completed and the Massachusetts 
School Building Authority approved the total budget of $44,659,837. The Town is 
eligible to receive a total 43% reimbursement rate on the eligible costs, which results in a 
reimbursement of $16,773,753. Of that total 43% reimbursement rate, the Town received 
five bonus points, which includes 2% for a Green School, 1% for using the Construction 
Management at Risk process and 2% percent was awarded for the Town's excellent 
School Maintenance program. To date, Andover is the only Town in the State to receive 
the maximum 2% in this category. 

Four additional roof replacement projects were completed at Andover High School, 
Wood Hill Middle - High Plain Elementary Schools, the Water Treatment Plant and 
Memorial Hall Library. To date 758,345 s/f of new roofing is complete Town wide since 
this program began. The two projects planned for 2012 will complete the process. 
■ Renovation of the Doherty Middle School Memorial Building Auditorium. 



45 



Over 70 Summer and Fall projects were completed at multiple Town and School 
buildings and sites. 

Administration of the Bald Hill Compost Site Permit Program: 
~ FY2010 Revenue of $22,123.50 in Permit Sales 

~ The above $22,123.50 revenue used to offset operating costs of $36,100 (not 
including in-house labor) 
Energy Conservation/Cost Avoidance: 

~ The Department's energy efficiency measures resulted in the Town of Andover 
receiving the Mass Savers Business Award 2010 for Outstanding Achievements 
in Energy Efficiency. This is the third major energy award that the Town has 
received since 2007. 
~ The Town of Andover was Designated a Green Community in 2010 by the 
Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) Green Communities 
Division. Andover is one of the first communities in Massachusetts to receive this 
designation, which allowed the Town to apply for energy project grant funds. 
~ Efficient lighting installations were completed at seven additional Town and 
School buildings in 2010, bringing the total up to 11 buildings over the past two 
years and a projected annual savings of $212,600. The Town funded these 
projects with a Green Communities grant, NGRID rebates and an interest free 
loan from NGRID which result in a 2.7 year payback. The Town has received 
over $900,000 in rebates and grants over the past eight years. 
~ The Department negotiated new utility contracts that will result in a 25.5% 
decrease in natural gas supply costs and a 6.2% decrease in electricity supply 
contracts. 
~ A two kilowatt Solar Voltaic Panel System, paid for by a Grant, was installed on 
the Doherty Middle School. 
Tree City USA designation for the 1 1th consecutive year by the National Arbor Day 
Foundation. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISIONS 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
Superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, 
plumbing, carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings. The two 
Superintendents also function as Project Managers on a variety of Town/School capital 
improvement projects. Additionally, these divisions provide mail delivery to all buildings and 
maintain traffic signals and Town-owned street light poles. 

2008 2009 2010 

School Labor Hours 20,107 20,457 17,700 

School - Total Labor & Material Cost $978,951 $1,129,900 $1,073,547 

Town Labor Hours 10,023 7,309 6,193 

Town - Total Labor & Material Costs $767,080 $687,817 $626,655 



46 



BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

BANCROFT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

■ Additional structural repairs completed 

DOHERTY MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Renovated main office area to make it handicap compliant 

Completed asbestos abatement and installed new vinyl floor tiles in the Copy Center 

HIGH PLAIN ELEMENTARY/WOOD HILL MIDDLE SCHOOLS 
Installed a new PVC roof 

■ New CCTV camera system installed school wide 

ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL/COLLINS CENTER 

Removed carpeting and installed new vinyl floor tiles in guidance suite 

Removed carpeting and installed new vinyl floor tiles in 3 offices 

Provided air conditioning to a special education classroom. 

Converted 1 classroom HVAC controls to direct digital with ventilation demand 

control (Energy Savings) 

SANBORN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Exterior soffits and fascia painted 

Replaced one of two boilers, all breeching, and added a new stack liner 
Replaced unreliable automatic transfer switch on main electrical switchboard 
Replaced underground oil storage tank monitoring systems with a new system to meet 
new code requirement 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

Constructed two new offices for the newly consolidated IT Department 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Installed 4 new windows in classroom areas 

SOUTH ELEMENTARY 

Installed new perimeter security system 

Replaced underground oil storage tank monitoring systems for code compliance 

Repointed and braced main chimney 

WEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Exterior roof drain connection to underground drainage in courtyard 

■ Reduced classroom HVAC noise levels for a hearing impaired student 

WEST MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Replaced Auditorium's lighting dimming equipment and stage border lights 



47 



ALL SCHOOLS 

Fire alarm system testing and maintenance 
AHERA (bi-annual asbestos) inspections 
Screened and recoated all gymnasium floors 

TOWN PROJECTS 

BALD HILL STICKER FEE PROGRAM 

$22,123.50 in revenue from permit sales in FY2010 

BLANCHARD STREET 

Abatement and demolition of 1 5 Blanchard Street completed 

COMPUTERIZED MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (CMM) 

Completed transition from existing computerized maintenance management program to a 

new online system. 

New vehicle maintenance software system is in process, replacing an older system 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Installed new windows on the first floor 

Installed railing on the sidewalk along Essex Street 

Installed new vinyl floor tiles in both staff rooms and the receiving room 

Installed new carpeting in all floors - In process 

Installed new bathroom partitions in lower level Men's and Ladies' rooms 

PEARSON STREET PROPERTIES 

Support to temporary Youth Center building 
Abatement and demolition of 1 4 & 16 Pearson Street 

PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING 

Exterior masonry corrective work completed 

SENIOR CENTER 

Renovated tunnel area for improved access to Four Season Room 
New walk-in freezer installation design completed 

TOWN HOUSE 

Installed new bathroom partitions in Men's and Ladies' rooms 
Replaced the building backflow preventer 

TOWN OFFICES 

Major roof repairs to parapet completed 

Renovated old Youth Services office into a new conference room and administrative 

offices. 

TOWN YARD 

Supported the Town Yard Committee evaluation process 



48 



WOOD PARK PROJECT 

The final phase of the Wood Memorial Park restoration project is in process and will be 
complete during the Spring of 201 1. 

NEW ROOFING WORK - INSTALLATIONS COMPLETED 

AHS School (final portion completed) 
Memorial Hall Library - Slate roof 
Water Treatment Plant 
Wood Hill/High Plain 
Rec Park 
Pomps Pond 

ENERGY CONSERVATION 

Installed energy efficient lighting at Doherty Middle School, High Plain Elementary/ 
Wood Hill Middle Schools, Sanborn Elementary School, South Elementary School, West 
Elementary School, Public Safety Center, and Town House. 



The chart below highlights the completion of the Town wide Energy Efficient Lighting Program 



Plant & Facilities Department 

Energy Efficient Lighting Upgrades 



Building 

Doherty Middle 

High Plain/Wood Hill 

Sanborn Elementary 

South Elementary 

West Elementary 

Andover High School 

West Middle 

Public Safety Center 

Town House 

Town Offices 

Library 

Total 



KWH 

savings 

77,902 
175,063 
67,525 
106,300 
154,911 
384,755 
103,990 
64,321 
18,664 
207,351 
105,421 
1,466,203 



Annual 
savings 

$11,296 

$25,384 

$9,791 
$15,414 
$22,462 
$55,789 
$15,079 

$9,327 

$2,706 
$30,066 
$15,286 

$212,600 ! 



• Total Project Cost $1,323,031 

• Grants & Rebates $633,158 

• Town Funded* $689,873 

•(interest free loan paid from savings) 

$212,600 Annual Savings j 

Payback 2.7 years 



49 



PARKS & GROUNDS, CEMETERY and FORESTRY DIVISIONS 

The three Parks & Grounds Divisions (Parks & Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They operate under the supervision of one Superintendent and 
share some equipment and work together on special projects. The three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties, such as providing 
support to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole 
maintenance, fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage projects, snow removal and repairing park 
benches and tables. 

PARKS & GROUNDS, FORESTRY AND CEMETERY STATISTICS 

Schools Town 

Man Hours 4,846 19,068 

Labor & Materials $159,093 $672,365 

Fields Revolving Fund Revenue FY2010 FY2011 

Actual Estimate 



$69,000 $80,500 



PARKS & GROUNDS DIVISION 



This division maintains over 2.75 million square feet of ball fields and 1.4 million square 
feet of lawn areas. Ball fields and lawns are located on all School and Town building sites and 
other Town properties including Ballardvale Playground, Upper and Lower Shawsheen, the 
Bowling Green, Town-owned parks, playgrounds and designated islands, triangles and other 
parcels throughout the Town. Ball fields are prepared (groomed and lined) for all secondary 
school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, watering, over-seeding, 
liming, fertilizing and weed and insect control. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs 
and shrub beds on Town property and is responsible for snow removal at all Town buildings. 

CEMETERY DIVISION 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town, contains 
approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 2010, there were 45 full 
burials, 30 cremations and 33 gravesites sold for total revenue of $55,574. Cemetery operations 
and maintenance includes burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small 
trees, leaf pickup, Town- wide snow removal and other tasks, including grounds maintenance and 
special projects at other Town facilities. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of all Town-owned trees. Forestry 
Division work includes: pruning trees, clearing storm damage, flat clearing areas of undesirable 
vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved visibility. The 
Forestry Division also performs roadside mowing throughout the Town, maintains the Bald Hill 
compost site and plows snow for the Department of Public Works. 



50 



PARKS & GROUNDS, CEMETERY and FORESTRY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Multiple fertilizer applications - Town and School fields 

Irrigation systems - performed spring and fall maintenance to all Town and School systems 

Applied diamond mix to all Town and School baseball diamonds 

Lower Shawsheen Field - aerated and seeded the field three times during growing season 

Upper Shawsheen Field - aerated and seeded the field three times during growing season 

South School Fields - aerated and seeded twice during growing season 

Wood Hill and High Plain Fields - aerated and seeded twice during growing season 

Completed reconstruction of West Middle Varsity baseball infield (drainage, new 

irrigation, grading, new sod, new diamond mix). 

Baseball backstop upgrade completed at West Middle 90ft. diamond 

Snow removal at seven Town buildings 

Deicing all sidewalks at Town owned buildings 

Assisting outside contracting when snow is removed from school roofs (loader work) 

Received Tree City USA designation for the eleventh consecutive year 

Removed six hazard trees on Cemetery property, continued pruning of low hanging limbs 

throughout the Cemetery 

Responded to 1 6 1 requests for tree work from Town residents 

Responded to 1 8 emergency tree calls from the Andover Police Department 

Planted eight new public shade trees during the spring of 2010 

Bald Hill Recycling Facility - Supervised site monitors and provided support to the 

composting operation, which produced 1,800 cubic yards of processed compost 

Coordinated the installation of the holiday decorations on Main Street (Nov. 2010) 

Celebrated Arbor Day, April 30, 2010, at Elm Green Veterans Memorial Park 

Removed overgrown plants at Elm Green and replanted with new in April, 2010 

The Forestry Division mowed roadside vegetation along 35 miles of Town roads 

32 stumps were ground out, the chips were removed and the areas were loamed & seeded 

Assisted the Department of Public Works with plowing during snow storms 

Removed an additional 330 feet of existing blacktop from old road on Cemetery Grounds 

and prepared the area for new blacktop 

Continued weed eradication program throughout the Cemetery grounds 

Continued shrub removal adjacent to head stones throughout the Cemetery grounds 



VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a Superintendent, who is also 
responsible for purchasing and materials management for all Plant & Facilities operating 
divisions. This division provides maintenance to all Town and School vehicles and major pieces 
of equipment including fire apparatus, police cruisers, DPW trucks and heavy equipment, Plant 
& Facilities trucks and heavy equipment, Town/School emergency generators and other support 
vehicles. The Superintendent of the Vehicle Maintenance Division also coordinates the 
purchasing of all new Town vehicles. 



51 



84,713 


85,648 


81,608 


45,763 


46,571 


42,464 


130,476 


132,219 


124,072 



VEHICLE MAINTENANCE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Purchased new fleet maintenance software system - Installation in process 

Updated vehicle diagnostic software 

Provided preventive maintenance and general repairs to 155 Town vehicles, 62 major 

pieces of equipment, 18 emergency generators for School and Town buildings and 56 

smaller pieces of equipment. 

Completed 849 work orders totaling 4,069 man hours and $570,288 in labor & materials. 

Provided administrative support to vehicle purchases for Town departments. 

Supported the Department of Public Works snow removal operations (equipment 

maintenance, installation and removal of sander units and snow plowing). 

Maintained and repaired all fire apparatus, including assisting with federally-mandated 

inspections of the ladder trucks' hydraulic and pump systems. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE STATISTICS 

2008 2009 2010 

Gasoline 
Diesel 
Total Gallons 

FACILITIES SERVICES DIVISION 

The Facilities Services Division is managed by a Supervisor and is responsible for all Town 
custodial services, including support to the Library, Public Safety, Town House, Town Offices, 
and Senior Center. This division also schedules the use and rental of all School buildings, Town 
and School fields, and the Town House function hall for non-profit groups, private organizations, 
individuals, and Town and School activities. The Field House, Dunn Gymnasium, and fields at 
Andover High School and West Middle School are scheduled by the School Athletic 
Department. 

FACILITIES SERVICES ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued support to Town and School energy conservation initiatives. 

Continued program to improve custodial efficiency and cost savings with new labor 

saving equipment and cleaning products. 

Ongoing custodial training on methods and procedures. 

Coordinated meetings with leaders of all private youth sports and Town officials to 

support field maintenance, scheduled programs, and special projects. 

RENTAL ACTIVITY 

The rental numbers reflect the actual permits issued and entered into the accounting system. 
For every rental request received, a permit is issued and an invoice is generated. 

SCHOOLS 

School rentals continued to fill the ten schools in Town. Growth was seen in the Department 
of Community Services, Youth Services and School enrichment program uses. There was a 



52 



slight increase in rental permits as a result of making accommodations for the SHED program in 
the schools when their building flooded. December through April Vacation only two schools 
were available for use in the evening All schools are available for gym use only after 6:00PM 
and the open schools accommodate mostly Town and School programs. Weekend use of schools 
is not permitted during this timeframe. 

FIELDS 

Town fields were rented to capacity each season in 2010. The High School, Department of 
Community Services and Andover Youth Services programs continued to expand. All Youth 
and Adult Leagues were once again asked to maintain their programs at their current size, as 
there is no field space available for program expansion. 

ANDOVER TOWN HOUSE 

The function hall at the Andover Town House is available for rental seven days per week. 
In addition to various private rentals, the Department of Community Services is the most 
frequent weekday user, and also uses the hall for various evening and weekend events. Andover 
Youth Services regularly schedules concerts, dances, and other events at the Town House. The 
Andover Senior Center also hosts social events at the Town House each year. 

FACILITIES SERVICES STATISTICS 

2008 2009 2010 

Schools 

Town Buildings 

Fields 

Total Permits Issued 692 730 730 



558 


594 


601 


70 


63 


83 


64 


73 


63 



53 



PLANT AND FACILITIES STATISTICS 



TOWN BUILDING 
RENTAL PERMITS 

(Includes Town Hall & Sr. Ctr.) 



1UU 

1.40. 




1 ~)n - 




1ZU 

1 nn 


ioo 95 100 


80 - 
60 - 
40 - 
20 - 
- 














70 


83 












63 






— 







































FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 









SCHOOL BUILDING 










i 




RENTAL PERMITS 


1 nnn 








1,UUU 

Qnn 








yuu 






p.nn 








ouu 






7nn 








/uu 


581 


592 SSR 594 601 


500 - 






485 
























400 - 
300 - 































200 - 

100 - 
n 






























u 




iii 


FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 



FIELD RENTAL PERMITS 

(Excludes Rec Park as of FY07) 



J.UU 

1 A.C\ 


134 -n? 


120 - 
100 - 
80 - 
60 - 
40 - 
20 - 
- 




















85 


73 










64 








63 





































FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 



J 



SALE OF GRAVE SITES 



120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 

60 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 





1-1-1 — 












81 












C3 


56 56 












48 


/-- 


— 




































































FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of 
life by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (liquid and 
solid) and provide safe travel on our road network. 



ENGINEERING DIVISION 

The Engineering Division performed work in 2010 for various construction projects such 
as: drainage improvements on Maple Avenue, Alderbrook Road and upcoming drainage 
improvements on Mary Lou Lane and sewer construction on Lincoln Street. Bridge repairs and 
safety improvements were completed on Stevens Street which included abutment repairs, 
installing scour protection, new sidewalk, drainage, guardrail and fencing. 

Assistance was provided to the Highway Division during road paving work, various 
drainage and sidewalk repairs. Assistance was also given to the Water/Sewer Division during 
various water and sewer repairs, including preparation for the water main replacement on Burton 
Farm Drive and Tanglewood Way. 

Work was also performed to continue implementation activities as part of the Town- wide 
program required for compliance with EPA's Phase II Stormwater Management regulations. 
Activity reports from various Town departments involved in the program were documented and 
utilized for preparation of the annual Stormwater Management Report which was submitted to 
EPA in April. 

Maintenance of the GIS system was also performed; updating software; continued 
development of the drainage, water and sewer utility layers; updating the parcel maps for the 
Town Assessor and creating various maps for other Town departments. 

The design of proposed roads and utilities on various Subdivision and Site Plans were 
checked for the Planning Board and inspections of road and utility construction in new 
developments such as: Christian Way, Monette Circle, Northfield Commons and Winterberry 
Lane were performed. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities by 
Columbia Gas Company, Verizon, National Grid, Comcast and other private contractors were 
issued and utility markouts and inspections were performed. This year included new gas mains 
on Foster Circle, Maple Avenue, Riverina Road and Kenilworth Street and new underground 
electric on Windemere Drive. Also, State mandated trench permits were issued as required for 
various trench excavations. Assistance was provided to the Conservation Division for several 
months during an injury recovery period by a staff member. 

The Engineering Division also provided and maintained records of various utilities, street 
excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and road maintenance. 



55 





2008 


2009 


2010 


Storm Drain Design & Construction (ft.") 


800 


1507 


1274 


Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 


4,740 





210 


Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 


2,800 


330 


324 


Water Main Design & Construction (ft.) 







4000 


Streets Resurfaced (miles) 


5.7 


4.7 


5.6 


Street Opening Permits Issued & Inspected 


304 


179 


291 


Assessors Maps updated 


21 


29 


18 


Subdivision Site Plans reviewed (= plans - lots) 


16/44 


14/35 


8/18 


Subdivision Construction Inspections Tests: 


Water mains (ft.) 


3,132 


4,381 


3,539 


Sewer mains (ft) 


1,715 


694 


1.796 


Drain lines (ft.) 


1,517 


454 


3,434 


Sidewalks (ft.) 


2.294 


1,314 


638 


Roads Paved: Binder coarse (ft.) 


1,152 


1,193 


4,086 


Top coarse (ft.) 


S 1.993.00 


S 2,130.00 


S 469.00 


GIS data requests completed 


4 


4 


4 


GIS Map requests completed 


15 


15 


12 


GIS data lavers maintained edited 


11 


10 


13 


Trench Permits issued (new 2009) 


n a 


49 


"0 



fflGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing of approximately 200 miles of existing roads. The Highway Division is also 
responsible for the maintenance of the Town's sidewalk infrastructure. 

The Highway Division is the lead agency responsible for snow and ice removal and flood 
control measures - other Town divisions assist in these operations. 

During the Fall, Spring and Summer months, two street sweepers are continuously kept 
busy cleaning Winter sand off all of the Town's streets and cleaning road construction areas. A 
few days per week the street sweepers start work at 5:00 A.M. to take advantage of low traffic 
and parking conditions especially in business areas. 

The Division also assists the Engineering Division in inspecting new roads prior to 
acceptance as public ways. The Division is responsible for the cleaning and maintenance of all 
storm water culverts and drainage systems including catch basin and pipe cleaning as well as 
maintenance of water courses on public property impaired by beaver dams. 



56 





2008 


2009 


2010 


Number of streets resurfaced 


10 


8 


6 


Total number of miles of road resurfaced 


5.7 





4.95 


Total number of feet of curbs constructed 


6225 


13,500 


10,000 


Catch basins cleaned 


2525 


1530 


1781 


Storm drains/culverts cleaned 


250 


189 


226 


Catch basins repaired 


86 


61 


72 


Storm drains repaired 


25 


18 


32 


Snow storms 


9 


10 


8 


Sanding events 


45 


18 


24 


Signs repaired/installed 


397 


338 


259 


Masonry wall repairs 


18 


17 


6 



WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

During 2010, the Water Treatment Plant processed more than 2.5 billion gallons of water 
- a daily average of 6.92 million gallons - to produce over 2 billion gallons of finish water 
delivered to the distribution system. 

To augment available water supplies, 1.7 billion gallons were diverted from the 
Merrimack River to Haggetts Pond through the Fish Brook pump station. The Fish Brook station 
was online for a total of 239 days over the course of the year. The chart below illustrates the 
breakdown of total water consumption. 





2008 


2009 


2010 


Gallons of water treated (in millions) 


2702 


2200 


2548 


Average daily gallons pumped (in million gal.) 


7.3 


6.2 


6.9 


Maximum day (in million gallons) 


13.81 


11.56 


13.7 



57 



2010 Water Comsumption by Type 


Irrigation 
217,398,959 M6 


Agriculture 
670,680 MG,0% 


1 ~}<V _JSw»s888SMHI 


I inniK 


>?^%- ^1 


fe^^S^fcjlSN^ 


Industrial :^*"IH 
312,307,989 MG, ^^ 


I -S3i,946,; ''i-sm 


■■■.■..■ ■ : 

'■V- ' ., .Co;tvr,c c ■■ . .. : 
\ 314.740,149fflH| 


u> 



By maintaining Mass. State Certification for potable and non-potable water analyses for 
chemical and biological parameters in 2010, the laboratory was able to analyze over 500 revenue 
generating samples for neighboring towns and over 500 in-house samples for State reporting. 

During the four compliance periods in 2010, volatile organic compounds, secondary 
contaminants, disinfection byproducts, perchlorate levels, nitrates, and in-organics were 
monitored in the finish water. Monthly testing of bromate and weekly bacteria distribution 
testing was also performed. The triennial lead and copper sampling was done for the distribution 
system and the 95 th percentile result was well below the State's action level. There were no 
violations in any of the required testing. 

The Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2ESWTR) sampling for 
Cryptosporidium was completed in 2010 and the Andover Water Plant was classified as BIN 1 
stating, "No additional treatment is required at this time". A second round of sampling will occur 
in 2016. 

All operators maintained current licensing, including five operators holding 4C licenses, 
three holding 4T licenses and two holding 3D licenses. An annual walk-through was completed 
to assess and upgrade existing safety measures as appropriate. 

In 2010, major projects completed included total roof replacement at WTP, NGRID 
lighting incentive program, and replacement of emergency power controls and software. Hands- 
on training for WTP staff was designed, reviewed and approved by DEP for continuing 
education credits for WTP operators. 



58 



WTP staff also held seats on the New England Water Works Association (NEWWA) 
Disinfection Committee, Residuals Committee and Safety Committee, as well as contributed to 
classes offered by NEWWA on various pertinent topics. WTP staff also maintained membership 
in the NE/MVCC consortium for the purchase of bulk treatment chemicals and collaborated with 
the Greenscapes North Shore Initiative to bring the Greenscapes 2010 Program to Andover in 
fulfillment of Water Management Act and Stormwater Management requirements. 



WATER DISTRIBUTION 

The Water Distribution Division consists of six licensed distribution operators that are 
responsible for the maintenance and repair of the water infrastructure. The distribution system 
consists of 250 miles of water mains, 6" to 24" in diameter, 2,100 fire hydrants for fire 
suppression service, 1 1,000 water service accounts, 4,800 water gate valves and 5 water storage 
tanks. 





2008 


2009 


2010 


Hydrants Repaired 


235 


189 


150 


Hydrants Replaced 


10 


9 


9 


Hydrants Inspected & Serviced 


315 


275 


210 


Hydrants Flushed 


170 


230 


167 


Water Main Breaks Repaired 


19 


26 


18 


House Service Leaks Repaired 


7 


15 


11 


House Services Renewed 


44 


16 


20 


New Water Meter Accounts/Installations 


113 


68 


39 


Old Water Meters Replaced (Town) 


195 


121 


28 


Water Meter Replacement Program 




3947 


6935 


Water Meters bench checked 


8 


12 


6 


Water Shut Offs/Turn On 


127 


285 


418 


Gate & Service Boxes Adjusted 




96 


33 



SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of thirteen 
wastewater pumping stations and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system 
includes 150 miles of sanitary sewers, 6,200 connections and 3,300 sewer manholes. The raw 
sewage discharge from the Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is transported by means of a 
force main and 48" gravity system through the City of Lawrence to the Greater Lawrence 
Sanitary District's Regional Treatment Plant in North Andover for treatment. 



59 



2008 


2009 


2010 


Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 13 


6 


4 


Sewer Main Rodded - Regular Maintenance 125 


140 


62 


Sewer Mains Repaired Replaced 1 


2 


2 


Sewer Mains Rodded - Leased Flusher 


32 


43 



SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 

Andover has its refuse transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to -Energy Plant. 
AMieelabrator. located in North Andover. where the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. 
The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandator}" curbside recycling program for 
newspapers magazines, junk mail, office paper, cardboard, telephone books, paperboard, steel/tin 
metal containers, glass, =1 thru -1 plastics and aluminum containers. The Town negotiated to 
earn a paper credit when the New England index ("Yellow Sheet") price for news #6 is above 
S30 ton. The Town earned a total credit of SI 0.2 15 as a result of this effort. 



2008 2009 


2010 


Tons of residential refuse collected 10,292 ( 9,874 


9,867 


Tons of mixed residential paper 2,327 2,185 


1,917 


Tons of corrusated containers 368 


350 


332 


Tons of slass recvcled 1.000 896 


898 


Tons of steel tin containers recycled 59; 53 | 53 


Tons of =1 thru -1 plastics 59 


CI c^ 


Tons of aluminum materials 59 53 53 


Tons of leaves & grass clipping composted 6.350: 6,875 j 6,525 



60 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



STREET BERM CONSTRUCTION 




WATER TREATED 



3,000 

2.5:: 

2,600 
2,400 

: ::: 



w 2,000 - 



: 5" - 
1,600 
1,400 
1,200 - 
1,000 



" 






J 



18,000 



SOLID WASTE & 
RECYCLING COLLECTION 



6,000 




-h rsi ro 

O O O 

> >- >- 

Q- LL. Li_ 

D GLASS 



o o 
>- >- 



I PAPER 



D REFUSE 



8.0 

7.0 
6.0 
5.0 
4.0 
3.0 

:.: 

1.0 
0.0 



STREET RESURFACING 



- * 




6.0 




Z r W 










4.8 




W J.J 


_: - 


/ 4 - 3 


4.8 










-.£ 








\ / 


i_H 



-h cm m 
o o c 
^ > ^ 



— 



61 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Memorial Hall Library is the informational, educational, and cultural heart of the 
Andover community. The library is the place of first resort for traditional and innovative library 
materials, services, and programs. It also serves as a community platform for information-based 
technological innovation. The library continually strives to maintain a standard of exceptional 
service that contributes to a higher quality of life for all members of the community at every 
stage of their lives. 

Memorial Hall Library is a community partner dedicated to helping the Town of Andover 
and its citizens realize their full potential. Patrons experience the Library as a responsive, vital 
resource meeting their individual needs and offering a memorable and personal library 
experience. Lives are enriched through a lifelong relationship with ideas, art, literature, 
information and technology. 

2010 was the year that e-content hit the mainstream with the force of a Nor'easter. 
Everyone suddenly was interested in ebook readers and ebook content. The Library responded 
by purchasing and making available several proprietary services that offer new ways to share 
downloadable or web-based content with its patrons. These services include: 



Freegal - Free and legal downloadable music in MP3 format 

Safari Tech Books Online - Access to thousands of recent tech titles 

Overdrive Advantage - Downloadable Abode e-titles just for Andover patrons 

Universal Class - Online courses for fun and CE credit 

Novelist Select - Book suggestions within the online catalog 

Rocket Languages - Online language lessons for travelers 

Consumer Reports Online - With reviews, buying tips and user ratings 

Global Road Warrior - Country information 



Other New Services/Improvements 
Public scanning kiosk - Friends Donation 
Replacement of the slate roof & windows 
Print Center - Friends Donation 
Online events calendar and signup 
Re-opening on Thursday nights 



Very Popular Services 

Ability to place requests in the online catalog 

Teen Room 

Museum Passes 

TV and Foreign DVDs 

Children's Programs 



LIBRARY DATA* 


2008 


2009 


2010 


Total Items 


253,375 


253,511 


253,391 


Circulation 


498,736 


530,425 


509,284 


Attendance 


414,323 


407,121 


445,861 


Adult/Teen Programs 


250 


312 


299 


Attendance 


7,063 


7,539 


7,020 


Children's Programs 


318 


445 


461 


Attendance 


7,301 


8,133 


8,884 


Reference Transactions 


64,362 


67,362 


67,195 


Computer Sigups 


55,008 


73,570 


76,124 


Number of Volunteers 


227 


242 


242 


Use of Meeting Rooms 


736 


749 


692 



* Many categories are lower due to the Library being closed on Thursday evenings prior to July 1 st . 



62 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



400,000 r 

350,000 

300,000 

250,000 

200,000 

150,000 

100,000 


BOOKS & PERIODICALS 












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63 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The mission of the Building Division is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the 
Town 's residents and visitors, as well as to protect the value of the historic district and historic 
structures in the Town through the enforcement of State and local laws, by-laws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, Architectural Access Board Rules and Regulations, 
521 CMR, The Zoning Act, Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 33, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings, 
Section 36, BallardVale Historic District Bylaw and Section 37, Chimneys, of Article XII of the 
Town of Andover Code of Bylaws, as well as other applicable Town and State laws and 
regulations. The Building Division reviews all documentation (plans and specifications) 
submitted with applications for permits and issues all permits required for construction and other 
applicable activities for which permits are required by law. The Division performs all required 
site inspections as well as Code mandated safety inspections. The Building Division responds to 
customer inquiries, complaints and emergencies. Finally, the Building Division assists other 
Divisions of the Department of Community Development and Planning, as needed, in their 
permit processing and enforcement and attend Zoning Board of Appeals, Planning Board and 
other Commission meetings when necessary. 

BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICS 



Permit Type 


2008 


2009 


2010 


New Dwellings 


16 


16 


25 


Additions/ Alterations to Single 
Family Dwellings 


768 


755 


909 


New Multi-Family Dwellings 


5 


1 


3 


Additions/Alterations to Multi- 
Family Dwellings 


29 


10 


14 


New Commercial & Industrial 
Buildings 


2 


1 


2 


Additions/Alterations to 
Commercial and Industrial 
Buildings 


150 


129 


109 


Schools/Public Buildings 


16 


20 


14 


Swimming Pools 


19 


11 


18 


Signs, Chimneys, Woodburning 
Stoves, Raze Permits 


95 


71 


92 


Certificates of Inspection 


75 


59 


50 


Zoning Verification 


81 


118 


97 


Total Fees Collected 


$1,373,432 


$739,696 


1,076,325 


Total Estimated Value 


$102,983,523 


$55,919,813 


$80,596,147 



64 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for 
residential, commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the 
investigation of accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for 
lighting, power, fire alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of 
equipment for emergency power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards 
and similar equipment. The Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code 
and inspects the corrective work for protection of the users and cooperates with the various 
electric companies that service the area. 

2008 2009 2010 

Electrical Permits 1147 911 1151 

Fees Collected $106,458 $83,474 $127,209 



PLUMBING AND GAS 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the 
Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conducted as necessary to ensure 
compliance with State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or 
reported to the proper authorities. 



2008 2009 2010 



Plumbing Permits 


701 


533 


696 


Plumbing Fees Collected 


$41,007 


$34,199 


$46,732 


Gas Permits 


588 


458 


625 


Gas Fees Collected 


$28,517 


$23,111 


$33,089 


Seals 


2 


8 


1 


Seal Fees Collected 


$50 


$480 


$10 



65 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 

The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover's natural resources 
and to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land. 

The Conservation Division is responsible for the protection of Andover's rivers, lakes 
and wetlands, and provides staff support to the Andover Conservation Commission. The 
Commission's principal duties include enforcement and administration of the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protection Act and the Andover Wetlands Protection Bylaw (regulation of residential, 
industrial and commercial development activity in or near flood plains, water bodies, and 
wetland areas). The Commission is also responsible for the acquisition and maintenance of 
Town-owned Conservation Land, comprising close to over two-thousand acres of public open 
space. The Commission manages the volunteer Conservation Overseers, Conservation-based 
Eagle Scout Projects, the periodic up-date of the Andover's Open Space and Recreation Plan and 
serves as the liaison to other official and informal organizations concerned with conservation and 
open space preservation. The Conservation Commission consists of seven volunteer members 
who are appointed annually by the Board of Selectmen to staggered three-year terms. 

In 2010, the Commission bid farewell to Vice Chairman Howard Kassler and 
Commissioner Alan French after many years of volunteer service. Floyd Greenwood and Kevin 
Porter were appointed as new Commission members to fill these vacancies. 

The Commission continues to support the network of volunteer Conservation Overseers. 
The Commission is actively engaged in many large projects including the proposed 1-93 Corridor 
Project, exploring options for the restoration of the Shawsheen River and improving passive 
recreation on the newly acquired Foster's Pond Reservation and other Town reservations. 
Property improvement was proposed along the Merrimack River Trail and plans are being 
developed for the replacement of a failing footbridge. The Commission is actively working 
toward establishing a dog exercising area on Wood Hill. 

Conservation Land Improvement & Community Outreach 

The Conservation Division had another great year for land improvement, including the 
cataloging of nearly 2,000 acres of Conservation Land by Andy Menendez. Volunteers cleared 
new trails and re-opened old ones on the Pustell Reservation, Wood Hill Reservation, Bald Hill 
Reservation and the Virginia Hammond Reservation. With the assistance of the Department of 
Public Works, trees were cleared and a new parking area was constructed, establishing a safer 
parking area for visitors. Various hikes on conservation land were sponsored by the Commission 
including one on the Fosters Pond Reservation prior to the Town Meeting vote. Various 
conservation land signs were posted on many of the properties. 

The Commission enjoys one of the largest partnerships with local Boy Scout 
organizations in the State. In 2010, several advanced Scout projects were completed together 
with projects and activities initiated by Bob Decelle, Special Project Manager for the 
Conservation Commission, and his volunteer team. These projects and activities included a 
camping area and program at Serio's Grove with a celebration of the Winter Solstice on 



66 



December 21 st ; a kiosk,tables and benches at the Bald Hill-Wood Hill Reservation; bridges on 
the Doyle Link and Pustell Reservations; a parking area on the Virginia Hammond Reservation; 
improvements to Rogers Dell and a camping area cleared on the Jenkins Quarry Reservation for 
scout camping purposes. 

The Commission continued with an innovative successful program using grazing goats to 
control invasive growth on conservation land. These efforts included the use of dairy goats to 
eat and clear specifically bittersweet and buckthorn from the Virginia Hammond Reservation's 
meadow habitat. This is a vital project as many wet meadows are lost due to increased 
forestation, most frequently of invasive shrub growth. These efforts were augmented by 
continuing to release purple loosestrife eating beetles in conservation wetlands in order to 
encourage natural indigenous growth of obligate wetland plants, ensuring a diverse community 
of flora and fauna for the Town of Andover. 

Open Space Plan 

The Town's Open Space Plan (updated in January) was accepted the Commonwealth in 
March. Copies will be available at the Town Offices and Memorial Hall Library. 
Commissioners Gail Ralston and Alix Driscoll and GIS Coordinator Laura DeGroot have been 
instrumental in this process. The plan provides a strong guide for the establishment of new 
active and passive recreation opportunities in town. The Commission is in the process of apply 
for matching grants money from the State for the Town as a result of the plan's acceptance. 

Shawsheen River Restoration 

The Commission continues to look at several options to restore the Shawsheen River. 
The Commission's State and Federal partners completed a Feasibility Study and the project's 
permitting process is expected to begin in 2011. The funding for this program has come from 
State, Federal and private sources at no cost to the Town. 

Robert Pustell Award 

The Commission instituted the Robert Pustell Award in memory of Robert Pustell, a 
former life-long Commissioner and Chairman of the Conservation Commission. The first award 
was presented to Robert Decelle for his outstanding contributions to conservation land 
management in Andover. 

Encroachment Project 

The Commission began research and resolution to encroachments by residents on land 
under the custody and control of the Commission. 

Deer Management Program 

The Commission joined other communities in an effort to control the deer population on 
the Town's conservation and Water Department land. The pilot bow-only hunting program, in 



67 



which 25 residents participated was successful and implemented with strict oversight by the 
Conservation Commission and the Andover Police Department. 

New Restrictions/ Properties 

The purchase of conservation land at 30 & 32 Willard Circle (known as the Foster's Pond 
Reservation) was finalized in 2010. The Commission was awarded $269,000 in State funding 
for the purchase. This land acquisition will provide the Town with pond frontage. 



CONSERVATION DIVISION STATISTICS 





2008 


2009 


2010 


Conservation Commission Meetings 


25 


25 


27 


Public Hearings & Public Meetings 


128 


136 


131 


Abbreviated Notices of Resource Area 
Delineation 


4 


8 


2 


Orders of Conditions Issued 


23 


22 


16 


Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 


-0- 


1 


2 


Certificates of Compliance Issued 


20 


33 


26 


Determinations of Applicability Issued 


43 


72 


54 


Extension Permits 


11 


16 


17 


Notification of Satisfactory Completion of 
Work 


29 


32 


22 


Findings of Significance Issued 


13 


8 


14 


Enforcement Orders Issued 


9 


8 


6 


Emergency Certifications 


1 


18 


5 


Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 


-0- 


-0- 


14.5 


Wetland Filing Fees Collected 


16,775.00 


$20,337.50 


$13,835.00 



68 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division is responsible for ensuring the protection of the public and 
environmental health. The inspectional staff supervise the inspection and public health education 
programs in matters dealing with the State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code, 
including complaint investigation, wastewater disposal, food safety, swimming pool operations, 
recreational camp programs, and many other services. The Public Health Nursing staff is 
primarily responsible for all medical clinical administrative matters, including communicable 
disease investigations, vaccination programs, and health promotion programs. The Director of 
Public Health serves as staff supervisor, ensuring that public health programs are offered in a 
coordinated manner, and is the liaison to various boards. The Director designs, programs, and 
implements policies as proposed by the Andover Board of Health to meet the health needs of the 
community. The Board of Health consists of three volunteer members appointed by the Town 
Manager for staggered three-year terms. 

Issues of note from 2010 include: 

The H1N1 Influenza Pandemic of Fall 2009 to Spring of 2010 required an enormous 

outlay of time and energy by the staff as they provided public education and then 

immunizations. 

The Public Health Nurses continued their Shingles Vaccination Program through a 

generous grant from the Andover Home for Aged Persons. This program has served over 

485 residents over the age of 60 and has been held out as an example to area 

communities. Public Health Nurse Jane Morrissey and Assistant Public Director Joanne 

Martel received a State-wide award for this work. 

The Health Division is the host agency for the Greater River Valley Medical Reserve 

Corps which is part of the National Citizen Corps Program. There are approximately 175 

volunteers from the seven member communities who assist with health-related responses 

in the community. 

Sanitarian Daniel Tremblay retired in February after 39 years of dedicated service to the 

Town. 



HEALTH DIVISION STATISTICS 

Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Food Inspections 
Environmental Inspections 
Complaints Received 
Administrative Hearings 
Total Permits Issued 
Fees Collected 



2008 



2009 



2010 



14 


12 


12 


291 


243 


269 


339 


453 


278 


388 


346 


322 


110 


114 


138 


6 


2 


4 


1347 


1337 


1309 


$151,032.27 


$140,034.48 


$145,244.11 



69 



HEALTH CLINIC STATISTICS 

2008 
Outreach Clinics 
Attendance 
Senior Center Clinics 
Attendance 
Office Visits 
Home Visits 

Recreational Camps for Children/Clinical Inspection 24 
Influenza Immunization 
Pneumonia Immunization 
Cholesterol Screening Clinics 
Attendance 

Mantoux Tuberculin testing 
Positive Reactor Follow Up 
T.B. Clinic Case History, Appts. & Follow-Up 
Latent T.B. Infection Reports 
Zostavax (Shingles) Vaccine Clinics Attendance 
*(Influenza Immunization figures include H1N1 immunizations.) 



2009 



2010 



18 


20 


21 


197 


209 


236 


50 


50 


51 


556 


531 


544 


207 


280 


255 


25 


27 


20 


i 24 


21 


18 


666 


3485* 


1776 


20 


13 


20 


10 


5 


3 


44 


25 


27 


24 


11 


12 


7 


1 


8 


46 


17 


31 


19 


11 


27 


155 


78 


80 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 





2008 


2009 


2010 


Animal Bites 


28 


25 


31 


Babesiosis 





1 


1 


Chicken Pox 


13 


11 


8 


Campylobacter 


10 


7 


5 


Cryptosporidiosis 


1 


1 


3 


Dengue Fever 








1 


E.coli 0157.H7/Shega toxin 


3 


1 


1 


Ehrlichiosis/HGA 


2 


3 


6 


Giardia 





3 


5 


Hepatitis A 





1 





Hepatitis B 


4 


6 


10 


Hepatitis C 


5 


13 


14 


Influenza A 


1 


14 


1 


Invasive Gr A Strep 








1 


Legionellosis 








1 


Lyme Disease (Confirmed/Probable) 


17 


44 


39 


Lyme Disease (Suspect) 


91 


76 


27 


Meningitis (Viral) 


2 





2 


Pertussis 


1 


1 





Salmonella 


5 


9 


6 


Shigella 


2 








Strep Pneumonia 


4 


3 


2 


Group B Strep 


1 


1 





Tuberculosis (Active) 


1 


1 






70 



2 





1 


1 








29 


14 


26 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES (Cont.) 

2008 2009 2010 

Tuberculosis (Suspect) 
Vibrio 
Suspect Disease Requiring Follow-Up 

HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 

The Healthy Communities Tobacco Control Program, a State-funded entity, is a 
collaborative made up of Boards of Health from twelve communities which are charged with the 
responsibility of enforcing state regulations and laws, and Andover's bylaws that prohibit the 
sale of tobacco products to minors. With Andover as the lead agency, the collaborative includes 
Haverhill, Lynnfield, Newburyport, Dracut, Methuen, Middleton, North Andover, North 
Reading, Reading, Stoneham and Topsfield. 

At one point, funding allowed for quarterly checks to ensure that retailers were not 
selling tobacco products to minors, but current funding now allows only for checks one time per 
year, along with physical inspections of the retailers. The grant expires in the spring of 201 1, and 
plans are being made to renew the funding. 

GREATER LAWRENCE BIOTERRORISM PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Greater Lawrence Public Health Coalition is comprised of seven community health 
departments including Andover, North Andover, Lawrence, Methuen, North Reading, Reading 
and Lynnfield working together to improve both regional and community capability to respond 
to public health emergencies. The Town of Andover serves as the fiscal agent for the Coalition. 

Coalition activities are funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Cooperative 
Agreement on Public Health Preparedness and Response for Bioterrorism through a grant 
awarded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. In 2009 and 2010, the coalition 
worked regionally to respond to the H1N1 Influenza outbreak, helping members with flu clinics 
and conducting public education campaigns. Additionally, the coalition continues to speak 
regionally to public health issues, including food protection, housing issues and vector borne 
diseases. 

GREATER RIVER VALLEY MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS 

The Greater River Valley Medical Reserve Corps (GRV MRC) was formed in 2007. The 
GRV MRC consists of the same seven communities as the Preparedness Coalition, and is a 
partner program of Citizen Corps, a national network of volunteers. Local MRC units are 
community-based and function as a way to organize and utilize both medical and non-medical 
volunteers. These volunteers supplement existing local emergency and public health resources. 
Activities are funded by grants from the CDC, Massachusetts Department of Public Health and 
other National/Federal grant sources. The GRV MRC currently boasts a membership of 
approximately 175 volunteers. 



71 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of the 
Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the recommendations of 
the Master Plan. 

Economic Development 

Downtown : The Planning Division implemented several downtown initiatives: an Island 
Adoption Program was put into practice to beautify several new transportation islands and a bylaw to 
allow private flower urns and planters on the sidewalk in front of a storefront's location. The 
downtown businesses along with multiple Town Departments held a very successful Andover Day 
celebration. The downtown welcomed several new businesses in 2009: Brasserie 28 Restaurant 
(formerly Bin 28), Syndeo Technologies, Metamorphosis Home & Gifts, Soiree Invitations, Lyn 
Evans Clothing and Salon 7 Elm. 

Town Yard : The Planning Division's long range economic initiatives for the downtown include 
the Town Yard relocation and redevelopment project. The Town Yard Task Force (created in 2007), 
is charged with evaluating the reuse and redevelopment of the Town Yard and to consider relocating 
the existing facility that is in very poor condition. Utilizing grant funds, consultant's evaluated the 
property, the market and potential redevelopment. The final report recommends relocating the 
existing facility and to prepare the area for redevelopment through a controlled process that reflects 
the character of a Central Business District. Please visit the following website: 
http ://ando verma. go v/planning/to wnyard/ for more information. 

The Junction/Route 93 Development Area : The Planning Division plays a pivotal role in facilitating 
this project which may be one of the largest potential employment centers in Massachusetts. 
Achieving an interchange has the potential to unlock hundreds of acres of currently landlocked and 
underutilized industrial land and allow the expansion of existing industry in the area that is 
constrained by poor access to the interstate. Community leaders from Andover, Tewksbury and 
Wilmington, are developing a land use vision for the redevelopment of the area through a Form- 
Based Code (FBC). The goal of the FBC is to help facilitate more efficient land utilization, provide 
opportunities for increased tax revenues and economic development. Please visit 
http://andoverma.gov/planning/i93/ for more information. 

Housing 

The Housing Trust Fund Board of Trustees (AHTF) awards approximately $60,000 each year 
in grant money through efforts of the Planning Division and the North Shore HOME Consortium. 
Since its inception, over $180,000 has been awarded to Andover and has created nine permanently 
affordable housing units scattered throughout the Town. 

The Planning Division continues to monitor the existing affordable housing stock so that 
units are not lost. Each time there is a resale of an existing affordable unit, the Planning Division is 
actively involved in order to maintain Andover' s official Subsidized Housing Inventory with the 
State. 

Sustainabilitv 

The Andover Green Advisory Board working closely with the Planning Division in 
spearheading efforts to have the Town of Andover designated as a Green Community by the State's 



72 



Department of Energy Resources. Andover was awarded $ 1 60,329 for its efforts. The funds will be 
allocated for various energy efficiency upgrades to reduce Andover' s operating budget. 

Master Plan Revision 

The Planning Division staff has initiated the update of the 1 992 Town of Andover Master 
Plan. The Master Plan includes the Vision for Andover and the Goals and Objectives for Land Use, 
Housing, Economic Development, Transportation, Open Space, Municipal Facilities and Services, 
and Cultural and Historic Resources. The Master Plan will be completed in 201 1 with public input 
and additional comment. Please visit http ://ando verma. go v/planning/ to view the current draft. 

Planning Division (General Responsibilities) 

The Planning Division staff worked on open space preservation, created Geographical 
Information System (GIS) maps for various Town departments, negotiated with numerous 
subdivision and site plan proposals to achieve the best possible development on the Town's 
diminishing vacant lands, continued to encourage Low Impact Development techniques for all new 
development proposals to enhance compatibility with existing neighborhoods and mitigated 
environmental impacts to the greatest extent possible. The percentage of staff task distribution is as 
follows: 44% - Planning Board responsibilities; 26% -Economic Development issues; 10% - 
Master Plan Revision; 9% - Sustainable Initiatives; 6% - Housing issues and 5% - General issues 
such as GIS, Low Impact Development, etc. 



PLANNING DIVISION STATISTICS 

Planning Board Meetings 
Public Hearings Held 
Subdivision-Related Projects 
ANR Plans 
Site Plan Reviews 
Special Permits Issued 
Warrant Articles Reported 
Revenues Generated 



2009 2010 



20 


23 


85 


74 


20 


22 


9 


27 


2 





14 


5 


19 


25 


$43,407 


$18,730 



73 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and 
the Town's Zoning Bylaw. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in the 
Selectmen's Conference Room at the Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street. The Board of Selectmen 
appoints five regular members and four associate members. The public hearings by the Board 
are the result of applications in the following areas: 

A Variance from the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw; 

A Special Permit under the Zoning Bylaw; 

A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings or other 

Administrative official; 

A modification or an extension of a decision; or 

Permission to construct low or moderate-income housing within the Town of 

Andover (Comprehensive Permit, M.G.L. Chapter 40B). 

Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The 
Chairman, in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations, conducts public 
hearings. Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each 
property in question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence presented 
at the hearing, and the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town 
Clerk and recorded at the Registry of Deeds upon completion of the statutory appeal period. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS STATISTICS 



ZBA Meetings: 


2008 


2009 


2010 


Public Hearing Meetings 


16 


18 


13 


Deliberations Only 


1 


3 


2 


Cases Filed 


69 


46 


46 


Cases Approved 


49 


29 


35 


Cases Denied/Moot 


5 


10 


4 


Cases Withdrawn 


10 


4 


5 


Continuances 


1 


3 


3 


Fees Collected 


$25,338 


$13,884 


$13,400 



74 



BUILDING STATISTICS 



SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 



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950 
900 
850 
800 
750 
700 
650 
600 
550 
500 



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$1,700,000 

$1,500,000 

$1,300,000 

$1,100,000 

$900,000 

$700,000 

$500,000 { 

$300,000 



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PLANNING AND PUBLIC HEALTH STATISTICS 



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2003 
2004 
2005 


2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 


□ Preliminary Subdivision 


□ Definitive Subdivision 


■ Site Plan Reviews 


□ ANR Plans 



4,250 
3,750 
3,250 
2,750 
2,250 
1,750 
1,250 
750 
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VACCINATIONS 

(2009 Includes 1,224 H1N1 Vacs.) 











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76 



DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Division of Community Services provides the residents of Andover with a myriad of 
social, educational, cultural, and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and 
accessibility for all ages. Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and 
incorporate those ideas into valued programs for its citizens now and in the future. 



Community Services, better known as DCS, was established years ago as a traditional 
Recreation Department. As Andover grew, the department embraced a wider mission. Today, the 
Division is comprised of a full-time staff of five, hundreds of part-time adult and student 
employees, vendors, and volunteers who provide over 600 programs, events and trips for our 
residents. The DCS office is located on the second floor of the Andover Town Offices, 36 Bartlet 
Street, and offers customer service from 8:30 am - 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday. Online 
registration for DCS programs is available through the website at www.andoverma. gov/dcs . 

Daytime, after-school, evening, online, vacation and Summer programs are held 
throughout town. DCS utilizes Andover' s fine public and private facilities including the public 
schools, the Greater Lawrence Technical High School, Kid's Club, and the Old Town Hall for its 
programs. Special events and concerts are held in The Park, tennis lessons at Recreation Park, 
adult co-ed Softball leagues on Town fields and swimming and boating programs at Pomps Pond. 
Outdoor sports programs for children are held on fields throughout Town. 

DCS continues to make improvements to Recreation Park and Pomps Pond. Improve- 
ments include the installation of new softball lights, new shelters for Summer programs, 
widening the road for safety purposes, trimming paths in the woods and landscaping to enhance 
the general appearance of the complex. 

Customer service has been improved by streamlining many of the procedures and up- 
dating the appearance of the office. More than 30% of all DCS registrations are being completed 
online allowing for after-hour and weekend registrations. The convenience of online registration 
benefits both the participants and the staff. DCS is expanding their participant base to the 
business community by reaching out to Andover businesses and inviting their employees to 
participate in DCS programs. As Andover continues to grow and change, DCS adapts and 
changes to meet the needs of the community. You may now find them on Facebook and follow 
them on Twitter. 

DCS PROGRAMS 

Classes & Programs 

A comprehensive program booklet is mailed to Andover residents in early January, June 
and September. Information for all programs, trips and special events for the upcoming season 
are found in the booklets. The current booklet and registration information can also be found at 

www.andoverma.gov/dcs . 



77 



Statistics for class participation: 

Winter/Spring 225 classes 2,003 participants 

Summer 180 classes 3,052 participants 

■ Fall 200 classes 1,943 participants 

Community Trips 

Each season DCS offers trips to a variety of locations. Some favorites include New York 
City shopping at the holidays, Washington DC for the Cherry Blossoms, Foxwoods Casino, 
Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard, the Lakes Region, and Boston for the Pops and Fenway Park. 

Special Events 

DCS coordinates special events throughout the year which have become memorable 
family favorites. These programs are offered at minimal cost to residents and include a Spring 
Egg Hunt, Spring and Fall Town Yard Sales, adult Ballroom Dances, a free Summer Concert 
Series, Preschool Park Events, and the Father/Daughter Holly Ball. 

Sports Leagues 

Preschool leagues for children ages 4-6 include Fall and Spring Kickin' Kids Soccer, 
Spring Sandlot T-Ball, and Lil' Hoopsters basketball offered in the Winter. Over 600 pre-school 
age children participated in these leagues in 2010. 

Elementary and middle school children participate in youth basketball, the Bob French 
League and girls 7 th & 8 th Grade Travel Basketball in the Winter. In the Spring, DCS offered a 
Lacrosse league for ages 5-8. Over 650 elementary and middle school children participated in 
these programs. 

Adult Co-ed Softball Leagues are organized through DCS. Andover residents and 
business employees have the opportunity to join one of the 24 teams in the Summer and 12 
teams in the Fall. Approximately 800 adults participate in this league each year. 

Arts Programs 

DCS Arts Programs are offered throughout the year for all ages. Children's programs 
feature opportunities in theater arts with Confetti Kids, Children's Studio for the Arts and 
Summer Theater Ensemble. Additionally, there is a host of art, dance and music lessons for both 
children and adults. 

Summer Program 

DCS offers a variety of exciting programs to keep the children of Andover engaged 
during their Summer vacation. Listed below are just a few of the many programs offered: 



78 



Drop-In Playground - housed at Red Park and available to children entering Grades 1-7 
offering seven weeks of age-appropriate activities such as arts & crafts, games, sports and 
swimming. 

All-Day Discovery - a full-day, seven-week program for children entering grades K-6 
which also offers an internship program for middle school students. 

■ Various sports programs offered such as Warrior Tennis, Warrior Football, Warrior 
Baseball, Warrior Soccer, Beach Volleyball, Track, Fencing and Golf. 

Half day pre-school programs for children ages 3-6 explore sports in a non-competitive 
environment. 

RECREATION FACILITIES 

Recreation Park 

This large scenic park off Abbot Street is open to the public for a wide variety of seasonal 
recreational activities. Facilities include four lighted tennis courts, a ballfield with lights for night 
games, lighted inline skate rink, picnic areas, children's play area, a sledding hill, and restrooms. 
Whether you're looking to host a relaxing family picnic or an action packed birthday party, 
Recreation Park is the perfect place for your event! 

Pomps Pond 

Located off Abbot Street, Pomps Pond offers a spacious beach area, picnic grounds, 
children's playground area, canoeing and kayaking rentals, sailing and recreational and instruct- 
tional swimming. The complex, open mid- June through mid-August, includes a bathhouse with 
showers, rest rooms, changing facilities, concession stand and first aid station. Andover residents 
may purchase beach stickers at the Pond. Non-residents are charged the daily rate. Three 
hundred fifty residents purchased stickers in 2010. Typically 150 people enjoy the Pond each 
day. 



79 



DCS STATISTICS 



Total DCS Revenues - FY10 
$1,044,500 



$161,000 
15% 




$508,000 

49% 



□ Fall Programs 

H Winter/Spring Programs 

□ Summer Programs 
II Pomps Pond 



$328,000 

31% 



DCS REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$550,000 
$500,000 
$450,000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 
$150,000 
$100,000 
$50,000 
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80 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and 
advocate for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of 
elders in the community, and to provide a focal point in the community (Senior Center) where 
these programs and services can be easily accessed by elders and their families. 

The Growing Community of Residents of "Senior" Status 

As the number of Andover residents presently or soon to be 60 steadily increases, we face 
the challenge of identifying resources for an increasingly diverse elder population. The number 
of Andover residents aged 60+ has increased 40% in the past three years. How prepared are we 
to meet the various needs of a population whose ages range from 60 to over 100? What 
resources will be needed to support our oldest seniors living independently in the community? 
As a community, will we be ready as more residents seek assistance, either for themselves or for 
family members? 

Elder Services will continue to create and provide specialized programs and services in 
fulfillment of its mission as laid out by the Council on Aging following the charge of the Town 
Meeting of March 12, 1966: 

> Identify the total needs of the community's elderly population; 

> Educate the community and enlist support and participation of all citizens about these needs; 

> Design, promote or implement services to fill these needs, or coordinate existing services in 
the community; 

> Promote and support any other programs which are designed to assist elderly in the 
community; and 

> Enlist and develop capable volunteers and professional leadership for the purposes stated in 
this Article (35). 

To accomplish these goals, programs are designed to promote good health and nutrition, 
access to services and community life, financial and personal independence and to combat 
isolation. An emphasis on Health, Wellness & Nutrition programs provides a variety of 
opportunities to maintain, enhance and improve one's health. Continuing goals and objectives 
focus on improving social services, educational and recreational programs, intergenerational and 
volunteer opportunities and expanding outreach in the community. 

Challenges 

Meet the needs of the growing and changing population 

60+ 1 in 6 

50+ 1 in 3 

85+ Continues to grow in number and need for services 



81 



Increasingly diverse population - age 60 - 1 00+ 

Living longer and staying in the community 

Meet increased need with fewer resources 

Reductions in State and Federal programs shifts demand to Local level 

Staff training and Accreditation 

Space and cost of custodians 



Accomplishments 



Continued growth and interest in volunteer opportunities in all Town Departments and 
Schools. The value of volunteer services to the Town was over $800,000. 

Requests for transportation services, including weekly shopping trips and medical 
transportation continue to increase. 

Provided one-on-one counseling and several informational forums to over 1,000 
individuals affected by changes in their insurance plans. 

Collaborative programming: 

~ Addison Gallery of American Art 

~ Conservation Commission and Commission on Disability in the development of a 

Community Garden 
~ Memorial Hall Library on multi-faceted cultural programming 

~ Andover Historical Society for a monthly High Tea and sharing of Andover 

stories 
~ TAVAH in reviving the "Crystal Ballroom" at the Town House 

~ Northern Essex Community College programs including Campaigns & Elections, 

Vampires are Sexy and Gadgets & Gizmos 
~ Andover/North Andover YMCA Water Programs 

~ MIT Age Lab regarding research on driving, mobility and adaptations. They 

brought their Smart Car to Andover for one of two off-site demonstrations in the 

State. 



82 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



ELDER SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$160,000 

$140,000 

$120,000 

$100,000 

$80,000 

$60,000 

$40,000 

$20,000 







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$500,000 
$450,000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 



VALUE OF ELDER SERVICES 
VOLUNTEER SERVICE 



$494,019 




$347,910 



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$375,000 
$350,000 
$325,000 
$300,000 
$275,000 
$250,000 
$225,000 
$200,000 
$175,000 
$150,000 
$125,000 
$100,000 



TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 
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30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
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83 



DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES 

The AYS aims to provide young people useful experiences to promote healthy growth and 
development. It is our goal to build a network of affordable, accessible, safe, and challenging 
youth programs that appeal and respond to the diverse interests of young adolescents and their 
families. 



Andover Youth Services (AYS) was established to address the need for an increase in 
recreational, educational, social and support programs for the middle school and high school 
populations within the community. AYS supplies the youth of Andover with programs, services, 
and activities throughout the year. AYS provides a direct link that connects youth to their 
community. Andover' s young people face many challenges and it is our mission to develop and 
maintain a program that has the ability to be flexible and encourages all youth to use their 
creativity and spontaneity in positive ways. 

The support piece of AYS has continued to flourish with an increase in the community 
service program, our after school adventure-based program, drop in and flexible office hours, 
court-related services, volunteer and intern opportunities, hospital visits, referrals, college and 
employment, recommendations, fundraising for youth programs, crisis intervention, outreach, 
24-hour emergency response, parent support and education, discussion groups and specialized 
in-school groups. 

AYS events provided a community venue for young people to expose their creative 
talents. The 12 th annual "Keep It Wild" Fashion Show, opening of the new Skate Park section 
and numerous concerts and dances attracted thousands of youth and presented unique 
entertainment opportunities for the Town of Andover. 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. Andover Youth Services remains dedicated to establishing a community-wide 
network of supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following 
organizations, creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for 
youth. Each of the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services and 
outreach to those young people who are not connected positively to the community of Andover: 
Andover Youth Council, Andover Youth Foundation, Friends of Andover Youth, Andover 
Community Advocates for Resources, Education and Support (CARES), Gender Equity 
Committee and AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP). 

AYS receives ideas and concepts directly from the young people themselves and then 
takes these ideas and empowers the youth to make them happen. By interacting alongside young 
people, whether it is handing out flyers or working towards a new Youth Center, the programs 
the Youth Services creates and implements are immediate reflections of what the youth want and 
need. By staying true to our philosophy, AYS will continue to provide a diverse range of 
activities, events, groups, and programs for all young people of Andover. 



84 



AYS PROGRAMS 

The Andover Youth Services Summer Program - Legacy - May to August 

Legacy was an eight-week program open to all Andover youth eleven to eighteen years of 
age. Young people at these ages are in transition from childhood to adulthood and are in 
various stages of cognitive, physical, emotional, social and moral development. They need 
guidance and support through this stage of self-discovery, expanding horizons and emerging 
independence. AYS understands their developmental needs and responds with a lineup of 
activities, clinics, adventures, field trips and community service opportunities that appeal to 
the individual interests of young people. Over 1,700 young people received a chance to 
express themselves and share their experiences in a positive, supporting environment. The 
program offered 78 trips, adventures and services and encouraged them to participate and 
experience activities that were new, diverse and challenging. 

Ultimate Frisbee - Year round 

On the youth level, middle school boys and girls learned the multiple throws, offense and 
defense strategies and other skills in this fast-paced sport. The team competed in a huge 
tournament in Amherst, MA and a few games against neighboring communities. 
Additionally, AYS continued its support of the high school ultimate team which does not fall 
under the athletic budget. Ultimate involves over 1 20 kids each Spring. 

Field Hockey - Summer - Fall 
AYS continued to expand a middle school girls' field hockey team that competed against 
neighboring towns and brought high school students into a mentoring role by providing 
instruction on stick-handling, passing and other elements of the game. 

Wrestling - November - March 
Varsity wrestling continued its growth at the high school under the guidance and support of 
AYS. The team sent several wrestlers to the State Tournament after competing in their 
second varsity season. The youth program laid the foundation for future wrestling success 
with 40 young people in competition. 

Basketball & Volleyball Open Gym - Year round 

In the AYS tradition of taking new ideas and generating them into programs, a basketball and 
volleyball Open Gym became an instant success. The programs provided some evening 
recreation opportunities for young people not involved in other extracurricular activities. 

■ Andover Snowboard Club and Night Riders - December to April 

The Andover Snowboard Club is a group of skiers and riders who share a love for the snow. 
This year the group traveled to Killington, Mt. Snow, Pats Peak, Crotched Mountain and Jay 
Peak. The Night Riders Program expanded to involve over 40 middle school students in the 
Friday night expeditions to Pats Peak. 

Lacrosse - Year round 

Since 1997, AYS has continued to improve upon Andover's lacrosse program. The youth 
league engaged over 350 young people in the Spring sport that competes against neighboring 



85 



communities. AYS implemented several Summer lacrosse programs due to the 
overwhelming demand for year-round lacrosse. Youth Services produced successful 
beginners programs for youths ages 8-10 and pick-up leagues for middle school boys and 
girls who wanted to improve their skills or learn the sport for the first time. AYS funded and 
implemented a Girls' lacrosse team into the high school in the Spring of 2003 and a boys and 
girls' Freshman team in the Spring of 2004. Lacrosse has been a year-round effort offering 
clinics, introductory sessions, and pick up sessions. AYS continues to support this growing 
program by sustaining year-round fundraising efforts, recruiting coaches and volunteers. 

- Afterschool Programs - September to June 

Flag Football, Field Hockey, Street Hockey, Rock Climbing, Spring Open Gym, Ultimate 
Frisbee, Middle School Intramurals, Track program, Volleyball program, Outing Club, 
Bowling Club, etc. 

Vacation Day Programs - September to June 

Developed a variety of program opportunities during the holidays and vacation days for 
middle school and high school students. 

SUPPORT SERVICES - Year round 

~ Green Team - A youth employment program for high school students at Andover High 
School. Each session of the program provides work experience and trains young people in a 
variety of skills including: locating jobs, employee etiquette and rights, self motivation, 
time management, multi-tasking and solid work ethic. By working alongside participants, 
instructors provide positive role models, create connection to something positive, and build 
lasting relationships. An additional component of the program is that the team must 
complete several community service projects. The goal is expose young people to taking a 
proactive approach to making the world a better place, starting with his or her hometown, 
and give back to the community in which they live. Upon completion of the community 
service component, the team is empowered to locate and complete several jobs for citizens, 
local government, and the community at large. At the end of the Summer session, 
participants receive a stipend for their completed tasks. The Green Team fills a void among 
the students by supplying valuable training, mentors, and a source of income to 
disconnected young people. 

~ Community Service - The willingness of young people to serve their community was 
demonstrated thoroughly over the course of the community service days. The young people 
enthusiastically helped community trails by dragging huge logs and boards to build a bog 
bridge, clearing brush and dead trees to create a new trail, and hacking through brush to 
reclaim an overgrown trail. The energy of the youth was focused in a manner that verified 
that young people can make a visible difference in their community. Several groups served 
meals to the homeless at the Cor Unum Soup Kitchen in Lawrence. 

~ Expeditions - Offers a variety of challenging activities for young men and women. AYS 
creates a powerful group by forming trust and building strong friendships/ relationships. The 
young people are challenged mentally, physically, and socially. By participating in this 



86 



group, the youth develop vital self-confidence that carries into every aspect of their lives and 
community. 

Other year-round support services offered by AYS staff are: Drop-in and flexible office 
hours, Court-related services, Volunteer and intern opportunities, Hospital visits, Referrals, 
Employment network, College and employment recommendations, Fundraising for Youth 
programs, Crisis intervention - Outreach, 24-hour emergency response, Parent support and 
education, Discussion groups - specialized in-school groups and Transportation. 

EVENTS 

"Keep it Wild" Fashion Show - December to June 

The 12 th annual "Keep It Wild" Fashion Show provided 20 designers and over 80 models 
a venue to expose their creative talents. Over the course of six months, student designers 
attend clinics, have fabric shopping days, eventually sew outfits and recruit models to 
showcase their work. The magnitude of the show requires that the Town House be 
transformed into an atmosphere of style and fashion with pulsing music and a 1 00 foot 
runway. Five hundred people turned out for this unique June event. 

Other Events 

Making Connections 

Service Club Annual Barbeque 

Concerts/Shows - Year round 

AYS collaborates with a variety of young people who are interested in putting on 
concerts, dances and special shows. Each show has its own particulars and on average 
one to two shows are produced per month. Examples in 2010: High school and middle 
school Dances, Concerts in the Park, etc. 

ANDOVER COMMUNITY SKATE PARK - May to December 

The Andover Community Skate Park, a positive and safe environment, is open to all ages 
and abilities. It promotes and encourages individual expression and learning. The Park 
provides a positive atmosphere centered around respect for other and, most importantly, 
having fun. 

■ Paul King Skate-a-thon - The annual event was developed to honor Paul King, an avid 
skater who passed away in a skydiving accident. The event is 12 hours of skating, 
contests, music, art, food and, in the evening hours, movies and camping in the park. 
Aside from honoring an excellent member of the Park, the group raises funds to go 
towards a new ramp in his name. 

■ The Andover Community Skate Park continued to play an influential role for AYS. 
Aside from normal hours of operation, many young people have the opportunity to 
participate in skateboarding lessons and clinics. High School mentors instruct youth on 
the various skateboarding tricks and ramp riding techniques. The ACSP hosted two 



87 



professional skateboard demonstrations over the Summer with 400 spectators at each 
demo. Skateboard competitions provide local youth an opportunity to showcase their 
honed skills and win some prizes at the same time. The Andover Community Skate Park 
remains an extremely positive asset to the community. 

NETWORKING AND ADVOCACY - Year round 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. Andover Youth Services is dedicated to establishing a community-wide network 
of supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following organizations, 
creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for youth. Each of 
the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services and outreach to those young 
people who are not connected positively to the Andover community. 

Andover Youth Council 

AYS operates directly with the Andover Youth Council. The council is comprised of 
twenty-five high school students and three adult members chosen from the community. The 
mission of the Youth Council is to advocate for all youth and to bring more services 
pertaining to issues relevant to their lives. The goal is to empower Andover' s young people 
by getting them involved with community organizations, the schools and Town government 
in order to create opportunities for youth. 

- Andover Youth Foundation, Inc. 

A non-profit corporation organized to undertake the construction of a Youth Center. 

■ Andover Community Advocates for Resources, Education and Support (CARES) 

Andover CARES is dedicated to supporting life affirming choices, fostering resiliency and 
increasing a sense of belonging in the community. 

■ AMC Youth Oppportunities Program (YOP) 

The Appalachian Mountain Club Youth Opportunities Program helps youth workers and 
youth-serving agencies offer educational and recreational outdoor opportunities for their 
youth. The AMC encourages the involvement of all people in its mission and activities and 
their goal is to be a community which is comfortable, inviting, and accessible for people of 
any age, gender, race, religion, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation or socioeconomic status. 

ADMINISTRATION - Year round 

Hiring, supervising and training seasonal, part-time staff and volunteers. 

2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Created quality programs in four areas: recreation, social, support and education. AYS 
served over 7,000 participants over the course of the year. 



88 



Completed the renovation of the Andover Community Skate Park. Originally built in 
1998, the Park was constructed with pressure-treated lumber and in need of a serious 
overhaul. With a grant from Converse and resources raised from several fundraisers, a 
permanent concrete section, complete with landscaping, new fence and stone wall, was 
built and gentrified the entire area. The ACSP is, once again, the premier municipal park 
in the New England area. 

The Green Team, the AYS High School Employment Program, completed several 
municipal projects for the Plant & Facilities Department including: repainting and 
repairing the Wood Memorial Park fence, painting the basement floors in all of the 
Andover Public Schools, painted all of the public benches in Shawsheen Square and The 
Park adjacent to the Town Offices, painted the two press boxes at the High School's 
Lovely Field and cleaned out several Town-owned properties. These unbudgeted 
projects saved the Town upwards of $75,000. 

AYS created an international partnership with the Margaret Okari Children's School in 
Kisii, Kenya and Thoreau Institute through the Walden Youth Summit. An AYS 
delegation traveled to the school for African AIDS orphans and connected them via 
Skype to schools from Costa Rica, Pakistan, Taiwan, New Zealand and Concord, MA. 
They formed an international bond through environmental conservation projects 
including water catchment, reforestation and sustainable animal husbandry. The 
foundation has been set for future service trips to the school. 

Provided a variety of service and outreach to young people and their families. 
Empowering young people to make their ideas a reality, listening to concerns and issues, 
college recommendations, referrals, non-traditional office hours, advocacy, collaboration 
with community groups and a variety of other services provides young people with the 
help or connection they need. 



89 



AYS STATISTICS 



YOUTH SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$360,000 
$320,000 
$280,000 
$240,000 
$200,000 
$160,000 
$120,000 
$80,000 
$40,000 



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90 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The mission of the Veterans Services Office is to do whatever is necessary to provide 
Andover veterans with benefits, entitlements and services whether they be medical, administrative, 
financial or quality of life. 



The Veterans Services Office provides or coordinates all State and Federal financial, medical 
and administrative benefits to Andover' s 3,000 veterans and their families. 

State Benefits - In 2010 the Office responded to increased Public Assistance requests from 
veterans for fuel, food, housing, burials medical needs and other under Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter 115 (M.G.L. CI 15). This increase for Public Assistance is due to the tightening economy 
and aging veteran population. The Public Assistance Program is paid for by the Town and 
reimbursed 75% by the State under M.G.L. CI 15. Veterans' Public Assistance significantly 
increased in 2010. Throughout the year, the Veterans Office managed re-occurring Public 
Assistance Cases for veterans and/or their families culminating in over $80,000 disbursed to veterans 
and their dependents. 

Federal Benefits - Obtaining Federal benefits for local veterans is a priority in the office to 
include service connected disability claim processing. Andover residents receive over $2 million 
dollars in tax-free Federal veterans' benefit dollars annually - mostly through service connected 
disabilities and widows' pensions. 

The Office also planned and coordinated the patriotic ceremonies in observance of Veterans 
Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, the anniversary of September 1 1 th and placed over 6,800 flags on the 
graves of veterans buried in Andover. Band concerts and other civic activities during the year were 
also handled by the Veterans Services Office including the holiday season performance by The Air 
Force Band of Liberty at the Collins Center. 

Highlights in 20 1 include the re-dedication of the Memorial Auditorium in the Doherty 
Middle School - Andover' s WWI Memorial, updating Elm Green Veterans Memorial Park and 
publishing Heroes Among Us - Book 2 - a book spotlighting Andover' s living WWII Veterans who 
served in the European Theater. Additionally, the Office was active in the local coordination of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Afghanistan/Iraq "Welcome Home Bonus Program" which pays 
service members deployed to combat zones a $ 1 ,000 bonus and those called to active duty outside 
combat zones a $500 bonus. A focus for the Veterans' Service Director was to continuously 
improve the Veterans' Office record keeping and update it where possible as well as an on-going 
project comparing Andover Revolutionary War records to the existing Veterans Office Records. 

Sixty-seven Andover veterans died during 2010. This represents a 25% increase over 2009. 
These veterans served from WWII through the Vietnam War. Several of these veterans fought in 
more than one war. The Director of Veterans Services also serves as the Town's Graves Registration 
and Burial Officer. 



91 



KEY VETERANS SERVICES: 

State Veteran Public Assistance Benefits (Massachusetts General Law CI 15 / MGL CI 15) 

Outreach, Intake and Counseling, Public Assistance Disbursements and Semi-Annual Audits 

Federal Veteran Benefits (Veterans Administration/VA) 

Disability Claim Processing, Elderly Aid and Attendance, Health Care, Burial and Widow's Pension 
Processing and Grave Marker Applications 

Graves Registration 

Veteran funerals, Family Burial Counseling, Necrologies and Records Management for over 7,000 
Veterans (living and deceased) 

Committees and Coordination 

Patriotic Holiday Committee, Elder Services, Red Cross Armed Services Committee, and local 
Veterans' Groups (The American Legion and Disabled American Veterans) 



Patriotic Programs and Ceremonies 

Memorial Day, Veterans Day, Patriotic Concerts, September 1 1 th Remembrance, Annual Veterans' 
Luncheon and other 



Memorial Care 

Monument oversight, dedication as needed and Veterans' grave flags (10 cemeteries and over 3,800 
flags) 



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ANDOVER VETERANS DEATHS 



Name 

Abugov, Jacob 
Andrews, Jerome E. Jr. 
Antriasian, Edward L. 
Avery, John 
Aznoian, Harold M. 
Bardetti, Joseph F. 
Beggan, Thomas F. 
Bernard, Joseph H. 
Bolton, Wallace L. 
Brouck, Henry J. 
Burton, Paul F. 
Caldwell, Richard S. 
Carpenter, Calvin E. 
Collins, Roger W. 
Croteau, Andrew A. 
Dalton, Michael T. 
Darby, Thomas M. 
Dea, Robert L. 
Devejian, Robert K. 
Dufresne, Roger R. 
Eastman, Frederick C. 
Eldred, Richard J. 



Branch 


Service Era 


Army Air Corps 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


Korea 


Navy 


Peacetime 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Army 


Korea, Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army Air Corps 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Marines 


GWOT 


USCG 


Korea 


Army 


Korea 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


Korea 



93 



Name 

Ermer, Arthur W. 
Fitzgerald, Francis I. 
Gleason, Louis E. Jr. 
Greenfield, Charles L. 
Guild, Norman B. 
Harris, John C. 
Harvey, Alvin E. 
Hayward, Charles W. 
Hennessey, Leo 
Hill, Kenneth W. 
Hoyt, Harry E. 
Kearn, Charles R. 
Keck, James C. 
Keefe, George R. 
Kulaga, Fred J. 
LaFrance, Elsie M. 
Lamontagne, Joseph W. 
Lucey, John R. 
MacKenzie, Earl 
Marciano, Richard A. 
McConnell, John A. Jr. 
McSurdy, Ruth L. 
Milne, Alexander V. 



Branch 


Service Era 


Army 


WWII, Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII, Korea 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


Air Force 


Korea, Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Coast Guard 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army Air Corps 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Air Force 


Peacetime 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


Korea 


Navy 


WWII 


Coast Guard 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 



94 



Name 

Morin, Donald E. 
Morton, Vincent P. Jr. 
Normandy, Joseph M. 
Perichetti, Robert 
Porter, Donald V. 
Rogers, Samuel S. 
Roman, George S. 
Rosenberg, Oscar 
Sack, Clare C. 
Sampson, John D. 
Sharpe, Ralph N. 
Sosa, Victor A. 
Spatola, Alfred A. 
Tanionos, Charles J. 
Taylor, Bruce 
Thompson, Donald L. 
Towne, Alvin H. 
Tyning, Harold W. 
Wasserboehr, Harvey P. 
White, Jean N. 
Wright, Robert Louis 
Zajicek, Leo A. 
Zemis, John A. 



Branch 




Service Era 


Air Force 




Korea 


Navy 




Korea 


Navy 




WWII, Korea 


Army 




Vietnam 


Army 




Korea 


Navy 




WWII 


Army Air 


Corps 


WWII 


Army 




WWII 


Army Air 


Corps 


WWII 


Marines 




WWII, Korea 


Army 




Korea 


Army 




Korea 


Navy 




WWII 


Navy 




WWII 


Navy 




Korea 


Navy 




Korea 


Navy 




WWII, Korea 


Navy 




WWII 


Army 




WWII 


Army 




WWII 


Army 




WWII 


Army Air 


Corps 


WWII 


Army 




WWII 



95 



ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

The mission of the Andover Public Schools, in partnership with the community, is to 
provide students with the knowledge, skill, and qualities required to be successful in a diverse 
society. 

I am both pleased and proud to write this, my first, preface to the respective reports of our 
schools. As you read the reports, you will note that the strength of our school district is in the 
quality of our students, our faculty, our support staff, our school leadership, and our community. 

The 2009-2010 school year, Andover Public Schools (APS) had an enrollment totaling 
6,121 students. The enrollment in our six elementary schools had a reduction of 21 students for a 
total enrollment of 2,867 students. The middle school enrollment had an increase of 23 students 
resulting in a 2010 enrollment of 1,509 students. The high school realized the greatest reduction 
in enrollment decreased by 51 students for a total enrollment of the 1,745 students. The 
enrollment at the high school continues to be well above the 1997 enrollment of 1,404 and as a 
result, there is considerable overcrowding at the school. In 2009-2010, the District- wide 
enrollment increased by 1 1 students. 

The school district goal is to provide an engaging and comprehensive curricula that 
challenges all students, raises their achievement level, and enables them to meet or exceed both 
Andover and Massachusetts learning standards. 

School Committee 

In March 2010, incumbent Dick Collins was re-elected for a fifth term and newcomer 
Paula Colby-Clements was elected to her first three-year term to fill the seat of Debra Silberstein, 
Esq. who did not seek re-election. The School Committee voted Dennis Forgue and Annie 
Gilbert to serve as chairperson and secretary respectively. The Committee has met with the 
Andover Education Association since June 20 1 to engage in contract negotiations which are on- 
going at the time of submitting the Annual Report. The Chairs, Town Manager and 
Superintendent met to review budget assumptions and upcoming contract negotiations, and the 
Tri-Board convened to discuss rising health insurance costs and collective bargaining. 

School Administration 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach resigned from her position as the Superintendent of Schools after 
twelve valued years. Dr. Bach leaves a rich legacy of accomplishment and caring for all students 
in the Andover Public Schools. Her tenure as superintendent should be remembered for the 
challenging learning environment and opportunities she brought to APS for students and teachers 
in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), technology integration, and a 
focus on 21st Century skills. We wish Dr. Bach well in her position at the Massachusetts 
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education where she is pursuing educational issues 
that are so important to her. 

The new school year included other changes in the administrative leadership team. Dr. 
Marinel McGrath was appointed Superintendent of Schools effective July 1, 2010. Other 
appointments included Mr. Peter De Roeve as the Interim School Business Administrator and 



96 



upon the September 2010 resignation of Mr. Jonathan Harris, Principal of Andover High School, 
Dr. Thomas D. Sharkey was appointed as the Interim Principal of Andover High School. Ms. 
Robin Wilson was appointed as the Doherty Middle School (DMS) Principal and Mr. Andrew 
Long was appointed DMS Assistant Principal following the resignations of Principal Theresa 
McGinness who left to pursue her doctoral studies at Boston University and Assistant Principal 
Betty Innabelli who was appointed Principal of the Georgetown (MA) Middle School. 

Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment & Staff Development 

Dr. Susan Nicholson, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction 

Under the leadership of Assistant Superintendent of Dr. Susan Nicholson, the Bullying 
Prevention and Intervention Task Force completed its work on a prevention and intervention 
plan in December. The Andover School Committee formally adopted the Plan which was 
approved by the MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 

The elementary standards-based progress report was revised and implemented based on 
the results of survey responses from parents and teachers. Revisions were made to the 
performance indicators and sections of the progress report. Teachers in both the English 
language arts and math curriculum councils are continuing their work this school year to define 
the performance indicators. 

Teachers enrolled in last spring's eTextbook courses are piloting new technology. At 
Doherty Middle School, teachers are using the iPod touch, at Sanborn Elementary School 
teachers are using a smartboard, a slate, and student response systems while Andover High 
School teachers are using Mac computers for the first time in a number of years. 

A new reading program, Fundations, was adopted for students in grades K-3 to 
supplement our current programming in the areas of phonetics and writing. K-3 teachers are 
participating in a staff development program relative to program implementation during the early 
release days. 

Curriculum for our Wellness Program is still being reviewed and revised. Members of the 
Wellness Council will present the revised K-5 Wellness Curriculum to the Andover School 
Committee in June 201 1 with implementation slated for September 201 1. 

This year our Teaching American History grant is wrapping up. Teacher Lauren Ream 
coordinated the program's final offerings this fall and has written the final report. AHS Teacher 
Brian Carey continues to work with Lauren Ream and Lisa Glickstein to prepare a new grant 
application for this very important professional development opportunity for our teachers. 

Business Office 

Mr. Peter DeRoeve, Interim School Business Administrator 

Under the leadership of Interim School Business Administrator, Mr. Peter De Roeve, the 
Business Office manages financial operations and selected support services; develops and 
manages the annual budget, processes payables and payroll, and oversees compliance, 



97 



purchasing, fee collection, financial reporting, Capital Improvement Plan development and 
grants management. In addition to financial oversight, the Business Office is responsible for 
facilities management (in cooperation with the Plant and Facilities Department), student 
transportation, school and district emergency management, custodial services and food services. 

Human Resource Office 

Ms. Candace Hall, Director of Human Resources 

Under the direction of Ms. Candace Hall, Director of Human Resources, the Human 
Resource Office's focus continues to be providing quality, cost-effective support services to 
managers and employees for the entire town/school department workforce. 

In recent years, our focus has been to work with the Town and School Administrators, 
Town and School elected officials and union leaders to provide affordable health insurance to the 
town's employees. Through the collaborative efforts of all parties, Andover has made significant 
modifications to its health insurance plans and continues to lead the way in exploring 
opportunities for premium stabilization. Modifications to date include: implementing higher co- 
insurance payments for physician visits and emergency room use; implementing out-of-pocket 
co-payments for out-patient surgery and hospitalizations, offset through a reimbursement 
arrangements; switching health care administration from BlueCross/Blue Shield to the 
Massachusetts Inter-local Insurance Agency; substituting a PPO plan for more costly indemnity 
plans; and promoting flexible spending accounts to help offset employee out of pocket expenses. 
All of these developments have contributed to mitigating premium increases. This year, health 
insurance renewal rates are up 6.4%, which compared to other communities is quite favorable. 
Still, work is underway to continue to drive this increase down through additional plan 
modifications including tiered services and higher deductible plans. 

Human Resources staff continues to explore ways to replace high cost services with less 
traditional, but equally effective tools. For example, recruitment advertising through 
newspapers, particularly the Boston Globe, is expensive and while it cannot be eliminated 
altogether, there have been substantial efforts made to develop alternative ways to develop 
applicant pools. Our emphasis has shifted substantially to recruiting through professional list 
serves, targeted recruitment fairs such as the Merrimack Valley School Educator's Consortium 
Teacher Recruitment Fair (held this year at Merrimack College) and the Massachusetts 
Partnership for Diversity in Education Recruitment Fair. 

Andover' s Legacy of Leadership exemplifies a cost-effective training program for our 
middle management team. In its second year, this monthly program provides our middle 
managers - and the future town leaders - with an opportunity to learn from experienced 
professionals from the public sector. For the most part, these professionals have willingly 
donated their time to this work and have been invaluable resources in helping our staff develop a 
broader understanding of the issues facing public sector managers. 

There are never two years exactly the same in human resource work; it is always a 
challenge. This year's challenges included recruiting the Superintendent of Schools; responding 
to the State's initiatives requiring the submission of more complex school data and employee 



98 



training in the area of conflict of interest; and continuing the work of performance evaluation 
with the Town's management team. 

Andover High School 

Dr. Thomas D. Sharkey, Principal, Ms. Marilyn Jordan, Assistant Principal, 
Mr. Christopher Phillips, Assistant Principal, and Dr. Luz Valverde, Assistant Principal 

I wish to express my thanks to our quality educators and staff serving the families of 
Andover who daily provide our 1 ,745 students with a diverse and relevant learning experience. 
Of special note this year is the faculty's work in curriculum development and their preparations 
for work on the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) self study year. 

Our students continue to excel in their daily academic endeavors and in national and state 
testing. Our students' performance on the Scholastic Aptitude Test, Advanced Placement, and 
MCAS are above national and state averages and rate as one of the best in the Greater Boston 
area. The National Merit Scholarship Program identified four students as Semi-Finalists and 
twenty-six students as "Commended Student's. 92% of the graduating class continued their 
education at 4-year colleges, with an additional 4% continuing at two-year and post-secondary 
schools. Sixty percent of the senior class applied to colleges under the early decision/early action 
admission deadlines. As of March 1st, 3,187 transcript requests have been mailed to 403 
different colleges. College admission results have been encouraging with 656 acceptances 
already received. Included in the list of colleges with acceptances are American University, 
Bates College, Boston College, Columbia University, Georgetown University, University of 
Massachusetts Amherst, Middlebury College, University of Michigan, New York University, 
Northeastern University, Syracuse University, Tufts University, United States Military 
Academy, University of Vermont and Yale University. We are also very proud of our students 
serving in the military and those starting their careers in the workforce. 

The high school garden project is in its second year and during the summer of 2009 
student-interns, under the direction of parent and teacher volunteers, maintained the garden and 
had a presence at the local farmer's market. The money raised this past summer is being used to 
support the efforts for this year. The garden experience is being incorporated into the curriculum 
for our Environmental Science courses and provides an opportunity to teach students about 
sustainability. 

The science department was fortunate to have a Fulbright Exchange Teacher as part of 
our faculty for the fall semester. Ms. Sreeja Raj an came to us from India and assumed the 
teaching responsibilities of Mr. Steve Sanborn whose selection into the program resulted in the 
exchange. The semester provided a number of opportunities for teachers within the department to 
gain insight into educational practices in other areas of the world. 

Andover High School offers 40 clubs and co-curricular activities. Our art, music, and 
drama students continue to distinguish themselves. Andover students participated in the annual 
Massachusetts Drama Guild One-Act Festival as well as District and All-State Band and Chorus. 



99 



Fifteen hundred (1500) roster spots were filled by student-athletes who took advantage of the 
opportunities for learning through the athletic program during the 2010 year. Andover had an 
outstanding 2010 athletic season. The Boys Outdoor Track team earned the All State 
Championship in 2010. The following teams earned Division I State Championships: Boys 
Indoor Track, Girls Basketball, Boys Outdoor Track, Girls Outdoor Track, Field Hockey and 
Girls Swimming and Diving. The following teams earned Merrimack Valley Conference 
Championships in 2010; Girls Basketball, Girls Skiing, Boys Indoor Track, Girls Indoor Track, 
Boys Tennis, Girls Tennis, Girls Lacrosse, Baseball, Boys Outdoor Track, Girls Outdoor Track, 
Girls Cross Country, Girls Swimming and Diving, Field Hockey, Boys Soccer, Girls Volleyball, 
and Football. Overall, the athletic teams won 15 Merrimack Valley Conference titles and one 
North Shore League title out of the 33 varsity sports that are sponsored by Andover High School. 

Doherty Middle School 

Ms. Robin Wilson, Principal and Mr. Andrew Long, Assistant Principal 

Doherty opened its doors this year welcoming a number of changes. Most notably is the 
new administrative team of Robin Wilson as Principal and Andrew Long as Assistant Principal. 
Together, along with members of the staff, they warmly greeted 563 students on the first day of 
school. Additionally, returning members of the Doherty community were pleasantly surprised 
by the complete make over of the front office which was done to address compliance issues and 
the Andover community celebrated the restoration of the Veteran's Memorial Auditorium to its 
original splendor. 

Doherty' s overarching goal continues to be to enhancing the academic, cultural and 
curricular programs in line with research on best practices. This year's focus has been the 
essential question, how can we develop a growing understanding of teaching and learning to 
create enriched environments that support learning? Teachers in all three grades have conducted 
analysis within each discipline area to identify the shared proficiencies students need to be 
successful in a global economy. From this work teachers have developed interdisciplinary 
projects for students to demonstrate deeper connections and greater understanding of concepts 
and skills. 

Other highlights this year include the work that students at Doherty have done with their 
sister middle schools in lending a hand to the greater community. Together students organized a 
canned food drive for a local food pantry during which over one ton of food was collected. 
Additionally, Doherty students have worked to create a student leadership group that will focus 
on accepting differences. Finally, through the generous support from the Doherty Parent 
Advisory Council DMS has been able to purchase eight In-focus machines and thirty-two 
interactive clickers enabling more teachers to incorporate technology into their curriculum. We 
feel fortunate to belong to a school community that works together to ensure the continued 
success for students. 



100 



West Middle School 

Mr. Stephen Murray, Principal and Ms. Deborah Downes, Assistant Principal 

West Middle School administrations and staff articulated three over-arching goals for the 
school year. The primary goal is to continue to focus on Teaching for Understanding using 
Harvard's Project Zero's instructional model. Last year, each teacher and/or team created 
another interdisciplinary project that helped students develop a deeper and long lasting 
understanding of a concept. Students demonstrated their understanding through creative project 
based learning. During the 2010-201 1 school year, each team and/or teacher developed another 
similar unit for a different topic. In addition, each team and/or individual teacher used common 
planning time and faculty meetings to develop units, initiatives and/or strategies to connect with 
students, parents and members of our community. 

Over 150 student leadership positions were created this year. Students mentored peers, 
became involved in defining/changing policies, initiated community service work and students 
led fundraising efforts to help the community and world around us. Working collaboratively 
with our PAC and parent community, our second goal of bringing 2 1 st century skills to teachers 
and students was successful. 

The PAC led a technology fundraiser that raised almost $18,000 which was used to 
purchase interactive whiteboards, document cameras, and projection machines and to provide 
funding to support professional development for teachers so they can use the technology to its 
full extent. WMS now has 1 1 interactive whiteboards in the school thanks to the efforts of our 
parents. 

Last but not least, our third goal is community outreach. Our student council worked 
with the other middle schools on a food drive competition to support Neighbors in Need food 
pantry. Two teams invited senior citizens to mentor and share their experiences and life skills 
with our students. Students created Breast Cancer Awareness Fair and with on-going activities 
that raised $1,500 for Dana Farber. An ambitious group of students made Anti-Bullying their 
mission and are creating public service announcements that they hope to share with our WMS 
community. Making sure our planet is safe for future generations has been the charge of our 
"Going Green" Team led by two dedicated parents. Their creative plans and "Going Green" 
activities keep the importance of personal responsibility, related to keeping a clean earth, on the 
minds of all students, teachers and parents. None of this would be possible without the support 
of our parent community and we thank them for their support. 

Wood Hill Middle School 

Mr. Patrick Bucco, Principal & Mr. William Fleischman, Assistant Principal 

Wood Hill Middle School continues to prepare our students for the 21st Century. "We 
are the World" is our theme this year, which is a perfect match to our students becoming global 
citizens. Wood Hill recently received a Confucius Grant, which allows us to introduce the 
Chinese language and culture through 6th grade expeditionary work and after school classes. 
Our on-going work with Expeditionary Learning (EL) involves our community in highly 
researched practices and nationally recognized professional development. One component of EL 



101 



is expeditions, which are multidiscipline projects that examine at real world issues. Our new 
greenhouse, which was a grant through Nickelodeon and our PAC, allows students to connect 
their learning to the real world as they grow vegetables and herbs which will be used by our 
cafeteria. 

Creating connections and relationships with our adolescent learners is at the core of our 
middle school model. The team teaching approach allows for these connections and our second 
year of "Crew Time" provides a small group setting for students to communicate about topics of 
adolescent concern with a thoughtful, caring adult. The new project adventure ropes course has 
created a great vehicle to have students challenge themselves, work on teamwork, and create 
those connections. We look forward to seeking opportunities to implement innovative practices 
and working with fellow Andover schools and the community to provide opportunities to give 
our students the skills to be the leaders, creators, and problem solvers in the coming century. 

Bancroft Elementary School 

Ms. Francine Goldstein, Principal 

Bancroft School opened the 2010-2011 school year with 483 students, and we are 
growing! We welcomed 15 new students since September, spanning all grade levels. 

On January 25, Andover residents voted to provide funding to build a new Bancroft 
School. The Bancroft children, excited in the knowledge that the town recognized our need and 
supported us, made lovely cards to thank the community. Almost 500 cards hung in the School 
Administration offices, the Senior Center, and Memorial Hall Library. To Andover residents, 
our school community says "Thank you, Andover." The Bancroft children, parents, staff and 
neighbors, are an integral part of this project, offering advice and insights as we move forward. 

While the new building project is one focus at Bancroft, our main focus is our children. 
We continue to investigate new ways to most effectively teach our children to be strong learners, 
respectful citizens, and confident, happy individuals. With the support of a dedicated PTO, we 
purchased Promethean boards (eight in all) so that our students benefit from technology to 
enhance their learning. The PTO also supported the purchase of books and materials as well as 
bringing in cultural arts programs to support teaching and learning. 

The Bancroft Community endeavors to create and maintain a climate of respect and 
kindness. Students representing each class in grades three through five are members of the 
C.A.R.E. (Care And Respect Everyone) Council. They meet regularly to discuss and develop 
ways to make Bancroft an inviting and more respectful community. Monthly student-led 
assemblies also focus on kindness and caring. At Bancroft, we believe that learning best occurs 
in a climate of mutual respect and kindness. 

High Plain Elementary School 

Ms Pamela Lathrop, Principal 

The High Plain Elementary School opened on Thursday, September 1, 2010 with 530 
students enrolled in grades kindergarten through five. The students, parents, and staff worked 



102 



diligently to create a supportive and caring school community. We began the year welcoming 
new and returning students. We gathered together to celebrate success and learn about each 
other. 

The PTO Enrichment Council brought many wonderful programs to the schools where 
the children learned about animals, music, electricity, art and dance. During the school year we 
recycled, provided meals for many families, collected winter coats for those in need and engaged 
in several other service learning projects. High Plain School continued to reach beyond the 
school walls to affect others positively. Many students participated in our many clubs and 
activities sponsored by our Learning Leaps program. We tried hard to do our best in school and 
to be kind to one another. High Plain Elementary School embraced the theme of Learning is Not 
a Spectator Sport, Get in the Game! Our goal was for all students to take an active role in their 
learning this year and to be willing to get involved in school and community events. We continue 
to work on a healthy school environment where students, families, and staff work hard to learn 
their best, perform their best, and live their best 

We grew as readers, writers and thinkers. The students performed well in their daily work 
and on mandated tests. Test data were examined to determine areas of weakness and teachers 
met regularly by grade-level teams to review curriculum, share information and materials, and 
discuss appropriate instructional practices to meet the needs of all students. 

The High Plain staff is to be commended, who despite challenging times, continued to 
work hard for all students. The PTO funded programs, supported classrooms, provided fun 
family activities and coordinated a school newsletter. As always we appreciate the continued 
support of our PTO and the entire Andover Community. 

Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 

Ms. Patricia Barrett, Principal 

In 2010, the Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School was one of 304 schools in the nation 
to receive the United States Department of Education Blue Ribbon School of Excellence Award. 
This award is considered the highest honor that an American school can achieve. Following the 
Blue Ribbon Ceremony in Washington, D.C., community and school-based events were held to 
celebrate this achievement. 

Our theme this year is Sanborn STARS - Showcasing Talents and Really Shining. In 
addition to reinforcing Sanborn's values embodied by the four R's: Respect, Responsibility, 
Resourcefulness, and Reflection, we have continued to provide venues to showcase student talent 
while we continue to expand connections within our school and community at large. Sanborn 
traditions include activities around monthly character-based themes such as respect, honesty, and 
acceptance. 

A monthly community-building School Meeting is led by students and includes skits on 
the monthly theme and culminates with the singing of our school song. Wednesday Families, an 
opportunity for children to meet monthly in a K-5 group to work on social competency skills, 
helps to promote a positive school culture. Our Exploration program continues to thrive and 



103 



includes courses such as Math Olympiad, Volleyball, Gymnastics, Book Making, Lego League, 
and Science Smarts. 

An inclusive Student Council provides opportunities for fourth and fifth graders to 
develop leadership skills through their participation on one of ten student-directed committees 
and community service activities. Our annual Harvest Festival is unique to Sanborn and gathers 
the entire school community together to bring gifts and joy to Andover's senior population. 
Delivery of gift bags to Andover's senior citizens is followed by a musical assembly to which the 
seniors are invited. We continue to strive to enhance technology integration across the 
curriculum in our 21st century classrooms. 

We deeply appreciate the continued support of our P.T.O. and the entire Andover Community as 
we strive to provide the very best for our children. 

Shawsheen Primary School 

Ms. Moira O 'Brien, Principal 

As we do each year, Shawsheen had a school-wide theme. This past year we culminated 
our study of Oceans with a K-2 trip to the New England Aquarium. Fall 2010 launched us on 
research and learning about Space: new discoveries; and good-bye to Planet Pluto. Each week 
the children may choose to answer a trivia question about our theme. This has become a family 
event and many students, including preschool, look forward to researching the question each 
week. Staff offered after-school activities to raise money for 2 more Interactive Whiteboards 
bringing our total to 4. With generous donations from community and PTO, we were able to 
have them installed by the beginning of school. The PTO Community Services committee 
worked with the students to raise awareness for those less fortunate and we had record numbers 
for our drives: food (2), clothes, Halloween costumes, books and sneakers. Children made 
Valentines for seniors and our troops overseas. We worked with a high school student on Project 
Kindness. We continued to build our expansive book room inventory to meet the needs of every 
child. We welcomed a partnership with Merrimack College Undergraduate and Graduate Schools 
of Education. 

South Elementary School 

Dr. Colleen McBride, Principal 

This year's school theme, "Have You Filled A Bucket Today?" is based on a wonderful 
piece of literature written by Carol McCloud. The premise of the book is that each of us carries 
an invisible bucket around that holds our feelings. We feel terrific when our bucket is full and 
sad when it is empty. A "bucket filler" lifts others spirits by saying and doing nice things for 
other people. The idea of this theme is to foster our school's core values of respect, 
responsibility, and kindness. Promoting this type of school climate can only increase the 
likelihood that our students better understand that each person can make a positive difference for 
themselves and others. Under the direction of Andover High School teacher, Carol Martini, AHS 
Warrior Way seniors proudly joined our "bucket filling" campaign. Pairs of seniors adopted 
classrooms throughout our school and discussed with them the importance of treating each other 
with kindness and respect. These thoughtful high school students made a tremendous impression 
on our youngsters and we look forward to this continued relationship. 



104 



With great appreciation we recognize the outstanding work of many parents, students and 
community volunteers for the amazing renovation of our school's courtyard during the summer 
and fall seasons. With this magnificent transformation comes the opportunity for our school to 
partner with the National Wildlife Federation to give students the experience of learning hands- 
on, authentic science lessons in their new courtyard habitat! 

Through the continued fundraising efforts of our Parent-Teachers Organization and South 
School Faculty, five additional interactive whiteboards were installed in each fourth grade 
classroom this past summer. One of our fundraisers brought to South School our first ever 
Family Math Night! Our goal to expand the use of interactive whiteboards at the third grade level 
became a reality when local bio-pharmaceutical company, Pfizer Inc., selected South School as 
the beneficiary of a $5,000.00 community outreach donation. Similarly, we take this opportunity 
to thank the Andonna Society for their generous grant award to further integrate technology to 
enhance the learning experience of all students. 

As always we thank our parents, volunteers and community organizations who continue 
to make incredible contributions to our community of learners. 

West Elementary School 

Ms. Elizabeth L. Roos, Principal & Ms. Margo Spinilli, Assistant Principal 

West Elementary School's theme this year is Where Everyone Succeeds Together. West, 
although it has close to 700 students, prides itself in being a big school with a small school feel. 
West Elementary kicked off the Fall by incorporating all the STOP anti-bullying lessons into the 
monthly assemblies and Open Circle lessons. Twenty-first century learning skills continued to be 
a primary focus for West Elementary. West added a third ABA classroom for preschool through 
Grade Four students which enables them to remain in their neighborhood school rather than 
having to attend a school outside of Andover. The faculty and parent community worked hard to 
garner funding to purchase five additional interactive whiteboards for the school. The school 
now has nineteen interactive boards in the classrooms with a goal of attaining one for each room 
by fall of 2013. West Elementary faculty members, Bill Harkins and Frank McCall, taught a 
class on using interactive whiteboards to support the curriculum for sixty K-12 Andover 
teachers. 

West expanded its enrichment offerings to include: math leagues from grade 2- 5, Flag 
Football, Chess, School Newspaper, Gymnastics, Non-Fiction Book Club, Recycling club, Floor 
Hockey, Grade 3 chorus, Math Olympiad, Continental Math League, Friday Fun Fest, Web 2.0, 
and Student Council. Additionally, all fifth graders hold one or more jobs during their final year 
of elementary school. Some of those jobs are: office worker, tour guide, courtyard maintenance, 
school store, and special friends (to our special needs classrooms). 

The Student Council continues to make connections with the community. The monthly 
Walk to School Day supported a different charity each month and West raised several thousand 
dollars for the Beverly School in Kenya, the Andover Youth Center, Books for Lawrence 
Community Daycare, Blankets for the MSPCA, and food for the People's Pantry in North 



105 



Andover and most notably raised $1,000 for the future Andover Youth Center. The student 
council continues to be affiliated with the junior branch of the Rotarians called Early Act. 

West continues to cherish its volunteers from parents, to senior citizens, Rotary Readers, 
West Middle School Tutors and Cross Grade level mentoring. West recently celebrated its 16th 
annual WERAWC (West Elementary Readers' and Writers' Conference) with ten visiting 
storytellers, authors, and illustrators. 

Pupil Personnel 

Dr. Katherine Fink, Director of Pupil Personnel 

The Pupil Personnel Department, under the direction of Dr. Katharine Fink, continues to 
oversee special education services to approximately 1,000 identified students between the ages 
of 3 and 22. The program addresses the needs of students with mild to moderate disabilities, as 
well as those with more intensive special needs and multiple handicaps. To the extent possible, 
special education students attend their neighborhood schools and participate with their typically 
developing peers in the general education setting. The Department continues its commitment to 
work with families to retain students in the district (rather than sending them to out-of-district 
programs), and provides consultation, training, and support to in-district staff in order to meet the 
complex needs of some of our students. 

The ARRA IDEA stimulus monies have been helpful in providing financial support for 
staffing and supplies for the district's most intensive special education programs. The middle 
school specialized programs (the language-based LEAP program at Doherty; the EXCEL 
functional academic program at West Middle; and, the Support II Applied Behavior Analysis 
(ABA) program for students with autism at Wood Hill) are now well established programs that 
are successfully meeting the needs of the students enrolled. In addition, a new "social thinking" 
program at Wood Hill provides support in meeting the needs of middle school students who 
struggle to understand interpersonal relationships and the nuances so prevalent in social 
interactions. At the elementary level, and because of an increasing population of young students 
with autism, a third ABA class has been opened at West Elementary School. At Andover High 
School, a vocational coordinator has been added to focus on transition activities, including pre- 
vocational and vocational training at community job sites, and to establish communication with 
adult agencies to ensure a smooth transition to adulthood. 

In addition to supporting our special needs students, the Pupil Personnel Department also 
continues to oversee programs for educating English Language Learners (ELLs). The number of 
ELLs enrolled in Andover schools continues to grow, and by forming a consortium with Tri- 
Town Public Schools, the district was eligible for the first time in 2010 for Title 3 funds to 
support its ELL program. The needs of these students are being met by a competent and growing 
ELL Department, as well as through the provision of professional development for the district's 
general education teachers. Department policies, procedures, and protocols continue to be 
refined and disseminated. 



106 



Health Education 

Mr. Brian McNally, Program Advisor 

The Andover Health Education Department provides health education to students in 
middle school and high school. The curriculum is designed to increase each student's mental, 
physical, emotional and social well being. Health Education teachers align the curriculum with 
the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks instituting the sequential and 
coordinated teaching of health. Health teachers administered the Center for Disease Control 
Youth Risk Behavior Survey to students in grades 7, 9 and 11 in 2010. Behaviors related to 
tobacco, alcohol and illegal drug use, diet, exercise, violence and mental issues were reported. 
Community network teams such as Andover' s Community Health Advisory Team met to build 
safe schools. Student groups such as Peer Leadership and Student's Against Destructive 
Decisions taught students to take an active role as models for positive health decisions. This 
included SADD's prom program encouraging high school students attending the prom to be 
alcohol and drug free and to make safe decisions that evening. The Health Education Department 
sponsored an evening presentation for parents and the community on social host liability that 
featured district attorney Blodgett. A variety of speakers were brought in to school to speak with 
students about important curriculum topics. The Parent to Parent speaker series had an 
established program of speakers that directly tied to curriculum initiatives. 

Technology 

Mr. Raymond Tode, Director of Information Systems and Technology 

The Andover Public Schools' Technology Department continues to strive to meet our 
goal of enhancing student learning with the application of technology to assist our students with 
accessing, collecting, authenticating, managing, assessing, and analyzing information effectively 
and ethically. Currently, we support 7,229 users that access 2,246 networked desktop and laptop 
computers, the Plant & Facilities Department video security and entry system, the HVAC 
monitoring systems, and the enterprise size infrastructure that is necessary to support our clients. 

This year has presented many interesting opportunities and challenges for technology in 
the Andover Public Schools. We look forward to welcoming our new Chief Information Officer 
(CIO) and the consolidation of the four IT Departments - School, Town, Public Safety, and 
Library. The consolidation promises to maximize personnel resources; coordinate equipment 
purchasing, management and deployment; and coordinate the flow of information between the 
four computer networks and municipality processes. Cost savings over the long haul are 
forecasted and efficiencies are anticipated. 

Our challenge is to maintain and manage an aging inventory of computer equipment. Of 
our 2,368 computers we have deployed in our schools, 88% of desktop computers, 73% of laptop 
computers, and 83% of our 757 printers are 5 years old or older. As part of the Strategic 
Planning Process which began last year, a Technology Pinpoint sub-committee was convened 
with the charge to identify the present status of the school district technology and develop an 
approach for the future. The Technology Pinpoint Committee presented its findings to the 
Strategic Planning Committee in August 2010 and the School Committee in October. The 
Pinpoint Committee recommended (A) reducing operational cost by maximizing the use of 



107 



"cloud computing" and free applications available on the Internet; (B) leveraging the use of 
student owned devices in the classroom; (C) ensure that technology is properly integrated into 
the educational environment; (D) provide students with instruction on the ethical and appropriate 
use of technology in society; and (E) provide appropriate, targeted training and support to the 
teachers. In addition, the school district should ensure equitable access to the Internet for 
everyone, everywhere. Since online access is vital in today's world, we need to provide 
adequate bandwidth to the Internet. The ultimate goal being to enhance learning through a 
differentiated learning experience with a global perspective, teach our students how to problem 
solve, communicate effectively, collaborate, and be creative. 

Closing 

No report of this kind would be complete without taking the opportunity to thank the 
many people who have been so thoroughly supportive of our schools this past year. On behalf of 
the students, faculty, administration, and School Committee, I thank the PACs and PTOs, the 
Andover Coalition for Education (ACE), the Andover Fund for Education (AFE), the Andover 
Rotary Club, the Andover Service Club, the athletic and extracurricular booster clubs, the 
Andonna Society, and the many generous parents and residents who have given of their time and 
money to support our schools. 

I am also grateful to our faculty, staff, principals, assistant principals, and the District 
Leadership team for their devotion to the children and youth of Andover. Finally, we are most 
appreciative to the townspeople of Andover, the Andover Board of Selectmen and Finance 
Committee who have seen us through difficult times and who continue to support our efforts to 
make the Andover Public Schools the very best they can be. Thank you! 

In closing, our initiatives continue to advance the coherence and quality of our 
educational program. There are many goals yet to realize. Our professional staff must have the 
resources if we are to continue to be competitive with similar school districts in maintaining, 
developing, and sustaining a high quality educational program for all of our students in the 
Andover Public Schools. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Superintendent of Schools 



108 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



Greater Lawrence Technical School is a regional vocational secondary institution with a 
campus in West Andover encompassing twenty-six acres. The school educates students from 
Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North Andover and, in addition, accepts qualified students 
from other communities through the school choice program. There are currently thirty-two 
underclassmen from Andover attending the school and fourteen employees of Greater Lawrence 
Tech reside in Andover. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School is accredited by the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges. In 2010, sixty-two percent of the senior class went on to continue their 
education in either a four or two year college following graduation while the remaining students 
combined either college with full-time employment or made a direct impact on the workforce of 
the Merrimack Valley. College-bound graduates increased twenty-one percent versus the 
graduating class of 2007 (41%). 

GLTS continues to adapt the career areas to meet the ever-changing needs of the twenty- 
first century job market. The eighteen career opportunities offered to students through a four- 
academy model include Allied Health, Automotive Collision Repair, Automotive Technology, 
Barbering, Biotechnology, Carpentry, Culinary Arts, Cosmetology, Dental Assisting, Electricity, 
Electronics & Pre-Engineering, Graphic Communication, HVAC, Information Support Services 
& Networking, Marketing, Metal Fabrication & Joining Technologies, Office Technologies and 
Plumbing. GLTS has been one of the pioneers in the state regarding the successful academy 
model. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School prepares students for lifetime employment through 
nationally and state recognized licensure and certification programs including: Building 
Supervisors License, State Cosmetology, NATEF, ASE, Refrigerant Recovery and Recycling 
License, CareerSafe, SP2, Mass I/M Certification and License, American Culinary Federation 
License, ServSafe, State Board of Electricians, OSHA Safety Certification, Print Ed 
Certification, Art Collaborative, Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation, CPR, First 
Aid, CNA, EKG Technician License, Home Health Aide, NCCAP, Paid Feeders Program, A+, 
Cat. 5, Cisco, Hilti Certification, State Board of Plumbing, Water Pex & Trac Piping 
Certification, and Gastite Certification. The Cooperative Education component of Greater 
Lawrence Technical School allows students to use their knowledge and skills at worksites in the 
Merrimack Valley which include many employers in Andover. 

While the school continues to be a community of learners dedicated to service and 
excellence, Greater Lawrence Technical School maintains its mantra "Demand More, Expect 
More, Achieve More". This has been reflected in the improvement in MCAS scores, the 
phenomenal success of the athletic teams and the continued medal winning prowess of both 
DECA and SKILLS/USA on both the State and National level. 

Residents of Andover have benefitted from many of the consumer friendly services 
offered to the public through our technical programs. At Greater Lawrence Technical School, 



109 



residents have had their cars repaired, received a haircut or manicure, enjoyed lunch in one of the 
school's two restaurants, had brochures printed, and countless other services which have made 
life easier for townspeople each day. In addition, the residents of Andover continue to use the 
school facility by way of enrollment in classes offered through Community and Youth Services 
and athletic venues for both youth and varsity sports teams, which include the swimming pool, 
gymnasiums and fields. Greater Lawrence Technical School continues to be the site for most 
Andover teens receiving their Lifeguarding and Water Safety certifications. More than sixty 
Andover groups and individuals have utilized the rental option created by The District 
Committee. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School continues to offer Night School to the Greater 
Lawrence community, which began in September, 2009. Classes offered include Computer 
Applications, GED, Spanish, English, Trade and Technical, Fitness, CPR, ServSafe, Cooking 
and Crafts. The school currently offers 55 classes and is planning to add a Culinary Training 
Program and Cosmetology Program in 2011. This program is currently funded with ARRA 
Stimulus Funds with the intent to become self-sustaining within two years. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School enjoys a close working relationship with the 
Andover Police Department. Since the 2007 - 2008 School Year, an Andover patrolman has 
been employed by the District as a School Resource Officer. The officer's presence during the 
school day and at after-school and sporting events has had a positive impact on the entire school 
community. 

The Greater Lawrence Technical School District Committee is made up of seven 
members from the four sending communities of Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North 
Andover. In addition to representation on the District Committee, Andover is also represented 
by a resident on both the school's Advisory Board and The School Council. District Committee 
representation is determined by the number of students attending from that community. A listing 
of the Committee members and the city /town they represent can be found in this document's 
Directory of Committees & Boards. 



110 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 



The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June 1948. Monthly meetings are held 
on the third Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court Community Room, 1 00 Morton Street, 
except during the months of January, May and October when meetings are held at the Frye 
Circle Community Room at 256 North Main Street. Board Members and the Executive Director 
are as follows: 

James Cuticchia - Chairman Calvin Deyermond - Vice Chairman 

Francis O'Connor - Treasurer Daniel T. Grams - Assistant Treasurer 

Janice Burkholder - Member Christine Poschen-Metzemaekers - Ex. Director 

The Andover Housing Authority has 33 buildings of State-aided housing for 
senior/disabled people comprised of 2 1 8 units on six different sites - Chestnut Court, Grandview 
Terrace, Frye Circle and Stowe Court. There are 56 units of family housing located on Memorial 
Circle. In addition, the AHA owns one house under the Mass. Chapter 689 Program for 
developmentally disabled adults and administers three Alternative Housing Vouchers under the 
Massachusetts (AHVP) Leased Housing Program for a total of 285 State units. 

State-funded Programs - Income Limits are as follows: 

1 person -$45,100 3 people -$58,000 5 people - $69,600 7 people - $79,000 

2 people -$51,550 4 people - $64,400 6 people - $74,750 8 people - $85,050 

Apartment Turnover 

Senior/Disabled Program - 19 Units or (9%) Average Rent: $308 (including utilities) 

Family Program - 5 units or (9%) Average Rent: $425 (including utilities) 

(including transfers to larger or smaller units and reasonable accommodations) 

State-funded Grants - Capital Improvements 

■ Memorial Circle - HC Renovation completed - $367,687 

Chestnut Court - Electric Transformer Room repairs - $ 1 2,7 1 
Grandview Terrace - Exterior work/painting - $ 1 3 ,000 

State-funded Grant - New Horizons for Youth Program 

An after school homework program for Memorial Circle children funded through the Andover 
Police Department under the Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement 
Assistance Program. 

Federally-funded Programs 

The AHA administers 127 Vouchers under the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program 

through HUD. Application is pending for 50 more vouchers. Section 8 Income Limits are as 

follows: 

1 person - $29,900 3 people -$38,400 5 people -$46,100 7 people - $52,900 

2 people -$34,150 4 people - $42,650 6 people - $49,500 8 people - $56,300 



111 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 

The mission of the Andover Commission on Disability is to address Andover's needs for 
the Town, its residents, visitors, friends, employers and families relative to disability. The 
Commission is an advisory board appointed by the Board of Selectmen to advocate on disability- 
related issues. The majority of the Commission members must be disabled or directly related to 
disability. Included in the Commission 's goals are enhancing the participation of people with 
disabilities in Town activities, research into the needs and problems of residents with 
disabilities, the provision of information, referral and technical assistance to individuals and 
organizations in matters pertaining to disability, the monitoring of local, regional, state and 
federal programs for disabled residents and the support of training related to disability to people 
who reside or work in the Town of Andover. 



The Commission believes in a collaborative effort as the best means to achieve goals and 
has again demonstrated this in 2010. For several years, the Commission actively participated 
with the Community Development & Planning Department in the planning of the Main Street 
Project with the focus on equal access for people with disabilities. 

With a history of participation in the construction of the High School, Wood Hill Middle 
School and High Plain Elementary School, the Commission is committed to being pro-active in 
recommending disability-friendly new construction information to the Community Development 
& Planning Department, School Department, Plant & Facilities Department and architectural and 
construction companies to assure that new construction is in compliance with the mandated 
guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The Commission traditionally 
participates in the review of blueprints as well as the punch lists of completed work. This 
overview of planning on community property extends to the Town's playgrounds. The 
Ballardvale and other playgrounds have had preliminary access reviews but are currently "on 
hold" due to the Town's financial constraints. Further, the Commission enjoys a working 
relationship with the Department of Public Works to whom it submits annual recommendations 
for curb cut priorities in Town sidewalks to facilitate equal access of disabled residents. 

The Commission works closely with the Police Department on Project LifeSaver, the 
search and rescue effort using wristband transmitters to locate family members with conditions 
in which wandering is a tendency. A national program with a 1 00% rescue rate, Andover was 
the first town in Massachusetts with special training for its police officers and sponsorship of 
equipment from the Commission. In addition, the Police Department authorized two members of 
the Commission to function as supplementary overseers of handicap parking spaces in Town. 
The trained and delegated individuals photograph the parking violation, submit all required 
information on the vehicle and turn them in to law enforcement for processing of the citations. 
Massachusetts and local law changed the $100 fine to $250. ACOD paid for 9 xl2" signs that 
post this notice of the higher fine on the same pole as the Handicapped Parking designation. 
While not mandated by law, it is seen as an educational outreach and a visual deterrent. 

With the approval of the Community Development & Planning Department, the 
Commission has also made a concerted effort to introduce the concept of "visitability" which 



112 



means integrating key "access friendly" building modes into newly constructed homes. 
Advantages include access for the disabled who live in the home, access for disabled visitors to 
the home and better resale opportunities for the owners. Access issues include zero-step 
entrances, where at least one entry to the home is graded to street level and a first floor bathroom 
requirement with a door wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs. The concept is forward 
looking in that it considers the needs of multi-generational families who may be able to live 
together as well as the aging population who may wish to remain in their own homes. A flier for 
this educational effort is available in the Community Development & Planning Department and 
the Memorial Hall Library. 

In affiliation with the Best Buddies Program and the Doherty Middle School, three 
puppets which are part of the Autism Awareness Program were purchased by ACOD. These 
puppets are part of disability awareness theatrical programs presented as part of the school 
curriculum and will be part of training in the 2010/2011 school year. The Commission extends 
ongoing support to the School Department in the planning and volunteering aspects of this 
program. 

Financial sponsorship was allotted to the Plant & Facilities Department to complete a 
Braille signage project at the West Elementary School. A requirement of the Americans with 
Disabilities Act, these Braille directional plaques at each doorway allow visually impaired 
students to move about independently in their school. 

The Commission also sponsored supplies to the Senior Center's Community Garden for 
the second year. 

Members of the Commission participate in a review of warrant articles prior to Town 
Meeting each year as well as involvement on committees working on transitional and the Town's 
Master Plan. The Commission's focus is always on the inclusion and accommodation of the 
disabled residents of the town. 



113 



PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the Town 
concerning the preservation of its historic and archeological resources and has been active in 
the following areas: 



DEMOLITION DELAY BYLAW 

The Preservation Commission heard demolition requests for three properties and imposed delays 
of to 12 months. Two structures were deemed historically significant. One building will be 
moved. One building awaits demolition. One building was deemed not historically significant 
and was razed. 

REVIEW OF PLANS 

Twenty-one applications were submitted to be reviewed for historic design compatibility. Five 

of those applications required no formal review. 

DIMENSIONAL SPECIAL PERMIT/HISTORIC PRESERVATION : Three requests were 
submitted for review. Two projects have been approved for referral to the Zoning Board of 
Appeals for review. One project received unanimous ZBA approval and is in process. 

LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICTS: Leo Greene, Preservation Commission representative 

The Andover Preservation Commission and the Ballardvale Historic District Commission work 

cooperatively on issues of mutual interest. 

DESIGN REVIEW BOARD: Craig Gibson, Preservation Commission representative 
The Commission remains vitally interested in the historic buildings and character of the 
downtown and Main Street corridor to Rte. 495. Mr. Gibson is also the Commission's 
representative to the Town Yard Task Force. 

WEST PARISH GARDEN CEMETERY COMMITTEE : Jim Batchelder, Preservation 
Commission representative. (See westparishgardencemetery.org for more information). 

HERITAGE EDUCATION/PRESERVATION AWARDS: 



The 20 th Annual Andover Preservation Awards were held on May 18 th at Memorial Hall Library 
in cooperation with the Andover Historical Society and the Ballardvale Historic District 
Commission to recognize outstanding examples of historic preservation in the community. This 
year, the awards highlighted the outstanding preservation projects over the past 20 years. Eleven 
property owners received this special recognition for their efforts. 

PROJECTS OF NOTE: 

■ Bancroft Elementary School, Built in 1969 

The Commission notes that historically significant Bancroft School, will be demolished 
due to significant structural problems. The school won a national design award when built 
in 1969. 



114 



Shawsheen River Dam Removal Project 

Hearings have taken place throughout the year to determine the benefits and risks of 
removing the dams along the Shawsheen River. The Commission opposes the removal of 
the Ballardvale Dam due to its impact on the historic district. 

Historic Building Survey Project — www, mhl. org/historicpreservation/ 
The historic preservation website is a digitized version of the general survey of Andover's 
historic buildings from the late 17th century through the early 20th century. The website, 
hosted by Memorial Hall Library, allows researchers and Town departments internet 
access to this information as well as maps of the Town's historic districts, information on 
house renovation and links to other resources. As a work in progress, it will be modified 
as new information becomes available. Phase 2 of this project will broaden the survey to 
include appropriate 20 l century buildings. 

Preservation Restrictions 

The Commission continues to develop goals and pursue opportunities to better preserve 
our historic resources. Preservation restrictions are an approval requirement of the 
Dimensional Special Permit for Historic Preservation. The Commission encourages 
individual homeowners to consider preservation restrictions or easements for the 
protection of their historic properties. 

Historic Restoration/Rehabilitation Information 

Acting in its advisory capacity, the Commission is developing and offering educational 
materials to the public. These resources help individual building owners understand the 
meaning of historic preservation, instructs them on the selection of appropriate materials 
and directs them to appropriate alternatives when cost is an issue. As always, the 
Commission is willing to advise building owners on their historic preservation projects. 
Commission member Jim Batchelder is researching and designing detailed maps for all 
seven National Register Historic Districts. All new information will be available on the 
website. 



115 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, 
comfort or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During 2010, the Trustees acted on thirteen cases, disbursing $16,193 .43 . Only the income 
of the Fund is available. The principal of $345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current 
income are invested under the direction of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town 
Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2009 $91,554.71 

Receipts - 20 1 16,193.43 

$107,748.14 

Disbursements - 20 1 16,760.84 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31,2010 $ 90,987.30 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, with staggered terms approved by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved six applications during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/09 $51,571.94 

Income - FY-20 1 3,289.42 

Expenditures - FY-20 1 1.700.00 

Balance as of 6/3 0/10 $53,161.36 



116 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDING June 30, 2010 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



Money Market Fund CBPF) 
Securities @ Book 
Bonds @ Book 
Res.for Cost/Mkt. 



1-Jul-2009 PRINCIPAL FUND 


$0.00 

$70,591.76 

$0.00 


Money Market Fund (CBPF) 
Securities @ Book 
Bonds @ Book 
Res.for Cost/Mkt. 


30-Jun-2010 


$0.00 Gain/loss from Sales of Securities 
$173,752.03 Transfers to/from Operating accts 
$0.00 Decrease from Sales of Bonds 
$0.00 Adjustment to lower of Cost/Market 


$0.00 

$219,343.79 

$25,000.00 

$0.00 


$173,752.03 Increase 


$70,591.76 


$244,343.79 


OPERATING ACCOUNTS 





INCOME 



(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNTS) 



Savings Account 

Checking Account 

Money Market Fund (CBRF) 



Capital Gains - MFs 


$0.00 


Gain/(Loss) - Sale of Securities 


$798.88 


Stock Dividends - Foreign 


$1,584.54 


$0.00 Dividends Received 


$4,151.81 


$1 ,290.05 Interest Received-Bonds/Notes 


$1,663.41 


$90,582.86 Interest Received-Broker/MM 


$46.42 


Other income - royalty 


$252.88 


Other income 


$100.00 


Foreign tax withheld 


-$13.50 


$91 ,872.91 Income Total 


$8,584.44 



Savings Account 

Checking Account 

Money Market Fund (CBRF) 



$0.00 

$1,471.11 

$19,335.39 



$20,806.50 



EXPENSES 



Foreign Taxes - paid 


$64.45 


Andover High School Projects 




2009/2010 


$4,594.88 


* 2010/2011 


$2,216.00 


Misc.Operating Expenses 


$70.24 


Investment Counsel Fees 


$1,290.00 


Honorarium 


$600.00 


Other expenses 


$96.82 


Bank service charge 


$51.00 


Brokerage fees/taxes 


$75.00 


Expense Total 


$9,058.39 


Net Ordinary Income 


-$473.95 


* Requested in mid-June (early) 





Other Income/Expense 
Other Expense 
Fee 

Total Other Expense 

Net Other Income 

Net Income 



-$0.70 



-$0.70 

-$0.70 

-$474.65 



$265,624.94 



TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



$265,150.29 



1V7 



1:40 PM 
7/15/2010 



ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 

SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
TWELVE MONTHS ENDED - June 30, 2010 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 7/1/2009 



LESS: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS- Sold/Exchanged 



PROCEEDS COST GAIN/(LOSS) 

STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 

173,752.03 



4/28/2010 Sold 
5/7/2010 Sold 



300.000 shs Scana Corp 

300.000 shs Hugoton Royalty Trust 

Total Sold 



$11,678.15 
$5,800.09 



ADD: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS - Acquired 



8/18/2009 Bought 

9/4/2009 Bought 

10/15/2009 Bought 

10/16/2009 Bought 

1/28/2010 Bought 

4/29/2010 Bought 

4/29/2010 Bought 

5/21/2010 Bought 



BOOK VALUE 6/30/2010 



500.000 shs 
200.000 shs 
200.000 shs 
250.000 shs 
300.000 shs 
300.000 shs 
250.000 shs 
250.000 shs 



Corning Inc 
Barrick Gold Inc 
Best Buy 
Marathon Oil 
General Electric 
Analog Devices 
Encana Corp 
Merck & Co 



Total Acquired 



$8,664.52 
$8,009.59 



$17,478.24 $16,674.11 



Cost 

$8,190.25 

$7,020.21 

$7,904.12 

$8,234.74 

$4,996.24 

$9,436.46 

$8,287.65 

$8,196.20 



$62,265.87 
219,343.79 



$3,013.63 
-$2,209.50 

$804.13 



BONDS/NOTES 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 7/1/2009 

LESS: BONDS/NOTES - Sold/Matured/Redeemed 

2/11/2010 Redeemed 25000 shs FHLB Call Bond 04.050% due 081116 

6/3/2010 Redeemed 25000 shs FFCB Call Bond 01.850% due 022513 



TOTAL Sold/Matured 



ADD: BONDS/NOTES - Acquired 



8/11/2009 Bought 
2/25/2010 Bought 
6/21/2010 Bought 



BOOK VALUE - 6/30/2010 



25000 shs FHLB Call Bond 04.050% due 081116 
25000 shs FFCB Call Bond 01 .850% due 02251 3 
25000 shs FFCB Call Bond 02.940% due 1221 15 

TOTAL Acquired 
Gain/loss 



$0.00 

25,000.00 
25,000.00 



$50,000.00 



$25,000.00 
$25,000.00 
$25,000.00 



$75,000.00 

$0.00 

$25,000.00 



-$5.25 



TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ BOOK VALUE - 6/30/2010 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET VALUE 

TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ ADJ. BOOK VALUE - 6/30/2010 

Broker - Cash/MM Reserve and Principal Funds- 6/30/2010 
TDBN Checking account 6/30/2010 



$244,343.79 

$0.00 

$244,343.79 

$19,335.39 
$1,471.11 



Gain/(Loss) 
$798.88 



TOTAL VALUE OF ASSETS - 6/30/2010 



$265,150.29 



11£ 



1:42 PM 
7/15/2010 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
Capital Account 

FUNDED PROJECTS 2009-2010 SCHOOL YEAR 

(01Jul2009-30Jun2010) 



PROJECT 

1. AHS Marching Band 

2. AHS Robotics Club 

3. Literary men's reading project 

4. Principal's Discretionary Fund ($5000.00 this year) 



Approved 
at trustee's meeting 

9-May-2009 


Expended 

as of 30Jun2010 


Unexpended 
Balance 

asof3lMar20iO 


$1,500.00 


$550.00 


$950.00 (B) 
carried over to 1 0/1 1 


$1,500.00 


$1,125.28 


$374.72 


$1,000.00 


$978.93 


$21.07 


$5,000.00 


$1,940.67 


$3,059.33 (A) 

$3000 carried over to 10/1 1 



Total 



$9,000.00 



$4,594.88 



$4,405.12 



DETAILS OF MISC. OPERATING EXPENSE 

(01Jul09-30Jun10) 





1-Jul-09 




thru 




30-Jun-2010 


Copying/Printing Costs 


$38.41 


Postage 


$0.00 


Office Supplies - Computer cartridges, paper (1/3) 


$31.83 


Other miscellaneous expenses 


$147.82 


Fidelity Insurance 


$0.00 


Treasurer's Honorarium 


$600.00 


Total 


818.06 



NEW INFORMATION 

Projects 2010/2011 as agreed at committee meeting 29Apr2010 

1 Literary Mem who are Athletes 

2 Robotics at AHS-First Tech Challenge 



Principal's Discretionary Fund 



agreed to funding 

$1,000.00 allocation 
$1,000.00 allocation 

$4,000.00 allocation 



3a plus $3000 left over from this year's Prin Discret fund (A) $3,000.00 carry over 

to be used against the 2010 Summer Reading Initative, of which 
$2216.00 has been requested and spent in June 2010 

3b plus $950 left over from this year's Andover Band Fund (B) $950.00 carry over 



»S 



1:46 PM 
7/15/2010 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF: June 30, 2010 



CAPfTAL ACCOUNT 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

Money Market Fund 

STOCKS & BONDS 

2S:::.CC: Shs FFCB Ca =:-: ::;-C r ; due 122115 Bought 6C1/10; cost S2SOOOOO 

250.000 Shs Merck & Co (Bought 5/21/10: cost 819670) 

250.000 Shs Encana Corp (Bought 5721/10: cost 8287.65) 

300.000 Shs Analog Devices (Bought 4/2S/10; cost 9436.46) 

200.000 Shs Best Buy (Bought! 0/1 5/09; cost S7904.12) 

250.000 Shs Marathon Oil (Bought 101672009: cost $8234.74) 
25000.000 Shs FHLB Can Bond 04.050% due 081116) (Bought 8/1 1/09: cost $25005.25) 

500.000 Shs Coming Inc (Bought 8/18/09:Cost $819075) 

200.000 Shs Barrick Gold Inc (Bought 9/4/2009:Cost $702071) 

300.000 Shs Scana Core (Sold 4/28/10: revd $11678.15) 

200.000 Shs Southern Co 
15000.000 Shs Time Warner Inc (purchase cost was adj to agree with UBS stmts 

600.000 Shs Duke Energy Holding Corp 

300.000 Shs MDU Resources Group 

200.000 Shs Anadarko Petroleum Corp 

300.000 Shs Itnl Paper Co. 

200.000 Shs Novartis AG 

200.000 Shs Glaxo Smitnkline PLC 

403.000 Shs Pfizer 

300.000 Shs CVS 

500.000 Shs. Atmos Energy Corp. 

:■:: ::: s-s c-e-e-z e=~-; 

300.000 Shs General Electric 
300.000 Shs. Honeywell IntL Inc 

::: ::: s-s. <--=- . za->. z:~. 
3:: ::: s-s j- =.e-F.c 

300.000 Shs Hugoton Royalty Trust UBI (Sold 5V7/10; revd S5800.09) 



TOTAL STOCKS & BONDS 



TOTAL MONEY MARKET & SECURITIES 



Reserve for Lower of Cost Marital 









Market Vaiue 


Book 


Book 


Market 


Over/(Under) 


Value 


Value 


Value 


Book Value 


as of 


as of 


as of 


as of 


1^)ul-20D9 


30-Jun-2010 


30-Jun-2010 


30-Jun-2010 


$90,5SZ86 


S19.335.39 


$19,335.39 


SO.OO 


SO.OO 


$25,000.00 


525,109.50 


S1 09.50 


$0.00 


$8,19670 


$8,742.50 


$546.30 


s: :d 


$8787.65 


$7,585.00 


-S70765 


$0.00 


$9,436.46 


$8,358.00 


-S1 .078.46 


so.oo 


$7,904.12 


S6.77700 


-$1,13712 


so.oo 


S8.234.74 


$7,77750 


-$46274 


$0.00 


SO.OO 


SO.OO 


$0.00 


s: ::■ 


$8,19075 


S8.075.00 


-$11575 


so.oo 


S7.02071 


S9.082.00 


$2,061.79 


$8,664.52 


SO.OO 


$0.00 


$0.00 


S5.988.64 


$5,988.64 


S6.656.00 


S567.36 


S14.836.55 


$14,47775 


$17,648.85 


$3,176.10 


S10.938.57 


$10,938.57 


$9,600.00 


-$1,338.57 


S9.171.35 


$9,171.35 


$5,409.00 


-S3.76735 


$8.92747 


S8.922.47 


$7718.00 


-S1, 704.47 


$10,173.46 


S10.173.46 


S5.789.00 


-$3,384.46 


S1 1,690.87 


$11,690.87 


S9.664.00 


-$7026.87 


S1 1,09975 


$11,09975 


$5,80700 


-$4,29775 


$1071975 


$10.21975 


$5,704.00 


-$4,51575 


$9,48175 


$9.48175 


$8,796.00 


-$68575 


$10,529.50 


$10,529.50 


S13.520.00 


$7990.50 


$10,024.81 


$10,024.81 


$4,326.00 


-$5,698.81 


SO.OO 


$4,99574 


S4.326.00 


-$67074 


$10,673.98 


S10.673.98 


$11,709.00 


$1,035.02 


$11,696.03 


$11,696.03 


$17126.00 


S429.97 


$11,631.94 


$11,631.94 


$14,43470 


$2,80276 


$8,009.59 


SO.OO 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$173.75203 


$243,979.99 


S226.224.55 


-$17,755.44 



$264,334.89 $263,315.38 $245,559.94 
$0.00 SO.OO $0.00 



$:.:: 



Change in value of outside assets'accruals 
Accrued Interest 

TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



RESERVE FUND 



BANKNORTH CD ACCOUNT 
MONEY MARKET CASH FUND 



TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT - Banknonh 

TOTAL FUNDS 6730/2010 



S61.33 



$264,334.89 


$263,315.38 


$245,621.27 


-$17,755.44 


s: :: 

$0.00 


SO.OO 

s: :: 

SO.OO 
$1,471.11 


SO.OO 

so.oo 
so.oo 

$1,471.11 


$0.00 
SO.OO 


5: :: 


$0.00 


SI. 290X5 


SO.OO 


$265,624.94 


$264,786.49 


$247,092.38 


-$17,755.44 



120 



1:49 PM 
7/1572010 



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TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 

SCHOLARSHIP ACCOUNT 

SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
TWELVE MONTHS ENDED - June 30, 2010 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 7/1/2009 

LESS: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS- Sold/Exchanged 



PROCEEDS COST GAIN/(LOSS) 

STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 

$224,020.81 



TOTAL Sold 
ADD: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS - Acquired 



$0.00 



$0.00 



$0.00 



TOTAL Acquired 



BOOK VALUE - 3/31/2010 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 7/1/2009 

LESS: BONDS/NOTES - Sold/Matured/Redeemed 

None 



ADD: BONDS/NOTES - Acquired 
None 

BOOK VALUE - 6/30/2010 



TOTAL Sold/Matured 



TOTAL Acquired 



TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ BOOK VALUE - 6/30/2010 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET VALUE 

TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ ADJ. BOOK VALUE - 6/30/2010 

Broker - Cash/MM Reserve Funds and Checking Account - 6/30/2010 

Federated Capital Reserve MM Account - TROW - 6/30/2010 

TDBN Cash Checking acct 6/30/2010 



TOTAL VALUE OF ASSETS - 6/30/2010 



0.00 
224,020.81 

BONDS/NOTES 



0.00 



0.00 




0.00 




0.00 




0.00 




0.00 






Total 


$224,020.81 


Gain/(Loss) 




0.00 


$0.00 




$224,020.81 




$46,545.99 




$10,972.36 




$0.00 




$281,539.16 





122. 



1:58 PM 
7/15/2010 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING: June 30, 2010 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 



DONAND DUNN FUND 
H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 
J.W.BARNARD 
ALICE M.BELL 
THOMAS BLACK 
EDNA G.CHAPIN 
FRED W.DOYLE 
WARREN F.DRAPER 
WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 
ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 
MYRON E.GUTTERSON 
ANDOVER GRANGE 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 
MARGARET F. HINCHCLIFFE 
PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 
ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 
HENRY WYATT 
A.F.B. & W.A. TROW 

Retained earnings 
Roundoff error 







Trow 


Apportioned 


Scholarships 






Misc 


Income 


Net Income 


Awarded 


Actual Balance as of 


Beginning 


Additions 


1-Jul-2009 


1-Jul-2009 


June 2010 


30Jun2010 after all 


BALANCE 


to 


thru 


thru 


proposed 4/16/10 


additions and 


1JUI2009' 


Principal 


30-Jun-2010 


30-Jun-2010 




deductions 






tobf iddfld »ti 


nd of y **< 

$480.94 


-$1,000.00 




$19,378.73 


$0.00 


$18,859.67 


$1,371.83 


$0.00 




$34.06 




$1,405.88 


$8,488.43 


$0.00 




$210.66 




$8,699.09 


$1,443.43 


$0.00 




S35 82 




$1,479.25 


$15,325.61 


$0.00 




$380.35 




$15,705.96 


$3,225.21 


$0.00 




$80.04 




$3,305.25 


$10,280.93 


$0.00 




$255.15 




$10,536.08 


$2,112.57 


$0.00 




$52.43 




$2,165.00 


$3,663.77 


$0.00 




$90.93 




$3,754.70 


$1,481.26 


$0.00 




$36.76 




$1,518.02 


$2,015.56 


$0.00 




$50.02 




$2,065.58 


$3,589.73 


$0.00 




$89.09 




$3,678.82 


$19,660.77 


$0.00 




$487.94 




$20,14B,71 


$33,802.27 


$0.00 




$838.90 




$34,641.17 


$12,057.44 


$0.00 




$299.24 


-$1,000.00 


$11,356.68 


$29,854.69 


$0.00 




$740.93 




$30,595.62 


$18,220.54 


$1,290.00 




$452.19 




$19,962.73 


$90,687.52 


$0.00 


$2,998.44 




-$2,000.00 


$91,685.96 


-$24.99 










-$24.99 


$276,636.30 


$1,290.00 


2,998.44 


$4,615.42 


($4,000.00) 


$281,539.16 



* The amounts shown for each scholarship fund are actual as of 01Jul2009. 

All incomes annd scholarship awards starting 01Jul05 have been apportioned in. 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE)01Jul09-30Jun10 

Gross Income - Scholarship Fund 
Interest Income - Broker MM 
Dividend Income - Securities/MF 
Capital Gain Distributions - MF 
Galn/(Loss) on Sale of Securities 
Misc inc check error/return 



$0.38 

$5,382.17 

$0.00 

$0.00 

$96.82 



Expenses - Scholarship Fund 
Maintenance fee - Broker/MM for period 01Jul09-30Jun10 
Brokerage fees 

Net Income - Scholarship Fund 



$0.00 
$863.95 



$4,615.42 



Gross Income - Trow Fund 
Interest Inc Broker MM - Trow 
Div Inc MF - Trow 
Capital Gain Distrib - Trow 
Gain/Loss on Sale of Securities 

Gross Expenses - Trow Fund 
Maintenance fee - Trow for period 01Jul09-30Jun10 
Brokerage fees 

Net Income - Trow Fund 



$0.09 

$3,416.70 

$0.00 

$0.00 

$0.00 
$418.35 



$2,998.44 added directly to Trow fund 



Total Net Income - 01Jul09-30Jun10 



$7,613.86 



Scholarships Awarded June 2010 



Donald Dunn Fund 
Punchard Trustees 
AFB & WA Trow Fund 



1,000.00 lubtracted after apportioned income added 
1,000.00 subtracted after apportioned Income added 
2,000.00 aubtracted after Trow Income added 



June 2009 Golf Tournament 
June 2009 Golf Tournament 



Gross Income - H.P.Wyatt Fund 
Expenses - H. P. Wyatt Fund 

Not Income - H.P.Wyatt Fund 



$1,290.00 
$0.00 



$1,290.00 

added directy to H P Wyatt fund 



123 



2:08 PM 
7/15/2010 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
SCHOLARSHIP and TROW FUNDS 



VALUE of FUNDS 



TD BANKNORTH CHECKING ACCT. 

FEDERATED CAPITAL RES. MONEY MARKET FUND 

1166.74 Shs Templeton Growth Fund (sold 10/9/08) 

5779.990 Shs Franklin US Gov Securities CIA (bought in 2 lots 10/9/08 &1 0/14/08) 

2.578.907 Shs. AMERICAN BALANCED FUND Class A 

885,319 Shs. CAPITAL INCOME BUILDER FUND (sold 452.080 shs 10/14/08 

14,529.012 Shs. FRANKLIN INCOME FUND Class A 

Total - Individual Scholarship Funds 

FED. CAP. RES. MONEY MARKET/ TROW FUND 

561.590 Shs Pioneer Cullen Value Fund (sold 561.590 shs 10/14/08) 

758.494 Shs. PIONEER EQUITY INCOME/TROW FUND Class A 

1325.311 Shs Franklin US Gov Securities CI A (bought 10/14/08) 

828.272 Shs Income Fund of America CI F 

4,100,601 Shs. PIONEER HIGH YIELD/ TROW FUND Class A 

Total - Trow Scholarship Funds 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 

Total value of funds held (30June2010) 



Book Value (BV) Book Value (BV) 
1-Jul-2009 30-Jun-2010 



Market Value (MV) 

30-Jun-2608 3.<j\C 



-$96.82 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$42,599.26 


$46,545.99 


546,545.99 


SO.OO 


$0.00 




S37.221.14 


537,221.14 


$39,475.21 


$47,329.79 


$47,329.79 


$40,127.79 


$22,766.70 


522,766.70 


$19,110.17 


$36,100.00 


$36,100.00 


$28,912.73 


$186,016.89 


$189,963.62 


$174,171.89 


$10,112.05 


$10,972.36 


$10,972.36 


$0.00 


$0.00 




$20,068.18 


$20,068.18 


$15,890.45 


$8,535.00 


$8,535.00 


$9,051.87 


S15,000.00 


$15,000.00 


512,101.05 


$37,000.00 


537,000.00 


536,536.36 


$90,715.23 


$91,575.54 


$84,552.09 


$0.00 


SO.OO 


$0.00 


$276,635.30 


$281,539.16 


$258,723.98 



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TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSCHUSETTS 

COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 6/30/2010 











Proprietary Fund Type 






Fund Type 


Total 






Water 


Sewer 


Capital 


Special 


Internal 


Expendable 


(Memorandum 




General Fund 


Enterprise 


Enterpnse 


Projects 


Revenue 


Service 


Trust 


Only) 


Revenues: 


















Motor Vehicle Excise 


4.472,856 38 














4,472,856.38 


Other Excise 


962,29800 














962,298.00 


Penalties and Interest on Taxes and Excis 


286,865.28 














286,865.28 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


156,425.14 














156,425.14 


Fees 


28,314.00 














28,314.00 


Charges for Services - Water 


0.00 


6,204,217.41 












6.204,217.41 


Charges for Services - Sewer 


0.00 




3,549,761.25 










3.549,761.25 


Departmental Revenue - School 


227,785.00 








5,696,180.72 






5,923.965.72 


Departmental Revenue - Library 


16,890 77 














16,890.77 


Other Departmental Revenue 


1,035,724.68 


153,435.78 






3,480,091.69 






4,669,252.15 


Utility Liens 


0.00 


87.179.39 


64,245.35 










151,42474 


Licenses and Permits 


1,518,199.28 














1,518.199.28 


Special Assessments 


0.00 


1,489.62 


1,842,016.86 










1,843,506 48 


Fines and Forfeits 


498,430.50 














498,430.50 


Investment Income 


185,813.63 


691.65 


14,092.91 




9.289.16 


2.491.40 


22.245.77 


234,624.52 


Misc Non Recurring 


140,408.32 














140,408.32 


Other 


















Intergovernmental 


10,984.162.00 




100,619.80 




6,582,745.64 






17,667,527.44 


Real/Personal Property Taxes 


100,294,961.95 














100,294,961.95 


Tax Titles 


111.980.21 














111,980.21 


Offset 


















DCS 


544,900.44 














544.900.44 


AYS 


13,760.00 














13,760 00 


Elder Services 


134,552.45 














134,552.45 


Rentals 


64,533.65 














64,533.65 


Off Duty Admin Fee 


56,858.24 














56,858.24 


Cemetery Internment Fees 


60,151.00 














60,151.00 


Ambulance Fees 


965,977.77 














965,977.77 


Trust Fund and other 


0.00 










4.490,451.71 


299.040 31 


4,789,49202 




122.761,848 69 


6,447,013.85 


5,570.736 17 


00 


15,768,307.21 


4,492,943.11 


321,286 08 


155,362,135 11 


Expenditures 


















General Government 


5,409,28590 








4,633,957.68 




24,593.16 


10,067,836.74 


Community Service 


1,626.401.68 














1,626,401.68 


Municipal Maintenance 


4,243.390.82 














4,243,39082 


Public Safety 


13.749,768.99 














13,749,768.99 


Water Enterprises 


000 


3,446,621.90 












3.446,621.90 


Sewer Enterprise 


0.00 




2,175,751.49 










2,175,751.49 


Public Works 


5,052,053.33 






8,973,083.32 








14.025.136.65 


Library 


2,494,767.07 














2,494,767 07 


School 


60,442,671.34 








10,452.777.28 






70,895.448.62 


Insurance 


485,700.90 










17,102,069.21 




17,587,770.11 


Health Insurance 


16,488.00 














16,488.00 


Debt Service 


13,112,114.67 














13,112,114.67 


Unemployment Comp 


0.00 










286,408.17 




286,408.17 


Retirement 


4,635,498.00 














4,635,49800 


State and County Assessments 


3,072.718.00 














3,072,718.00 




114,340,858.70 


3,446.621.90 


2,175.751 49 


8.973,08332 


15.086,734.96 


17.388,477 38 


24.593.16 


161,436.120 91 



Other Financing Sources (Uses) 



Short Term Debt Buy Down 

Transfer to Building Insurance Trust Fund 

Art 09, 2010 Fiscal 2010 CIP 

Water Deficit Raised on Recap 

Water Indirect Costs 

Sewer Indirect Costs 

STM Art 8, Oct 2009 

Long Term Debt 

Article 52, 2010 (6216) From f 

Health Insurance Appropriatior 

Unemployment Comp Appropri 

Funding of OPEB 45 

Article 44, 2008 ((6199) From 

Receipts Reserved - Wetland I 

Receipts Reserved - Parking R 

From Perpetual Cares 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues over 
(Under) expenditures and other 
Financing Sources (Uses) 



Fund 








(78,12802) 


78,128.02 




0.00 


(1,246,000.00) 






1,246.000.00 








0,00 


(24,600.99) 


24,600.99 












0.00 


2,992,889 00 


(2.992.889.00) 












0.00 


3,437,014.50 




(3,437,014.50) 










0.00 


0.00 


400,000.00 




(400,000.00) 








0.00 


0.00 






5,566,000.00 








5,566,000.00 


(54,000.00) 






54,000.00 








0.00 


(12.618,000.00) 










12,618.000.00 




0.00 


i (150,000.00) 










150,000.00 




0.00 


(157,500.00) 




(100,620.00) 








258,120.00 


0.00 


0.00 






75,000.00 






(75,000.00) 


0.00 


f 6,000.00 








(6,000.00) 






0.00 


! 276,163.00 








(276,163.00) 






0.00 


10,000.00 












(10.00000) 


000 


(7,528,034.49) 


(2,568,288.01) 


(3,537,634.50) 


6,541,000.00 


(360,291.02) 


12,846,128.02 


173,120.00 


5.566,000 00 



Fund Balance July 1, 2009 
Fund Balance June 30, 2010 



892.955.50 432,103.94 (142,649.82) (2,432,083.32) 321,281.23 (49.406.25) 469.812.92 

4,104,242.54 (24,600.99) 2,943,667.56 6,930,150.58 4,013,156.23 795,547.26 7,356,644.54 



4,997,198.04 



407,502.95 



2.801,017.74 



4.498,067.26 4,334,437.46 



746,141.01 7,826,457.46 



(507,985.80) 
26,118,807.72 
25.610,821.92 



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137 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2010 



FUND PRINCIPAL 


BALANCE 
July 1, 2009 


DEPOSITS OTHER 


INCOME 


DRAWN 


BALANCE 
June 30, 2010 


STABILIZATION 




4,279,569.99 




153,570.71 




4,433,140.70 


CD. WOOD 




1,224,116.55 




44,374.11 


75,000.00 


1,193,490.66 


OPEBART21.2010 






258,120.00 






258,120.00 


ESTATE S.P. WHITE 


5,766.63 


16,151.88 




70.88 




16,222.76 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 




23,102.95 


6,919.00 


10.96 


10,308.80 


19,724.11 


TOWN 400TH CELEBRATION 




9,061.91 




327.32 




9,389.23 


J. GREELEY 


5,000.00 


7,489.89 




271.44 




7,761.33 


MARGARET G TOWLE 345,825.50 
MARGARET G TOWLE 


345,825.50 
89,647.67 




15,531.63 


10,864.61 


345,825.50 
94,314.69 


JOHN CORNELL 


5,000.00 


51,571.94 


1,430.00 


1,859.42 


1,700.00 


53,161.36 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


10,000.00 


48,535.74 




1,754.02 




50,289.76 


W.L RAYMOND 


7,845.81 


54,955.25 




1,986.45 




56,941.70 


A.J. LINCOLN 


5,000.00 


23,688.90 




103.96 




23,792.86 


E.I. RAYMOND 


1,302.77 


2,976.92 




107.57 




3,084.49 


TAYLOR 


300.00 


2,104.63 




76.04 




2,180.67 


SPRING GROVE 932,825.77 


940,606.07 


29,329.00 


50,844.26 


10,000.00 


1,010,779.33 


SPRING GROVE FLOWERS 




35,656.58 




1,293.57 


1,475.00 


35,475.15 


EMILINE LINCOLN 
EMMA J. LINCOLN 


1,000.00 


2,027.14 
1,110.56 




73.24 
40.14 




2,100.38 
1,150.70 


CONSERVATION FUND 




66,124.57 




2.389.70 




68,514.27 


SMART 


1,000.00 


15,776.04 




570.20 


15.00 


16,331.24 


FARRINGTON 




1,963.38 




71.00 


15.00 


2,019.38 


BALLARDVALE 




1,398.29 




50.59 


25.00 


1,423.88 


ALLEN 


200,00 


251.84 




9.16 


15.00 


246.00 


EMS BELL LIBRARY TRUST 




58,415.93 




2,115.65 




60,531.58 


ELDERLY TAXATION FUND 




12,627.19 




1,300 58 




13,927.77 


MUNICIPAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING 




7,976.78 


2,488.35 


345.44 




10,810.57 


DRAPER 




17,451.25 




630.69 




18,081.94 


RICHARDSON 


1,000.00 


1,533.15 




57.53 




1,590.68 


A &AV LINCOLN 


1,000.00 


1,153.08 




41.36 


- 


1,194.44 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 
RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


598.50 


598 50 
4,659.01 


253.96 


171.21 




598.50 
5,084.18 


CONROY 




1,772.92 




64.08 




1.837.00 


AMERICAN LEGION 




1,307.29 




47.26 




1,354.55 


CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 




4,640.17 


500.00 


176.86 


174.75 


5,142.28 


HOLT 




795.07 




28.74 




823.81 


INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 

INSURANCE 

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 
TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 
WORKERS COMPENSATION 




7,356,644.53 

164,306.98 
225,074.55 
286,386.33 
119.779.41 


299,040.31 0.00 

78,128.02 
150,000.00 
13,041,349.77 4,067,101.94 


280,365.77 

1 ,022.85 
929.13 
539 42 


109,593.16 

1,300.00 

286,408.17 

16,993,167.21 

107,602.00 


7,826.457.45 

242,157.85 

89,595.51 

402,210.25 

12.177,41 


TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 




795.547.27 


13,269,47779 4,067,101.94 


2,491.40 


17,388,477.38 


746,141.02 


GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 




8,152,191 80 


13,568.518.10 4,067,101.94 


282,857 17 


17.498.070 54 


8.572,598 47 



138 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF BONDS AUTHORIZED AND OUTSTANDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2010 



ARTICLE PROJECT NAME 



TOTAL AUTHORIZATION NEW 

AUTHORIZATION JULY 01, 2009 AUTHORIZATION 



BONDING 



AUTHORIZATION 
DECEMBER 31, 2010 



BANS 
OUTSTANDING 
DUE 2/25/2011 



SEWER ENTERPRISE 

ART 2A 2004 SOUTH MAIN AREA SEWERS 

ART 33 2006 REPAIR/REPLACEMENT SANITARY SEWER 

ART 64 2007 SHAWSHEEN PUMPING STATION 

ART 33 2008 SHAWSHEEN RIVER OUTFALL SEWER 

ART 51 2008 SEWER MAIN CONSTRUCTION & RECONST 

ART 32 2010 SEWER MAIN CONST & RECONST 

ART 46 2010 SEWER LINE EXT - LINCOLN ST 



WATER ENTERPRISE 

ART 34 2005 WATER TREAT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 
ART 31 2010 WATER MAIN CONST & RECONST 
ART 33 2020 WATER TREAT PLANT GAC REPLACE 
ART 34 2010 WATER TREAT PLANT - HVAC & EQUIP 



TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
LANDFILL CLOSURE 

ART 44 1 999 LANDFILL CLOSURE 

ART 43 2006 LANDFILL CAP/LEDGE ROAD 

ART 31 2008 LAND FILL CLOSURE 



SCHOOL 

ART 1 5 2007 SCHOOL ROOF REPLACEMENT 

ART 28 2007 SCHOOL BUILDING MAINT/IMPROVE 

ART 24 2008 FEASIBILITY STUDY BANCROFT SCHOOL 

ART 27 2008 SCHOOL BUILDING RENOVATION 

ART 56 2009 SCHOOL BLDG RENOVATION 

ART 59 2009 BANCROFT FEASIBILITY STUDY 

ART 41 2010 SCHOOL BLDG MAINT & RENOVATION 

ART 2A 201 1 BANCROF SCHOOL REPLACEMENT 



ROAD AND DRAINAGE 

ART 74 1 999 MAIN STREET STREETSCAPE 

ART 12 2001 LAND ACQUISITION LOWELL JCT RD 

ART 48 2002 MAIN STREET IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 52 2007 BRIDGE REPAIRS 

ART 32 2008 BRIDGE REPAIRS 

ART 50 2008 STORM DRAINAGE CONSTRUCTION & IMP 



CONSERVATION AND LAND ACQUSITION 

ART 23 2002 CONSERVATION FUND 

ART 55 2010 CONSERVATION LAND - FOSTERS POND 



ART 27 2007 
ART 48 2008 
ART 34 2009 
ART 55 2009 
ART 57 2009 
ART 58 2009 
ART 42 2010 
ART B1 2010 



TOWN BUILDINGS 

TOWN BUILDING MAINT/IMPROVE 
RECREATION PARK BALLFIELD LIGHTING 
BALLARDVALE FIRE STATION STUDY 
TOWN BUILDING RENOVATION 
BLANCHARD ST BALLFIELDS 
VETERANS MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 
TOWN BLDG MAINT & RENOVATION 
ACQUIRE BLANCHARD ST PROPERTY 



MISCELLANEOUS 

ART 36 2008 FIRE PUMPER TRUCK/DPW TRUCKS 
ART 30 2010 FIRE RESCUE AMBULANCE 
ART 40 2010 DPW VEHICLES 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
GRAND TOTAL 



2,500,000.00 
500,000.00 
750,000.00 

4,000,000.00 
500,000.00 


1,000,000.00 
150,000.00 
550,000.00 

2,500,000.00 
500,000.00 


500,000.00 
225.000.00 




1,000,000.00 
150,000.00 
550,000.00 

2,500,000.00 
500,000.00 
500,000.00 
225,000.00 


300,000.00 


8,250,000.00 
1,833,365.00 


4,700,000.00 
648.00 


725.000.00 

500,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

250,000.00 


0.00 


5,425,000.00 

648.00 

500,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

250,000.00 


300,000.00 


1,833,365.00 


648.00 


1,750,000.00 


0.00 


1,750,648.00 


0.00 


10,083,365.00 

2,200,000,00 

500,000.00 

7,370.000.00 


4,700,648.00 

1,700,000.00 

500.000.00 

7,370,000.00 


2,475,000.00 


0.00 

500,000.00 


7,175,648.00 

1,700,000.00 

0.00 

7,370,000.00 


300,000.00 

600,000.00 


10,070,000.00 

2,980,000.00 

1,065,000.00 

300,000.00 

1,810,000.00 


9,570,000.00 

1,500,000.00 
600,000.00 
300,000.00 

1,810,000.00 
850,000.00 
525,000.00 


0.00 

2,525,000.00 
43,835,000.00 


500,000.00 

1,500,000.00 
300,000.00 
300,000.00 

1,000,000.00 


9,070,000.00 

0.00 

300,000.00 

0.00 

810,000.00 

850,000.00 

525.000.00 

2,525,000.00 

43,835,000.00 


600,000.00 

300,000.00 

810,000.00 
850,000.00 
195,000.00 


6,155,000.00 

304,000.00 
2,000,000.00 
269,500.00 
100,000.00 
600,000.00 
380,000.00 


5,585,000.00 

224,000.00 
900,000.00 
269,500.00 
100,000.00 
600,000.00 
280,000.00 


46,360,000.00 


3,100,000.00 

224,000.00 
269,000.00 


48,845,000.00 

0.00 

900,000.00 
500.00 
100,000.00 
600,000.00 
280,000.00 


2,155,000.00 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 
300,000.00 
280,000.00 


3,653,500.00 
1,500,000.00 


2,373,500.00 
400,000.00 


0.00 
480,000.00 


493,000.00 


1,880,500.00 

400,000.00 
480,000.00 


780,000.00 


1,500,000.00 

955,000.00 
100,000.00 


400,000.00 

700,000.00 
100,000.00 
100,000.00 
650,000.00 
425,000.00 
650,000.00 


480,000.00 

163,000.00 
290,000.00 


0.00 

400,000.00 
100,000.00 


880,000.00 

300,000.00 
0.00 
100,000.00 
650,000.00 
425,000.00 
650,000.00 
163,000.00 
290,000.00 


0.00 

650,000.00 
100,000.00 


1,055,000.00 
440,000.00 


2,625,000.00 
973,000.00 


453,000.00 

225,000.00 
126,000.00 


500,000.00 
973,000.00 


2,578,000.00 

0.00 
225,000.00 
126,000.00 


750,000.00 


440,000.00 


973,000.00 


351,000.00 


973,000.00 


351,000.00 


0.00 


22,873,500.00 


21,526,500.00 


47,644,000.00 


5,566,000.00 


63,604,500.00 


4,285,000.00 


32,956,865.00 


26,227,148.00 


50,119,000.00 


5,566,000.00 


70,780,148.00 


4,585,000.00 



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145 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR SPECIAL STATE ELECTION ANDOVER MA 1/19/2010 

Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 Totals 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

SCOTT P. BROWN (REP) 
MARTHA COAKLEY (DEM) 
JOSEPH L KENNEDY (LIB) 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

Total votes 1524 1504 1709 1461 1554 1528 1632 1788 1632 14332 



729 


896 


932 


924 


941 


970 


968 


1025 


953 


8338 


782 


600 


764 


530 


607 


553 


649 


753 


667 


5905 


10 


7 


12 


5 


5 


5 


15 


10 


12 


81 


1 


1 


1 




















3 


2 








2 


1 














5 



146 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 3/23/2010 





PCT. 1 


PCT. 2 


PCT. 3 


PCT. 4 


PCT. 5 


PCT. 6 


PCT. 7 


PCT. 8 


PCT. 9 


Totals 


MODERATOR (1) 






















SHEILA M DOHERTY 


160 


131 


154 


109 


128 


113 


114 


161 


160 


1230 


Blanks 


45 


47 


51 


47 


40 


21 


33 


45 


65 


394 


Misc. Others 


1 


1 








3 


2 


3 


3 


2 


15 


Totals 


206 


179 


205 


156 


171 


136 


150 


209 


227 


1639 


BD. OF SELECTMEN (2) 






















GERALD STABILE, JR. 


126 


99 


146 


71 


94 


85 


81 


138 


132 


972 


ALEX J. VISPOLI 


165 


120 


140 


93 


116 


88 


112 


164 


157 


1155 


LAWRENCE J. BRUCE 


71 


73 


63 


89 


85 


62 


62 


53 


94 


652 


Blanks 


48 


62 


60 


59 


45 


37 


45 


61 


70 


487 


Misc. Others 


2 


4 


1 





2 








2 


1 


12 


Totals 


412 


358 


410 


312 


342 


272 


300 


418 


454 


3278 


SCHOOL COMM. (2) 






















RICHARD J. COLLINS 


125 


101 


135 


78 


102 


81 


91 


130 


117 


960 


PAULA COLBY-CLEMENTS 


147 


112 


128 


95 


122 


96 


99 


132 


156 


1087 


Blanks 


138 


143 


144 


139 


113 


94 


109 


150 


179 


1209 


Misc. Others 


2 


2 


3 





5 


1 


1 


6 


2 


22 


Totals 


412 


358 


410 


312 


342 


272 


300 


418 


454 


3278 


REG.VOC.TECH.SCHL.(l) 






















MARILYN M. FITZGERALD 


157 


124 


158 


111 


141 


111 


103 


152 


168 


1225 


Blanks 


48 


54 


47 


45 


28 


24 


47 


57 


59 


409 


Misc. Others 


1 


1 








2 


1 











5 


Totals 


206 


179 


205 


156 


171 


136 


150 


209 


227 


1639 


HOUSING AUTH. (1) 






















FRANCIS A. O'CONNOR 


147 


124 


141 


96 


124 


102 


101 


144 


158 


1137 


Blanks 


57 


55 


64 


60 


45 


34 


49 


65 


69 


498 


Misc. Others 


2 











2 














4 


Totals 


206 


179 


205 


156 


171 


136 


150 


209 


227 


1639 



147 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR STATE PRIMARY ANDOVER MA 09/14/ 2010 



DEMOCRAT 
























PREC1 


PREC2 


PREC3 


PREC4 


PREC5 


PREC6 


PREC7 


PREC8 


PREC9 


TOTAL: 


GOVERNOR 






















DEVAL L. PATRICK 


334 


292 


330 


202 


246 


233 


244 


319 


284 


2484 


Blanks 


110 


110 


105 


104 


98 


97 


101 


121 


119 


965 


Misc. Others 


4 


7 


5 


7 


1 


3 


.5 


6 


5 


43 


Totals 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 






















TIMOTHY P. MURRAY 


324 


291 


328 


203 


231 


231 


238 


302 


272 


2420 


Blanks 


124 


118 


111 


109 


114 


100 


111 


142 


136 


1065 


Misc. Others 








1 


1 





2 


1 


2 





7 


Totals 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 






















MARTHA COAKLEY 


342 


307 


337 


213 


240 


245 


234 


305 


290 


2513 


Blanks 


102 


100 


100 


95 


103 


85 


109 


137 


115 


946 


Misc. Others 


4 


2 


3 


5 


2 


3 


7 


4 


3 


33 


Totals 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


SECRETARY OF STATE 






















WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 


340 


302 


334 


205 


234 


244 


237 


308 


272 


2476 


Blanks 


108 


107 


106 


106 


110 


89 


111 


137 


136 


1010 


Misc. Others 











2 


1 





2 


1 





6 


Totals 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


TREASURER 






















STEVEN GROSSMAN 


228 


203 


225 


152 


176 


188 


169 


231 


217 


1789 


STEPHEN J. MURPHY 


127 


109 


120 


93 


85 


79 


96 


116 


94 


919 


Blanks 


92 


97 


95 


68 


84 


66 


85 


98 


96 


781 


Misc. Others 


1 




















1 


1 


3 


Totals 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


AUDITOR 






















SUZANNE M. BUMP 


214 


164 


198 


122 


148 


125 


129 


195 


145 


1440 


GUY WILLIAM GLODIS 


53 


63 


69 


54 


58 


65 


61 


52 


62 


537 


MIKE LAKE 


70 


68 


78 


52 


45 


64 


69 


78 


78 


602 


Blanks 


111 


113 


95 


85 


94 


79 


91 


121 


123 


912 


Misc. Others 





1 























1 


Totals 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















NICOLA S. TSONGAS 


341 


308 


339 


211 


252 


248 


249 


314 


292 


2554 


Blanks 


107 


101 


98 


98 


90 


84 


100 


129 


115 


922 


Misc. Others 








3 


4 


3 


1 


1 


3 


1 


16 


Totals 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


COUNCILLOR 






















MARY-ELLEN MANNING 


227 


201 


223 


164 


159 


160 


149 


214 


194 


1691 


JASON A. PANOS 


67 


66 


76 


48 


64 


63 


65 


63 


55 


567 


Blanks 


154 


142 


141 


101 


122 


110 


136 


169 


159 


1234 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


SENATOR. IN GENERAL COURT 




















BARRY R. FINEGOLD 


152 


139 


137 


103 


98 


126 


97 


121 


138 


1111 


JOHN A. KELLY 


5 


7 


6 


4 


4 


3 


2 


4 


2 


37 


DEBBIE SILBERSTEIN 


188 


177 


182 


114 


184 


126 


134 


227 


182 


1514 


JOHN J. WILSON, JR. 


97 


84 


115 


92 


58 


77 


114 


91 


81 


809 


Blanks 


5 


2 








1 


1 


3 


3 


5 


20 


Misc. Others 


1 


























1 


Totals 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 



148 



(Democrat cont...) 


PREC1 


PREC2 


PREC3 


PREC4 


PREC5 


PREC6 


PREC7 


PREC8 


PREC9 


TOTALS 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT (17TH) 




















FRANK J. BONET 


- 


37 


38 


45 


37 


46 


- 


- 


46 


249 


PATRICIA A. COMMANE 


- 


281 


322 


185 


244 


216 


- 


- 


268 


1516 


Blanks 


- 


89 


80 


82 


64 


71 


- 


- 


92 


478 


Misc. Others 


- 


2 





1 








- 


- 


2 


5 


Totals 


- 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


- 


- 


408 


2248 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT (18th Dist 


) 


















BARBARA A. L'lTALIEN 


344 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


254 


324 


- 


922 


Blanks 


104 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


94 


121 


- 


319 


Misc. Others 


. 


- 


- 


- 


. - 


- 


2 


1 


- 


3 


Totals 


448 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


350 


446 


- 


1244 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 






















JONATHAN W. BLODGETT 


308 


281 


288 


181 


215 


215 


212 


275 


238 


2213 


Blanks 


140 


128 


151 


130 


130 


117 


137 


170 


170 


1273 


Misc. Others 








1 


2 





1 


1 


1 





6 


Total 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


SHERIFF 






















DAMIAN M. ANKETELL 


285 


262 


272 


162 


197 


201 


189 


251 


223 


2042 


Blanks 


163 


147 


168 


147 


148 


132 


158 


195 


185 


1443 


Misc. Others 











4 








3 








7 


Total 


448 


409 


440 


313 


345 


333 


350 


446 


408 


3492 


REPUBLICAN 
























PREC1 


PREC2 


PREC3 


PREC4 


PREC5 


PREC6 


PREC7 


PREC8 


PREC9 


TOTALS 


GOVERNOR 






















CHARLES D. BAKER 


205 


218 


243 


221 


222 


220 


259 


255 


231 


2074 


Blanks 


22 


23 


27 


30 


20 


24 


32 


18 


15 


211 


Misc. Others 





5 





1 


4 


3 


6 





2 


21 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 






















RICHARD R. TISEI 


191 


204 


220 


200 


193 


204 


231 


234 


210 


1887 


KEITH DAVIS (write-in cand.) 





3 


2 





2 


3 


2 


2 


1 


15 


Blanks 


36 


39 


48 


52 


51 


40 


64 


36 


37 


403 


Misc. Others 























1 





1 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 






















JAMES MCKENNA (write-in cand.) 


25 


22 


22 


25 


20 


38 


54 


50 


28 


284 


GUY CARBONE (write-in cand.) 


14 


22 


21 


9 


20 


8 


21 


14 


19 


148 


Blanks 


184 


199 


225 


215 


204 


198 


222 


204 


197 


1848 


Misc. Others 


4 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 





5 


4 


26 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 


SECRETARY OF STATE 






















WILLIAM C. CAMPBELL 


165 


199 


202 


179 


186 


196 


219 


216 


195 


1757 


Blanks 


62 


47 


68 


73 


60 


50 


76 


57 


53 


546 


Misc. Others 

















1 


2 








3 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 


TREASURER 






















KARYN E. POLITO 


174 


201 


208 


187 


188 


197 


216 


219 


196 


1786 


Blanks 


53 


45 


62 


65 


58 


49 


80 


54 


52 


518 


Misc. Others 

















1 


1 








2 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 



149 



(Republican cont...) 


PREC1 


PREC2 


PREC3 


PREC4 


PREC5 


PREC6 


PREC7 


PREC8 


PREC9 


TOTALS 


AUDITOR 






















MARY Z. CONNAUGHTON 


147 


166 


181 


167 


165 


159 


207 


187 


159 


1538 


KAMAL JAIN 


41 


47 


47 


43 


43 


56 


41 


43 


59 


420 


Blanks 


39 


33 


42 


42 


38 


32 


49 


42 


30 


347 


Misc. Others 























1 





1 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















JONATHAN A. GOLNIK 


37 


57 


77 


73 


49 


43 


65 


65 


65 


531 


SAM S. MEAS 


52 


57 


54 


43 


38 


50 


62 


80 


31 


467 


ROBERT L. SHAPIRO 


83 


95 


107 


104 


124 


117 


119 


100 


119 


968 


THOMAS J.M. WEAVER 


36 


27 


20 


16 


22 


27 


30 


13 


24 


215 


Blanks 


19 


10 


12 


15 


12 


10 


19 


14 


9 


120 


Misc. Others 











1 


1 





2 


1 





5 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 


COUNCILLOR 






















Blanks 


226 


246 


269 


249 


246 


247 


294 


266 


248 


2291 


Misc. Others 


1 





1 


3 








3 


7 





15 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 




















PATRICK J. RAHILLY 


44 


41 


59 


35 


28 


56 


38 


33 


34 


368 


JAMISON TOMASEK 


155 


178 


182 


192 


184 


174 


229 


216 


196 


1706 


Blanks 


27 


26 


29 


24 


34 


16 


28 


24 


18 


226 


Misc. Others 


1 


1 





1 





1 


2 








6 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 


(17th Dist 


■) 


















PAUL ADAMS 


- 


106 


98 


115 


154 


120 


- 


- 


116 


709 


SALIM (SAL) R. TAB1T 


- 


125 


162 


130 


86 


120 


- 


- 


127 


750 


Blanks 


- 


15 


10 


7 


6 


7 


- 


- 


5 


50 


Misc. Others 


- 

















- 


- 








Totals 


- 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


- 


- 


248 


1509 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 


(18th Dist 


■) 


















JAMES J. LYONS, JR. 


111 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


218 


171 


- 


500 


JOHN 0. THORLIN 


102 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


73 


84 


- 


259 


Blanks 


14 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


18 


- 


38 


Misc. Others 





- 


- 


- 


- 


- 








- 





Totals 


227 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


297 


273 


- 


797 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 






















Blanks 


226 


246 


268 


251 


244 


247 


296 


263 


243 


2284 


Misc. Others 


1 





2 


1 


2 





1 


10 


5 


22 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 


SHERIFF 






















FRANK G. COUSINS, JR. 


166 


192 


201 


170 


180 


187 


200 


204 


185 


1685 


Blanks 


61 


54 


68 


82 


66 


58 


97 


68 


63 


617 


Misc. Others 








1 








2 





1 





4 


Totals 


227 


246 


270 


252 


246 


247 


297 


273 


248 


2306 



LIBERTARIAN 

GOVERNOR 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 



PREC 1 PREC 2 PREC 3 PREC 4 PREC 5 PREC 6 PREC 7 PREC 8 PREC 9 TOTALS 



15 



1 



1 



(Libertarian cont..) 


PREC 1 PREC 2 


PREC 3 


PREC 4 


PREC 5 


PREC 6 


PREC 7 


PREC 8 


PREC 9 


TOTALS 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 
























Blanks 







2 














1 








3 


Misc. Others 






























1 


Totals 







2 





















4 


SECRETARY OF STATE 
























Blanks 







2 





















4 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 







2 





















4 


TREASURER 
























Blanks 







2 





















4 


Misc. Others 




. 



























• Totals 







2 





















4 


AUDITOR 
























Blanks 







2 





















4 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 







2 





















4 


REP. IN CONGRESS 
























Blanks 







2 





















3 


Misc. Others 






























1 


Totals 







2 





















4 


COUNCILLOR 
























Blanks 







2 





















4 


Misc. Others 

































Totals 







2 





















4 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 






















Blanks 







2 





















3 


Misc. Others 





























1 


Totals 







2 





















4 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 


(17th Dist.) 




















Blanks 




- 


2 














- 


- 





2 


Misc. Others 




- 

















- 


- 




1 


Totals 




- 


2 














- 


- 




3 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 


(18th Dist.) 




















Blanks 







- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 





- 


1 


Misc. Others 







- 


- 


- 


- 


- 








- 





Totals 







- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 





- 


1 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
























Blanks 







2 














1 





1 


4 


Misc. Others 


































Totals 







2 














1 





1 


4 


SHERIFF 
























Blanks 







2 














1 





1 


4 


Misc. Others 


































Totals 







2 














1 





1 


4 



151 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR STATE ELECTION ANDOVER M* 11/02/ 2010 
PREC 1 PREC 2 PREC 3 PREC 4 PREC 5 PREC 6 PREC 7 PREC 8 PREC 9 TOTALS 



GOVERNOR & LT. GOVERNOR 






















PATRICK & MURRAY 


765 


606 


751 


543 


602 


576 


661 


739 


650 


5893 


BAKER & Tisei 


699 


791 


795 


807 


868 


893 


877 


938 


872 


7540 


Cahill & Loscocco 


64 


92 


96 


63 


49 


54 


73 


67 


64 


622 


Stein & Purcell 


13 


22 


12 


7 


6 


13 


11 


19 


19 


122 


Blanks 


9 


3 


12 


9 


8 


6 


13 


13 


6 


79 


Misc. Others 


2 








1 


3 








1 





7 


Totals 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 






















MARTHA COAKLEY 


944 


822 


991 


727 


775 


802 


856 


969 


883 


7769 


JAMES MCKENNA 


586 


661 


650 


673 


732 


715 


742 


776 


700 


6235 


Blanks 


20 


30 


25 


29 


29 


24 


37 


32 


28 


254 


Misc. Others 


2 


1 





1 





1 











5 


Totals 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


SECRETARY OF STATE 






















WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 


936 


809 


953 


751 


775 


792 


826 


922 


859 


7623 


WILLIAM C. CAMPBELL 


531 


623 


614 


611 


680 


671 


714 


761 


655 


5860 


JAMES D. HENDERSON 


27 


34 


35 


17 


21 


31 


30 


24 


31 


250 


Blanks 


56 


48 


64 


49 


59 


47 


65 


70 


66 


524 


Misc. Others 


2 








2 


1 


1 











6 


Totals 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


TREASURER 






















STEVEN GROSSMAN 


819 


651 


795 


603 


643 


631 


690 


755 


726 


6313 


KARYN E. POLITO 


685 


799 


796 


777 


836 


856 


881 


940 


818 


7388 


Blanks 


48 


63 


75 


50 


56 


55 


64 


82 


67 


560 


Misc. Others 





1 








1 














2 


Totals 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


AUDITOR 






















SUZANNE M. BUMP 


668 


528 


666 


458 


502 


499 


562 


581 


544 


5008 


MARY Z. CONNAUGHTON 


733 


806 


818 


821 


883 


889 


898 


1003 


875 


7726 


NATHANIEL A. FORTUNE 


47 


67 


56 


48 


44 


44 


54 


63 


73 


496 


Blanks 


102 


113 


126 


102 


105 


109 


121 


130 


117 


1025 


Misc. Others 


2 








1 


2 


1 








2 


8 


Totals 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


REP. IN CONGRESS - 5TH DISTRICT 




















NICOLA S. TSONGAS 


888 


740 


866 


658 


736 


711 


809 


901 


805 


7114 


JONATHAN A. GOLNIK 


618 


713 


742 


729 


762 


787 


779 


825 


759 


6714 


DALE E. BROWN 


13 


19 


20 


11 


11 


19 


15 


17. 


13 


138 


ROBERT M. CLARK 


8 


10 


7 


5 


2 


4 


5 


6 


6 


53 


Blanks 


22 


32 


31 


26 


23 


21 


27 


28 


27 


237 


Misc. Others 


3 








1 


2 











1 


7 


Totals 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


COUNCILLOR - 5TH DISTRICT 




















MARY-ELLEN MANNING 


980 


889 


1009 


815 


875 


863 


911 


1006 


930 


8278 


Blanks 


569 


618 


645 


592 


638 


649 


716 


739 


675 


5841 


Misc. Others 


3 


7 


12 


23 


23 


30 


8 


32 


6 


144 


Totals 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


SENATOR. IN GENERAL COURT - 2ND ESSEX & MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 










BARRY R. FINEGOLD 


819 


703 


834 


623 


712 


689 


749 


832 


734 


6695 


JAMISON TOMASEK 


625 


690 


715 


707 


753 


757 


784 


832 


736 


6599 


JODI B. OBERTI 


62 


82 


80 


64 


37 


57 


64 


67 


94 


607 


Blanks 


44 


39 


35 


33 


33 


38 


38 


46 


46 


352 


Misc. Others 


2 





2 


143^ 2 


1 


1 








1 


10 


Totals 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 



REP. IN GENERAL COURT - 17TH ESSEX DISTRICT 



PAUL ADAMS 





793 


776 


816 


892 


857 








830 


4964 


PATRICIA A. COMMANE 





653 


812 


555 


582 


608 








687 


3897 


Blanks 





68 


77 


57 


61 


77 








94 


434 


Misc. Others 








1 


2 


1 














4 


Totals 





1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 








1611 


9299 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT - 


18th ESSEX DISTRICT 
















BARBARA A. L'lTALIEN 


865 

















737 


869 





2471 


JAMES J. LYONS, JR. 


646 

















852 


871 





2369 


Blanks 


39 

















46 


36 





121 


Misc. Others 


2 




















1 





3 


Totals 


1552 


. 














1635 


1777 





4964 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY - EASTERN DISTRICT 


















JONATHAN W. BLODGETT 


1008 


908 


1011 


848 


872 


891 


938 


1025 


938 


8439 


Blanks 


541 


598 


654 


561 


648 


626 


693 


733 


668 


5722 


Misc. Others 


3 


8 


1 


21 


16 


25 


4 


19 


5 


102 


Total 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


SHERIFF - ESSEX COUNTY 






















FRANK G. COUSINS, JR. 


825 


876 


924 


883 


928 


948 


955 


1061 


925 


8325 


DAMIAN M. ANKETELL 


494 


414 


450 


330 


369 


344 


395 


423 


390 


3609 


KEVIN J. LEACH 


85 


92 


110 


89 


99 


97 


102 


105 


109 


888 


Blanks 


147 


132 


182 


125 


139 


153 


182 


187 


187 


1434 


Misc. Others 


1 








3 


1 





1 


1 





7 


Total 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


QUESTION 1 






















YES 


780 


823 


907 


823 


869 


876 


916 


1006 


895 


7895 


NO 


742 


650 


729 


577 


644 


628 


692 


733 


687 


6082 


BLANKS 


30 


41 


30 


30 


23 


38 


27 


38 


29 


286 


TOTALS 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


QUESTION 2 






















YES 


614 


685 


748 


770 


802 


697 


760 


815 


699 


6590 


NO 


852 


729 


821 


600 


643 


755 


773 


854 


811 


6838 


BLANKS 


86 


100 


97 


60 


91 


90 


102 


108 


101 


835 


TOTALS 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 


QUESTION 3 






















YES 


647 


724 


730 


725 


754 


772 


779 


864 


768 


6763 


NO 


885 


766 


914 


687 


760 


754 


836 


891 


823 


7316 


BLANKS 


20 


24 


22 


18 


22 


16 


20 


22 


20 


184 


TOTALS 


1552 


1514 


1666 


1430 


1536 


1542 


1635 


1777 


1611 


14263 



153 



QUESTION 1: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 
Representatives before May 4, 2010? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would remove the Massachusetts sales tax on alcoholic beverages and alcohol, 
where the sale of such beverages and alcohol or their importation in the state is already subject to a 
separate excise tax under state law. The proposed law would take effect on January 1, 201 1. 
A YES VOTE would remove the state sales tax on alcoholic beverages and alcohol where their sale or 
importation in the state is subject to an excise tax under state law. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the state sales tax on alcoholic beverages and alcohol. 



QUESTION 2: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 
Representatives before May 4, 20 1 0? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would repeal an existing state law that allows a qualified organization wishing 
to build government-subsidized housing that includes low- or moderate-income units to apply for a single 
comprehensive permit from a city or town's board of appeals (ZBA), instead of separate permits from 
each local agency or official having jurisdiction over any aspect of the proposed housing. The repeal 
would take effect on January 1, 201 1 but would not stop or otherwise affect any proposed housing that 
had already received both a comprehensive permit and a building permit for at least one unit. 

Under the existing law, the ZBA holds a public hearing on the application and considers the 
recommendations of local agencies and officials. The ZBA may grant a comprehensive permit that may 
include conditions or requirements concerning the height, site plan, size, shape or building materials of 
the housing. Persons aggrieved by the ZBA's decision to grant a permit may appeal it to a court. If the 
ZBA denies the permit or grants it with conditions or requirements that make the housing uneconomic to 
build or to operate, the applicant may appeal to the state Housing Appeals Committee (HAC). 

After a hearing, if the HAC rules that the ZBA's denial of a comprehensive permit was 
unreasonable and not consistent with local needs, the HAC orders the ZBA to issue the permit. If the 
HAC rules that the ZBA's decision issuing a comprehensive permit with conditions or requirements made 
the housing uneconomic to build or operate and was not consistent with local needs, the HAC orders the 
ZBA to modify or remove any such condition or requirement so as to make the proposal no long 
uneconomic. The HAC cannot order the ZBA to issue any permit that would allow the housing to fall 
below minimum safety standards or site plan requirements. If the HAC rules that the ZBA's action was 
consistent with local needs, the HAC must uphold it even if it made the housing uneconomic. The HAC's 
decision is subject to review in the courts. 

A condition or requirement makes housing "uneconomic" if it would prevent a public agency or 
non-profit organization from building or operating the housing except at a financial loss, or it would 
prevent a limited dividend organization from building or operating the housing without a reasonable 
return on its investment. 

A ZBA's decision is "consistent with local needs" if it applies requirements that are reasonable in 
view of the regional need for low- and moderate-income housing and the number of low-income persons 
in the city or town, as well as the need to protect health and safety, promote better site and building 
design, and preserve open space, if those requirements are applied as equally as possible to both 
subsidized and unsubsidized housing. Requirements are considered "consistent with local needs" if more 

154 



than 10% of the city or town's housing units are low- or moderate-income units or if such units are on 

sites making up at least 1/5% of the total private land zoned for residential, commercial, or industrial use 

in the city or town. Requirements are also considered "consistent with local needs" if the application 

would result, in any one calendar year, in beginning construction of low- or moderate-income housing on 

sites making up more than 0.3% of the total private land zoned for residential, commercial or industrial 

use in the city or town, or on ten acres, whichever is larger. The proposed law state that if any of its parts 

were declared invalid, the other parts would stay in effect. 

A YES VOTE would repeal the state law allowing the issuance of a single comprehensive permit to build 

housing that includes low- or moderate-income units. 

A NO VOTE would make no change in the state law allowing issuance of such a comprehensive permit. 



QUESTION 3: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the State or the House of 
Representatives before May 4, 2010? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would reduce the state sales and use tax rates (which were 6.25% as of 
September 2009) to 3% as of January 1, 2011. It would make the same reduction in the rate used to 
determine the amount to be deposited with the state Commissioner of Revenue by non-resident building 
contractors as security for the payment of sales and use tax on tangible personal property used in carrying 
out their contracts. 

The proposed law provides that if the 3% rates would not produce enough revenues to satisfy any 
lawful pledge of sales and use tax revenues in connection with any bond, note, or other contractual 
obligation, then the rates would instead be reduced to the lowest level allowed by law. 

The proposed law would not affect the collection of monies due the Commonwealth for sales, 
storage, use or other consumption of tangible personal property or services occurring before January 1, 
2011. 

The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the other parts would stay in 
effect. 

A YES VOTE would reduce the state sales and use tax rates to 3%. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the state sales and use tax rates. 



155 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION WARRANT 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on February 22, 2010, the Inhabitants of said 
Town who are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the 
designated polling place. All nine precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, 
Eight, and Nine are to vote at the Collins Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, 
in said Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY-THIRD OF FEBRUARY, 2010 

at seven o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 
have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes 
stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each 
school house and in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and 
published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 

Constable 

ARTICLE 1. Results of the Annual Town Election on March 23, 2010: Moderator for one 
year, two Selectmen for three years, two School Committee members for three years, one 
member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years and one member of the Greater 
Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical School District Committee for two years. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 22, 2010, the Inhabitants of said 
Town who are qualified to vote in Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling 
place. All nine precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, and Nine are 
to vote at the Collins Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

WEDNESDAY, THE TWENTY-EIGHTH DAY OF APRIL, 2010 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 
have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes 
stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each 
school house and in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and 
published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 
Constable 



156 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 28, 2010 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed six hundred and fifty two (652) voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:00 P.M. 

The American Legion Post 8 presented the posting of the Flag. 

The opening prayer was giving by the Rabbi Robert S. Goldstein, Temple Emanuel, Andover. 

There was a moment of silence for the deceased that have worked and lived in the Town. 

The Salute to the flag was led by Alex J. Vispoli, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen. 

Sarah Brown, a Junior at Andover High School, sang the opening song "America", written by 

Samuel Francis Smith while he was living in the Town of Andover. 

Upon unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit ninety two (92) non-voters to the meeting and 
escort non-voters to the non- voting section thereafter. 

The Moderator took a vote to limit presenters of articles to five minutes of speaking time and 
speakers to three minutes. The motion passed by a Majority vote. 

The Moderator announced various housekeeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the order of speakers for the meeting, use of Pro and Con Microphones, 
the location of microphones, stage participants and the location of voting sections. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or drinks (except water) in the 
Gymnasium. 

The Moderator introduced Atty. Christopher Vrountas as the Town Meeting "Ombudsman", and 
reminded meeting members that he would help them with questions on Town Meeting 
procedures and amendments to articles. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 



ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three years, one School 
Committee member for three years and one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five 
years and five Trustees of the Punchard Free School for three years. 



157 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



The Town Clerk reported following were elected to office: 

Moderator One For One Year 



Board of Selectmen 



School Committee 



Two For Three Years 



Two For Three Years 



Sheila M. Doherty 
9 Juniper Road 

Gerald Stabile, Jr. 

8 Blueberry Hill Road 
Alex J. Vispoli 

7 Alison Way 

Paula Colby-Clements 
119 Chestnut Street 

Richard J. Collins 
117 Lovejoy Road 



Greater Lawrence Regional 
Vocational Technical School 
District 



One For Two Years 



Marilyn M. Fitzgerald 
25 Washington Ave. 



Andover Housing Authority One For Five Years 



Francis A. O'Connor 
22 Railroad Street 



Election Not Required by Ballot 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot, or take any 
other action related there. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Calvin G. Perry, 
25 Timothy Drive, 1 1 Lovejoy Road, be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 

Salaries of Elected Officials 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the salaries of the 
elected Town Officers be established as follows: 



Town Moderator 



Selectmen 



$250.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $60.00 for each 
Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual 
Town Meeting. 
Chairman -$1,800.00 
Members- $1,500.00 



158 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



School Committee - Chairman - $1,800.00 
Members- $1,500.00 

The Town Clerk presided over the vote for the Moderator's salary. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: . Approval 

FY-2011 Budget 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will 
raise and appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and 
expenses of the Town, including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the 
Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2010 and ending June 30, 2011, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 



ARTICLE 4-2010 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FY 2011 Budget 
LINE 
ITEM DEPARTMENT APPROVED FY 2011 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
PUBLIC SAFETY by a Majority Vote: 
PUBLIC SAFETY 

1 PERSONAL SERVICES 12,854,082 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 1,295.910 
TOTAL 14,149,992 

Includes $278,864 - parking receipts, $70,000 - detail fees, and $955,000 - ambulance collections 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT by a Majority Vote: 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES 4,237,482 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 1,395.358 
TOTAL 5,632,840 

Includes $20,000 in receipts from wetland filing fees. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 



159 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
PUBLIC WORKS by a Majority Vote: 

PUBLIC WORKS 

5 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,628,398 

6 OTHER EXPENSES 3,582,800 
TOTAL 5,211,198 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
Plant AND FACILITIES by a Majority Vote: 
PLANT AND FACILITIES 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES 3,079,484 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 1,361,941 
TOTAL 4,441,425 

Includes $55,000 in rental receipts; $34,000 perpetual care income and $60,000 from cemetery fees. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
LIBRARY by a Majority Vote: 
LIBRARY 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES 2,018,773 

10 OTHER EXPENSES 576,400 
TOTAL 2,595,173 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
COMMUNITY/YOUTH SERVICES/ELDER SERVICES by a Majority Vote: 
COMMUNITY / YOUTH/ ELDER SERVICES 

11 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,220,987 

12 OTHER EXPENSES 437,619 
TOTAL 1,658,606 

Includes $550,000 and $55,000 in user fees and $66,500 in grants 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 



160 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
UNCLASSIFIED by a Majority Vote: 
UNCLASSIFIED 

13 COMPENSATION FUND 

14 RESERVE FUND 200,000 
TOTAL 200,000 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT by a Majority Vote: 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPT 

15 PERSONAL SERVICES 48,629,563 

16 OTHER EXPENSES 13,258.858 
TOTAL 61,888,421 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
SEWER by a Majority Vote: 
SEWER 

17 PERSONAL SERVICES 437,503 

18 OTHER EXPENSES 1,995,244 
TOTAL 2,432,747 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
WATER by a Majority Vote: 

WATER 

19 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,700,053 

20 OTHER EXPENSES 2,176,400 
TOTAL 3,876,453 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 



161 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL by a Majority Vote: 

2 1 GR LAW TECH HS 484,924 

TOTAL 484,924 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 



12,002,493 
640,500 
204,000 

4,712,555 
13,362,241 
30,921,789 



FIXED by ; 


a Majority Vote: 




FLXED 


22 


DEBT SERVICE 


23 


GENERAL INSURANCE 


24 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMP. 


25 


RETIREMENT FUND 


26 


HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 




TOTAL 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 



GRAND TOTAL 133,493,568 

less budgeted Revenues (2,144,364) 

NET TOTAL 131,349,204 



ARTICLE 4 - 2010 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FY 2011 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM FREE CASH 

Article 7 Supplemental Appropriations- FY2010 

F Y20 1 Health Insurance $200,000.00 

FY20 1 Unemployment Compensation $50,000.00 

F Y20 1 School Department - Other Expenses $650,000.00 

Article 15 Repairs to Private Ways - Foster Pond Rd & Pomeroy Rd $54,000.00 

Article 17 Jerry Silverman Fireworks $12,000.00 

Article 21 Other Post Employment Benefit Trust Fund $157,500.00 

TOTAL $1,123,500.00 

162 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

From Article 4-2009-General Government - Other 
Article 6 Expenses 

From Article 4-2009-Community, Elder & Youth Services 



$33,000.00 



Other Expenses $9,000.00 

From Article 4-2009-Plant & Facilities-Other Expenses $32,000.00 

From Article 4-2009-Public Safety - Other Expenses $30,000.00 

From Article 4-2009-Public Works - Other Expenses $85,000.00 

From Article 4-2009-Sewer - Other Expenses $46,000.00 

From Article 4-FY2009- Water - Other Expenses $52,000.00 

From Article 4-FY2009-Library - Others Expenses $13,000.00 

TOTAL $300,000.00 



To General Government - Personal Services 



TOTAL 



Article 18 From Insurance Proceeds in Excess of $20,000 Account 

To Municipal Building/Insurance Fund 



$300,000.00 
$300,000.00 

$78,128.02 
$78,128.02 



Article 51 From Wood Memorial Trust 

To Fence and Tree Restoration Program at Wood Park 



$75,000.00 
$75,000.00 



RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 



NONE 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - GENERAL FUND BORROWING 

Article 30 Fire Rescue Ambulance 

Article 40 DPW Vehicles 

Article 41 School Building Maintenance & Renovation 

Article 42 Town Building maintenance & Renovation 

Article 55 Conservation land Acquisition Fund - Fosters Pond 



TOTAL 



$225,000.00 
$126,000.00 

$2,525,000.00 
$163,000.00 
$480,000.00 

$3,519,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES -WATER/ SEWER FUND BORROWING 

Article 31 Water Main Construction & Reconstruction 

Article 32 Sewer Main Construction & Reconstruction 

Article 33 Water Treatment Plant - GAC Replacement 

Article 34 Water Treatment Plant - HVAC Systems & Equipment 

Article 46 Sewer Line Extension - Lincoln Street 

TOTAL 



$500,000.00 
$500,000.00 

$1,000,000.00 
$250,000.00 
$225,000.00 

$2,475,000.00 



163 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53 1/2 REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 

Article 14 A Community Development and Planning Department $140,000.00 

Article 14 B Memorial Hall Library - Lost/Damaged Materials $20,000.00 

Article 14 C Health Clinic $40,000.00 

Article 14 D Division of Community Services $605,000.00 

Article 14 E Division of Youth Services $400,000.00 

Article 14 F Field Maintenance $100,000.00 

Article 14 G Division of Elder Services $200,000.00 

Article 14 H Public Safety Radio/ Antenna Frequency $50,000.00 

Article 141 Memorial Hall Library Audio/Visual $40,000.00 

Article 14 J School Photocopy Center $20,000.00 

Article 14 K Compost Program $60,000.00 

Article 14 L Solid Waste $40,000.00 

Article 14 M Stormwater Management $30,000.00 

Article 14 N Fire Rescue $200,000.00 

TOTAL $1,945,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 

Article 5 Capital Projects Fund FY 2011 $1,246,000.00 

Article 22 Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program $12,000.00 

TOTAL $1,258,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM WATER RESERVES 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM SEWER RESERVES 

Article 21 From Sewer Reserves $100,620.00 

To Other Post Employment Benefit Trust Fund $100,620.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM OVERLAY SURPLUS 

Article 19 From Overlay Surplus $351,404.13 

to Allowance for Abatements & Exemptions Accounts: 

FY2004 $26,323.14 

FY2005 $9,599.95 

FY2008 $154,246.16 



164 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 

FY2009 $161,234.88 

TOTAL $351,404.13 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM PARKING RECEIPTS 

NONE 



A true record 
ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
ActingTown Clerk 



FY-2011 Capital Projects Fund Appropriation 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$1,875,000 for the purpose of funding the Fiscal Year 201 1 appropriation for the Capital Projects 
Fund or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 5 be 
approved as printed in the warrant in the amount of $1,246,000 from taxation. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Budget Transfers 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at 
the 2009 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by MGL Chapter 44, Section 33B, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town vote to 
transfer funds from the following 2009 Annual Town Meeting- Article 4 appropriations: 

$ 33,000 from General Government - Other Expenses 

$ 9,000 from Community, Elder & Youth Services - Other Expenses 

165 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



$ 32,000 from Plant and Facilities - Other Expenses 

$ 30,000 from Public Safety - Other Expenses 

$ 85,000 from Public Works - Other Expenses 

$ 46,000 from Sewer - Other Expenses 

$ 52,000 from Water - Other Expenses 

$ 13,000 from Library - Other Expenses 

And appropriate the sum of $300,000 for General Government - Personal Services 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Supplemental Budget Appropriations 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
supplement appropriations voted at the May 2009 Annual Town Meeting and the October 7, 
2009 Special Town Meeting, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
$900,000 from Free Cash and appropriate a sum of $200,000 to FY2010 Health Insurance; 
$50,000 to FY2010 Unemployment Compensation; and $650,000 to FY2010 School 
Department-Other Expenses appropriation. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Free Cash 

ARTICLE 8. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash 
to reduce the Fiscal Year 2011 tax rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 2010 Annual 
Town Meeting, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 8 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Unexpended Appropriations 

ARTICLE 9. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash 
in the treasury, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 



166 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 9 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

General Housekeeping Articles 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote the following consent articles, or take any other 
action related thereto: 

A. Grant Program Authorization 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of 
any funds allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government 
under any State or Federal grant program, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

B. Road Contracts 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract with 
the Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners or the Federal Government for the 
construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

C. Town Report 

To act upon the report of the Town officers, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

D. Property Tax Exemptions 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts 
of 1986 as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal Year 2011 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

E. Contracts in Excess of Three Years 

To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 3 OB, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager or the Superintendent of 
Schools to solicit and award contracts for terms exceeding three years but no greater than five 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



years, including any renewal, extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term is 
determined to be in the best interest of the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or the 
School Committee, as appropriate, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

F. Accepting Easements 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to accept grants of easements for streets, water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes 
or any public purpose on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best 
interests of the Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

G. Rescinding of Bond Authorizations 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior Town 
Meetings, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
the consent agenda, Articles 10A through 10F. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 1 0G be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Granting Easements 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to grant easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes or any public 
purpose on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the 
Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the Town approve Article 1 1 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Unpaid Bills 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 12 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Chapter 90 Authorizations 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway 
Construction or any other federal or state aid program for road or sidewalk improvements, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 26 as 
printed in the Warrant. 



VOTE: 



Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator 



A 2/3 vote required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Revolving Accounts 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the following revolving funds for 
certain Town departments under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2 for 
the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2010, or take any other action related thereto: 



Authorized to 


Use of Fund 


Revenue Source 


Revolving Fund 


FY-2011 Limit 


Spend 










Division Heads 


Advertising legal 
hearing notice 
expenses for 
permit 
applications 


Applicant Fees 


A. Community 
Development & 
Planning 
Department 


$140,000 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



MHL Director 


Replacement of 


Restitution 


B. Memorial 


$20,000 




lost/damaged 


payments 


Hall Library- 






library materials 


/charges to 
borrower or 
patron 


Lost/Damaged 
Materials 




Public Health 


Clinic supplies 


Clinic 


C. Health Clinic 


$40,000 


Director 


and other 
expenses 


participant fees 






Community 


Trips, ticket 


Participant fees 


D. Division of 


$605,000 


Services 


sales and special 




Community 




Director 


programs and 
activities 




Services 




Youth Services 


All programs 


Participant fees 


E. Division of 


$400,000 


Director 


and activities 
expenses, part- 
time help 




Youth Services 




Plant and 


Field 


Field rental fees 


F. Field 


$100,000 


Facilities 


maintenance, 




Maintenance 




Director 


upgrade and 
related expenses 








Elder Services 


Senior programs, 


Participant fees 


G. Division of 


$200,000 


Director 


classes and 
activities 




Elder Services 




Chief of Police 


Maintenance and 


Lease 


H. Police 


$50,000 




purchase of 


agreements for 


Communications 






public safety 


antenna users 








radio and 










antennae 










equipment 








MHL Director 


Purchase of 


Rental of 


I. Memorial 


$40,000 




audio/visual 


audio/visual 


Hall Library 






materials 


materials 


Audio/Visual 




School Dept. 


Photocopy 


External Private 


J. School 


$20,000 




Center Costs 


Groups 


Photocopy Fees 




Plant & 


Offset Compost 


Contractor 


K. Compost 


$60,000 


Facilities 


Monitoring and 


permit fees, 


Program 




Director 


Cleanup 

Expenses 


revenues from 
sale of compost 






Public Works 


Offset Trash & 


CRT, HHW & 


L. Solid Waste 


$40,000 


Director 


Recycling Costs 


Trash fees 







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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Planning 


Consulting and 


Applicant 


M. Stormwater 


$30,000 


Director 


environmental 
monitoring of 
Stormwater 
Management 
applications and 
permits 




Management 




Fire Chief 


Training and 
Equipment 


Service Fees 


N. Fire Rescue 


$200,000 



On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted by a Majority vote to approve Article 27 A, 
B, C, D, E G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N - Revolving Accounts - as printed in the Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to approve Article 14F 
- Revolving Accounts - as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Repairs to Private Ways - Fosters Pond Road and Pomeroy Road 

ARTICLE 15. In accordance with the provisions of that section of the General By-laws added 
to Article XII (Miscellaneous By-laws) by Warrant Article 52 of the May 2009 Annual Town 
Meeting , the undersigned abutters of Fosters Pond and Pomeroy Road hereby petition the Town 
to make any and all repairs to these roads, including resurfacing and drainage work, necessary 
for safe and convenient travel by the public and to assess betterments thereof. Town Department 
of Public Works estimate is $54,000 to be divided evenly by 37 parcel owners. 

On petition of James Cyrier and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate $54,000 from 
free cash for repairing Fosters Pond Road and Pomeroy Road, including costs incidental or 
related thereto; and further, that, under the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 40, §6N, and Town 
Bylaw Art. XII §46, the fall cost of said services be allocated, based on a fixed uniform unit 
method, and those allocated amounts be assessed against, and collected from, those property 
owners abutting the improvements to be made in accordance with this vote; and that the Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to take any actions necessary or convenient to carry out this project. 



VOTE: 



Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator 



A 2/3 vote required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Street Lights 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to turn 626 street lights back on that were turned off 
in 2009, and to transfer the following funds from the Free Cash Line item account to the Street 
Light Expenditure account #014242-521 1 - in amounts not less than $15,650.00 for the turn on 
of said street lights and not less than $40,000 to replenish the budget for the continuation of the 
operating expense, resulting in a total of not less than $55,650.00, and that the Town shall take 
every affirmative act to ensure that the restoration of the street lights be permanent. 

On petition of Chester Darling and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town appropriate an additional 
$55,650 from Free Cash to the 2011 Fiscal Operating Budget Street Lighting Account number 
014242-5211 for the purpose of turning the 626 street lights back on that were turned off in 
Fiscal 2010 and that the Town shall take every affirmative action to ensure that the restoration of 
the street lights be permanent. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 1 6 be amended to replace the 
words "to transfer the following funds from the free cash line item account" with the words " to 
pay for turning on the 625 street lights with funds from budget line items 2,4,6,8,10,12 and 16, 
on a pro rata basis, and applied." 

The amendment was ruled out of order by the Moderator. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate by a Majority vote. 

Article 16 was DEFEATED by a Majority Vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

The Jerry Silverman Fireworks 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will provide funding in the amount of $12,000 for the Jerry 
Silverman Fireworks Program as part of the Fourth of July festivities from available funds, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 17 was approved in the amount of $12,000 from 
Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Insurance Recovery Transfer 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $78,128.02 from the 
Insurance Proceeds in Excess of $20,000 Account and appropriate to the Municipal 
Building/Insurance Fund, said sum being the amount of insurance proceeds received on damages 
to a fire truck, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the sum of 
$78,128.02 from the Insurance Proceeds in Excess of $20,000 Account and appropriate to the 
Municipal Building/Insurance Fund, said sum being the amount of insurance proceeds received 
on damages to a fire truck, or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Overlay Surplus Transfer for Tax Abatement and Exemptions 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from Overlay Surplus 
and appropriate to various fiscal years Allowance for Abatements and Exemptions accounts, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Chief Assessor 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the sum of 
$351,404.13 from Overlay Surplus and appropriate to the following fiscal years Allowance for 
Abatements and Exemptions accounts: FY2004 - $26,323.14, FY2005 - $9,599.95 , FY2008 - 
$154,246.16 and FY2009 -$161,234.88. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Other Post Employment Benefits Trust Fund - OPEB 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 479 of the Acts 
of 2008 - An Act Providing for the Establishment of Other Post Employment Benefits Liability 
Trust Funds in Municipalities, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 20 as 
printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Funding OPEB Trust Fund 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



ARTICLE 21. To see what amount the Town will vote to transfer from Free Cash or available 
funds and appropriate to the Other Post Employment Benefit Trust Fund established under the 
provisions of Chapter 479 of the Acts of 2008, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
the sum of $100,620 from Sewer reserves and $157,500 from Free Cash and appropriate the sum 
of $258,120 to the Other Post Employment Benefit Trust Fund established under the provisions 
of Chapter 479 of the Acts of 2008 as approved under Article 20 of the 2010 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation a sum not to 
exceed $12,000 for the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and disabled 
transportation subsidy program, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town 
appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of $12,000 for the purpose of continuing to provide for 
an elderly and disabled transportation subsidy program, or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Transfer of 24 Brechin Terrace 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody and control of the 
property at 24 Brechin Terrace (Assessor's Map 54, Parcel 33) to the Conservation Commission 
pursuant to General Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C, for conservation and open space use, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 23 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Planning Board Report: Approval 

Acceptance of Stretch Energy Code 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to enact Article XII, Section 47 of the Town of 
Andover General By-Laws, entitled "Stretch Energy Code" for the purpose of regulating the 
design and construction of buildings for the effective use of energy, pursuant to Appendix 120 
AA of the Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, the "Stretch Energy Code", including 
amendments or modifications thereto, which by-law shall read as follows: 

Section 47 - STRETCH ENERGY CODE 

§ 47.1 -Definitions 
§ 47.2 - Purpose 
§ 47.3 - Applicability 
§ 47.4 - Authority 
§ 47.5 - Stretch Code 
§ 47.1 - Definitions 

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 2009 - The International Energy Conservation 
Code (IECC) is a building code created by the International Code Council. It is a model code 
adopted by many state and municipal governments in the United States for the establishment of 
minimum design and construction requirements for energy efficiency. Commencing July 1, 
2010, the baseline energy conservation requirements of the MA State Building Code will default 
to IECC 2009 and MA amendments. 

Stretch Energy Code - Codified by the Board of Building Regulations and Standards as 780 
CMR Appendix 120 AA, the Stretch Energy Code is the International Energy Conservation Code 
(IECC) 2009 with amendments contained herein. 

§ 47.2 - Purpose 

The purpose of 780 CMR 120 AA is to provide a more energy-efficient alternative to the base 
energy code applicable to the relevant sections of the building code for both new construction 
and existing buildings. 

§ 47.3 - Applicability 

This code applies to residential and commercial buildings. Buildings not included in this scope 
shall comply with 780 CMR 13, 34, 61 or 93, as applicable. 

$ 47.4 - Authority 

A municipality seeking to ensure that construction within its boundaries is designed and built 
above the energy efficiency requirements of 780 CMR may mandate adherence to this appendix. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



780 CMR 120 AA may be adopted or rescinded by any municipality in the Commonwealth in 
the manner prescribed by law. 

§ 47.5 - Stretch Code 

The Stretch Code, as codified by the Board of Building Regulations and Standards as 780 CMR 
Appendix 120 AA, including amendments or modifications, is herein incorporated by reference 
into the Town of Andover General Bylaws, Article XII, Section 47. 

The Stretch Code is enforceable by the Building Inspector. 

And further, that non-substantive changes to this by-law be permitted in order that it be in 
compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-Laws, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Andover Green Advisory Board and the Planning Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 24 printed 
in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Zoning By-law Amendment - Overlay Districts 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will amend Article VIII, Section 2.2., Overlay Districts, of 
the Zoning Bylaw, by adding Andover Smart Growth Overlay District at the end of Section 2.2., 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On the request of the Town Yard Task Force and the Planning Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 25 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Zoning By-law Amendment - Smart Growth Overlay District 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will amend Article VIII, Section 8.0 Special District 
Regulations of the Zoning Bylaw by adding the following new Section 8.7, Andover Smart 
Growth Overlay District (ASGOD), and Appendix B, map of the Andover Smart Growth 
Overlay District. The ASGOD consists of approximately 24.33 acres of land in the vicinity of 
North Main Street, Pearson Street, Essex Street and Railroad Street. 

"SECTION 8.7: ANDOVER SMART GROWTH OVERLAY DISTRICT (ASGOD) 

8.7.1 Purpose. It is the purpose of this section to establish an Andover Smart Growth Overlay 
District (ASGOD) and to encourage smart growth in accordance with the purposes of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40R, to foster a range of housing opportunities along with 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



a mixed-use development component and to be proposed in a distinctive and attractive site 
development program that promotes compact design, preservation of open space and a variety of 
transportation options, including enhanced pedestrian access to employment and nearby 
transportation systems. Other objectives of this section are to: 

1. Promote the public health, safety, and welfare by encouraging diversity of 
housing opportunities; 

2. Promote mixed use and economic development that is safe, pedestrian friendly, 
and oriented to rail transit; 

3. Increase the production of a range of housing units to meet existing and 
anticipated housing needs; 

4. Provide a mechanism by which residential development can contribute directly to 
increasing the supply and diversity of housing; 

5. Establish requirements, standards, and guidelines, and ensure predictable, fair and 
cost-effective development review and permitting; 

6. Establish development standards to allow high quality design and creative site 
planning; 

7. Enable the Town to receive Zoning Incentive Payments and/or Density Bonus 
Payments in accordance with G. L. Chapter 40R, 760 CMR 59.06, and additional 
Chapter 70 aid in accordance with G.L. Chapter 40S arising from the 
development of housing in the ASGOD. 

8.7.2 Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply. All 
capitalized terms shall be defined in accordance with the definitions established under the 
Enabling Laws or this Section 8.7. To the extent that there is any conflict between the 
definitions set forth in this section and the enabling laws, the terms of the enabling laws shall 
govern. 

Affordable Homeowner ship Unit: A dwelling unit required to be sold to an eligible household. 

Affordable Housing: Housing that is affordable to and occupied by eligible households. 

Affordable Housing Restriction: A deed restriction of affordable housing meeting statutory 
requirements in G.L. c. 184, § 31 and the requirements of Section 8.7 of this by-law. 

Affordable Rental Unit: A dwelling unit required to be rented to an eligible household. 

Applicant: The individual or entity that submits a Project for plan approval. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



As-of-right Project or Project: means a multifamily use development or a mixed use 
development allowed hereunder without recourse to a special permit, variance, zoning 
amendment, or other form of zoning relief. 

Design Standards: Standards adopted to preserve and augment the architectural qualities, 
historic character and pedestrian scale of, and which are applicable to, all development projects. 
See Section 8.7.10. 

Developable Acres: The area available for development with the ASGOD, including both 
"developable land" and "substantially developed land", as those terms are as defined in 760 
CMR 59.00. 

DHCD: The Department of Housing and Community Development of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts or any successor agency. 

Dwelling Unit: One (1) or more rooms with cooking, living, sanitary and sleeping facilities 
arranged for the use of one (1) or more persons living together as a single housekeeping unit. 

Eligible Household: An individual or household whose annual income is less than 80 percent of 
the area-wide median income as determined by the United States Department of Housing and 
Urban Development (HUD), adjusted for household size, with income computed using HUD's 
rules for attribution of income to assets. 

Enabling Laws: G.L. Chapter 40R and 760 CMR 59.00. 

Mixed Use: Any Project containing a required residential use and one (1) or more non-residential 
uses(s), the same being permitted pursuant to Section 8.7.5. 

Monitoring Agent: The local Housing Authority or other qualified housing entity designated by 
the PAA, pursuant to Section 8.7.4.6, to review and implement the affordability requirements 
affecting projects permitted under this Section 8.7. 

Multifamily Dwelling: Dwelling containing four or more dwelling units. 

Plan Approval: Standards and criteria which a project in the ASGOD must meet under the 
procedures established herein and in the enabling laws. 

Plan Approval Authority (PAA): For purposes of reviewing Project applications and issuing 
decisions on Projects within the ASGOD, the Plan Approval Authority (PAA), consistent with 
G.L. c. 40R and 760 CMR 59.00, shall be the Planning Board. The PAA is authorized to approve 
a site plan to implement a Project. 

Plan Review: The review procedure established by this Section 8.7 and administered by the Plan 
Approval Authority. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Site Plan: A plan depicting a proposed Project for all or a portion of the ASGOD and which is 
submitted to the Plan Approval Authority for its review and approval in accordance with 
provisions of this by-law. 

Structured Parking Facilities: A structure or structures constructed to provide off-street parking 
for automobiles required by the provisions of Section 8.7 in connection with the construction of a 
Project. To the greatest extent possible, structured parking facilities shall be constructed at grade 
level or sub-grade level. 

Zoning By-Law: The Zoning By-law of the Town of Andover applicable to the geographic area 
in which the ASGOD is located as said by-law may from time to time be amended. 

8.7.3 Overlay District. The ASGOD is an overlay district having a land area of approximately 
24.33 acres, as shown on a plan entitled "Figure 6: District Boundary, as prepared by the Cecil 
Group, dated December 31, 2009", that is super-imposed over the underlying zoning district(s), 
as shown on Appendix A attached hereto. This map is hereby made a part of the Zoning By-Law 
and is on file in the Office of the Town Clerk. 

1. Underlying Zoning. The ASGOD is an overlay district superimposed on all 
underlying zoning districts. The Zoning By-law governing the underlying zoning 
district(s) shall remain in full force and effect except for Projects undergoing 
development pursuant to this Section 8.7. Within the boundaries of the ASGOD a 
developer may elect to develop a project in accordance with the Smart Growth 
Zoning, or to develop a project in accordance with the requirements of the 
regulations for use, dimension and all other provisions of the Zoning By-law 
governing the underlying zoning district(s). 

2. Applicability of ASGOD. In accordance with the provisions of G.L. Chapter 40R 
and 760 CMR 59.00, an Applicant for a Project located within the ASGOD may 
seek Plan Approval in accordance with the requirements of this Section 8.7. In 
such case, then notwithstanding anything to the contrary in this Zoning By-Law, 
such Plan Approval shall not be subject to any other provisions of this Zoning By- 
Law, including limitations upon the issuance of building permits for residential 
uses related to a rate of development or phased growth limitation or to a local 
moratorium on the issuance of such permits, or to building permit or dwelling unit 
limitations. When a building permit is issued for any Project approved in 
accordance with this Section 8.7, the provisions of the underlying district(s) shall 
no longer be applicable to the land shown on the site plan which was submitted 
pursuant to Section 8.7 for such Project. 

8.7.4 Housing and Affordability. 

1 . Marketing Plan. Prior to granting Plan Approval for housing within the ASGOD, 

an Applicant for such approval must submit a narrative document, housing 
marketing plan and resident selection plan that establishes that the proposed 
development of housing is appropriate for diverse populations, including 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



households with children, other households, individuals, households including 
individuals with disabilities, and the elderly. These documents, in combination, to 
be submitted with an application for Plan Approval pursuant to Section 8.7.11 
below shall include details about construction related to the provision, within the 
Project, of units that are accessible to the disabled. The marketing plan must be 
approved by DHCD prior to the issuance of a building permit for a Project. 

2. Number of Affordable Housing Units. Not less than twenty percent (20%) of the 
total dwelling units constructed in a Project shall be Affordable Housing. For all 
Projects where the Affordable Housing units proposed are Affordable Rental 
Units, the Plan Approval Authority may require that not less than twenty five 
percent (25%) of total housing units in any building containing rental units shall 
be Affordable Housing units; provided, however, that 20% of such units may be 
affordable where restricted to households earning less than 50% of area median 
income. For purposes of calculating the number of units of Affordable Housing 
required within a Project, any fractional unit of 0.5 or greater shall be deemed to 
constitute a whole unit. 

3. Requirements. Affordable Housing shall comply with the following requirements: 

a. For an Affordable Rental Unit, the monthly rent payment, including 
utilities and parking, shall not exceed 30 percent of the maximum monthly 
income permissible for an Eligible Household, assuming a family size 
equal to the number of bedrooms in the unit plus one, unless other 
affordable program rent limits approved by the DHCD shall apply. 

b. For an Affordable Homeownership Unit, the monthly housing payment, 
including mortgage principal and interest, private mortgage insurance, 
property taxes, condominium and/or homeowner's association fees, 
insurance and parking, shall not exceed 30% of the maximum monthly 
income permissible for an Eligible Household, assuming a family size 
equal to the number of bedrooms in the unit plus one. 

c. Affordable Housing required to be offered for rent or sale shall be rented 
or sold to and occupied only by Eligible Households. 

d. The ASGOD shall not include the imposition of restrictions on age upon 
the entire District but the development of specific Projects within the 
ASGOD may be exclusively for the elderly, persons with disabilities, or 
for assisted living, provided that any such Project shall be in compliance 
with all applicable Federal, State and local fair housing laws and 
regulations and not less than 25% of the housing units in such a restricted 
project shall be restricted as Affordable Housing. 

e. At least 10% of the Affordable Housing units shall be handicapped- 
accessible. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



4. Design and Construction. Units of Affordable Housing shall be finished housing 
units. Units of Affordable Housing shall be dispersed throughout the development 
of which they are part and be comparable in initial construction, quality and 
exterior design to other housing units in the development. The total number of 
bedrooms in the Affordable Housing shall be proportionate to the total number of 
bedrooms in all the units in the Project of which the Affordable Housing is part. 

5. Affordable Housing Restriction. Each unit of Affordable Housing shall be subject 
to an Affordable Housing Restriction which is recorded with the appropriate 
Registry of Deeds or District Registry of the Land Court and prior to such 
recording has been approved by DHCD. Such Affordable Housing Restriction 
shall contain the following: 

a. Specification of the term of the Affordable Housing Restriction which 
shall be the maximum period allowed by law but not less than ninety nine 
years; 

b. The name and address of a Monitoring Agent with a designation of its 
power to monitor and enforce the Affordable Housing Restriction; 

c. A description of the Affordable Homeownership Unit, if any, by address 
and number of bedrooms; and a description of the overall quantity and 
number of bedrooms and number of bedroom types of Affordable Rental 
Units in a Project or portion of a Project which are rental. Such restriction 
shall apply individually to the specifically identified Affordable 
Homeownership Unit and shall apply to a percentage of rental units of a 
rental Project or the rental portion of a Project without specific unit 
identification; 

d. Reference to a housing marketing and resident selection plan, to which the 
Affordable Housing is subject and which includes an affirmative fair 
housing marketing program including public notice and a fair resident 
selection process. If approved by DHCD, the housing marketing and 
selection plan may provide for preferences in resident selection. For the 
affordable housing units, the plan shall designate the household size 
appropriate for a unit with respect to bedroom size and provide that the 
preference for such unit shall be given to a household of the appropriate 
size; 

e. A requirement that buyers or tenants will be selected at the initial sale or 
initial rental and upon all subsequent sales and rentals from a list of 
Eligible Households compiled in accordance with the housing marketing 
and selection plan; 



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f. Reference to the formula pursuant to which rent of a rental unit or the 
maximum resale price of a homeownership will be set; 

g. Designation of the priority of the Affordable Housing Restriction over 
other mortgages and restrictions, provided that a first mortgage of an 
Affordable Homeownership Unit to a commercial lender in an amount less 
than maximum resale price may have priority over the Affordable Housing 
Restriction if required by then current practice of commercial mortgage 
lender; 

h. A requirement that only an Eligible Household may reside in Affordable 

Housing and that notice of any lease or sublease of any unit of Affordable 
Housing shall be given to the Monitoring Agent; 

i. Provision for effective monitoring and enforcement of the terms and 

provisions of the Affordable Housing Restriction by the Monitoring 
Agent; 

j . Provision that the restriction on an Affordable Homeownership Unit shall 

run in favor of the Monitoring Agent and the Town in a form approved by 
Town Counsel and shall limit initial sale and resale to and occupancy by 
an eligible household; 

k. Provision that the restriction on Affordable Rental Units in a rental Project 

or rental portion of a Project shall run with the rental Project or rental 
portion of a Project and shall run in favor of the Monitoring Agent and the 
Town, in a form approved by Town Counsel and shall limit rental and 
occupancy to an Eligible Household; 

1. Provision that the owner(s) or manager(s) of Affordable Rental Unit(s) 

shall file an annual report to the Monitoring Agent in a form specified by 
that Agent certifying compliance with the affordability provisions of this 
by-law and containing such other information as may be reasonably 
requested in order to ensure affordability; and 

m. A requirement that residents in Affordable Housing provide such 
information as the Monitoring Agent may reasonably request in order to 
ensure affordability. 

Monitoring Agent. A Monitoring Agent which may be the Local Housing 
Authority or other qualified housing entity shall be designated by the PAA as the 
Monitoring Agent for all Affordable Housing units in a Project. In a case where 
the Monitoring Agent cannot adequately carry out its administrative duties, upon 
certification of this fact by the PAA or by DHCD, such duties shall devolve to and 
thereafter be administered by a qualified housing entity designated by the PAA or, 
in the absence of such timely designation, by an entity designated by the DHCD. 



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In any event, such Monitoring Agent shall ensure the following, both prior to 
issuance of a building permit for a Project within the ASGOD and on a continuing 
basis thereafter, as the case may be: 

a. Prices of Affordable Homeownership Units are properly computed; rental 
amounts of Affordable Rental Units are properly computed; 

b. Income eligibility of households applying for Affordable Housing is 
properly and reliably determined; 

c. The housing marketing and resident selection plan conforms to all 
requirements and is properly administered; 

d. Sales and rentals are made to Eligible Households chosen in accordance 
with the housing marketing and resident selection plan with appropriate 
unit size for each household being properly determined and proper 
preference being given; and 

e. Affordable Housing Restrictions meeting the requirements of this section 
are recorded with the proper Registry of Deeds or District Registry of the 
Land Court. 

7. Housing Marketing and Selection Plan. The housing marketing and selection plan 
shall make provision for payment by the Project Applicant of reasonable costs to 
the Monitoring Agent to develop, advertise, and maintain the list of Eligible 
Households and to monitor and enforce compliance with affordability 
requirements, as set forth in Section 8.7.4. 

8. Phasing. The PAA, as a condition of any Plan Approval, may require a Project to 
be phased in order to mitigate any extraordinary adverse Project impacts on 
nearby properties. For Projects that are approved and developed in phases, the 
PAA shall assure the required number of Affordable Housing units in the Project. 
Such assurance may be provided through use of the security devices referenced in 
G.L. c. 41, § 81U or through the PAA's withholding of certificates of occupancy 
until proportionality has been achieved. No Density Bonus Payment will be 
received by the Town until such proportionality has been achieved by the issuance 
of occupancy permits for the Affordable Housing units in the Project. 

9. Computation. Prior to the granting of any Plan Approval of a Project, the 
Applicant must demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the Monitoring Agent, that the 
method by which such affordable rents or affordable purchase prices are 
computed shall be consistent with State or Federal guidelines for affordability 
applicable to the Town. 

10. No Waiver. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary herein, the Affordability 
provisions in this Section 8.7.4 shall not be waived. 



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8.7.5 Permitted Uses 



Principal Uses. The following uses are permitted as of right in the AS GOD. All 
other uses are prohibited: 

a. Multifamily dwelling; 

b. Mixed use which shall contain a residential component at the allowed 
density; 

c. Municipal facilities; 

d. Structured Parking Facilities; and 

e. Non-residential uses within a Mixed Use Project in accordance with the 
following "Table of Non-residential Uses". 



Use 


Permissions 




Institutional Uses 




1 . Philanthropic or charitable institution 


BA 




Business and Commercial Uses 




1 . Private club not conducted for profit 


Y 


2. Personal service establishment 


Y 


3. Banking establishment 


Y 


4. Retail sales establishment 


Y 


5. Convenience store 


BA 


6. Non-exempt educational use 


Y 


7. Medical center or clinic 


Y 


8. Self-service laundry or dry-cleaning operation 


Y 


9. Restaurants 




a. Restaurant, sit down 


Y 


b. Restaurant, fast food 


Y 


10. Shop for custom work involving the manufacture of 
articles to be sold on the premises 


Y 


1 1 . Indoor commercial recreation establishment 


Y 


12. Business, professional or administrative office 


Y 


13. Motel or hotel (see Section 4.1.5.1 of the Zoning By- 
Law) 


Y 


14. Commercial parking lot or garage 


Y 


15. Major non-residential project (see Sections 9.4 and 
10.0 of the Zoning By-Law) 


PB 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Non-residential use of any building, structure or land within the ASGOD is 
prohibited except as permitted above. For the purposes of the "Table of Non- 
residential Uses", the letter "Y" shall designate that a use requires Plan Approval, 
the letters "BA" shall designate that the use requires a Special Permit from the 
Zoning Board of Appeals and the letters "PB" shall designate that the use requires 
a Special Permit from the Planning Board. 

2. Accessory Uses. Uses which are subordinate to, clearly incidental to, customary 

in connection with, and located in the same structure a Permitted Principal Use 
and which does not, in effect, constitute conversion of the Permitted Principal Use 
to a use not otherwise permitted in the ASGOD shall be permitted as of right. 

8.7.6 Density. 

1. Residential. The permissible residential density in the ASGOD is 21 Dwelling 
Units per Developable Acre. There are 16.91 Developable Acres within the 
ASGOD, distinct from "Developable Land" as defined in 760 CMR 59.00 and 

approved by DHCD on , 2010. Residential density in the 

ASGOD is capped at 254 Dwelling Units. 

2. Non-residential. The total amount of non-residential development in the ASGOD 
shall be capped at 350,000 square feet of Gross Floor Area excluding any 
Municipal Structures and Structured Parking Facility. 

3. Non-residential - Retail. No individual retail establishment shall exceed 25,000 
square feet of Gross Floor Area without specific approval of the PAA. 

4. Integration of Uses. The PAA may require the integration of residential and non- 
residential uses in a Mixed Use structure as a condition of Plan Approval. 

5. Multiple Buildings. In the ASGOD more than one building may be erected on a 
single lot. 

8.7.7 Dimensional Regulations. 

1 . First Floor. Buildings with a commercial use on the first floor shall be located 
directly behind the front sidewalk (0-foot maximum setback) on all streets. 
Regardless of the width of the existing sidewalk, a minimum of 8 feet shall be 
required from the curb line to the front of building. 

2. Height. Building heights shall conform to and be measured according to the 
standards of the Andover Zoning By-laws in effect on December 18, 2009, as 
certified by the Town Clerk on December 18, 2009 and submitted to DHCD on 
December 30, 2009, with the following exceptions: 



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a. Within a distance of 90 feet back from the property line on North Main 
Street, the maximum allowed height of all buildings in the AS GOD shall 
be 35 feet or three (3) stories, whichever is less, measured from the 
average grade of North Main Street adjacent to such building(s). 

b. After 90 feet back from the property line on North Main Street, the 
maximum allowed height shall be the maximum of 65 feet or 6 stories, 
whichever is less. 

c. On Essex Street and Pearson Street, the maximum allowed heights of 
buildings shall be 35' or two stories within 15 feet, after which allowed 
height shall be 45' within a distance of 50 feet back from the property line 
on the public street. After 50 feet, the maximum allowed height shall be 
65 feet. 

d. South of Pearson Street and when adjacent to Essex Street and Railroad 
Street, the maximum allowed heights buildings shall be 50 feet above the 
adjacent public street. 

e. When a building facade extends more than 100 feet across a grade that 
changes 10 feet or more in elevation, the maximum height shall be 
determined from the average grade across each 100 foot increment. 

f. No additional restrictions shall apply to buildings fronting on Lewis 
Street, Buxton Court or to any new roads created within the district. 

g. The height of any building in the ASGOD shall be the vertical distance 
measured from the average finished grade adjacent to said building 
(exclusive of basements) and the ceiling of the upper-most occupied space 
in the building in the case of flat roofs and in the case of buildings with 
pitched roofs, at the point at which the ceiling intersects the exterior 
portion of the building. The calculation of building height shall not apply 
to roof tanks and their supports, ventilating, air conditioning and similar 
service equipment, chimneys, railings and other similar features of 
buildings which are in no way designed for occupancy or use nor to the 
portion of a pitched roof above the intersection of the ceiling of the upper- 
most occupied space in the building. 

3. Coverage. Maximum coverage in the ASGOD shall be 75% measured as to the 
total number of Developable Acres in the ASGOD. 

4. Parcel Size. The minimum parcel size required for a Project shall be 2 acres. 
8.7.8 Performance Standards 

1 . Driveways. The number of curb cuts on State and local roads shall be minimized. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 

2. Interior Design. Projects shall assure safe interior circulation within its site by 
allowing for the separation of pedestrian, bicycle and motor vehicle traffic. 

3. Noise. Any Project in the ASGOD shall comply with 3 1 CMR 3 1 .07, as may be 
amended. 

8.7.9 Design Standards and Guidelines 

1. General. In order to establish the ASGOD's architectural and site qualities, 

Projects shall comply with the Design Standards adopted the PAA except where a 
specific waiver is granted. The PAA may also adopt Design Guidelines which are 
intended to be applied flexibly as part of the Plan Approval process. The Design 
Standards and Guidelines may address the following features of the Project: 

Architectural Elements including: 

a. Building height; 

b. Massing of buildings, building separation, building location and gateways 
to the ASGOD; 

c. Building facades; 

d. Storefront styles; 

e. Building materials and foundations; 

f. Doors and windows, primary entrances and secondary entrances; 

g. Awnings, canopies and marquees, if provided; 
h. Signage; and 

i. Historic structural or neighborhood elements, if applicable. 

Site elements including: 

a. Lighting; 

b. Grading; 

c. Landscaping along roadways, foundations and paved areas; 

d. Landscaped buffers and irrigations systems, if provided; 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 

e. Pedestrian and bicycle amenities, if provided; 

f. Sidewalks, pavement width and curb cuts; 

g. Utilities and service areas; 
h. Stormwater management; 
i. Design and construction; 

j. Surface parking and structured parking; and 

k. Project interconnection, where provided. 

2. Rules and Regulations. The PAA may adopt, by majority vote, reasonable, 
DHCD-approved Design Standards. 

3. Amendments. Any amendment to the Design Standards or the PAA's Rules and 
Regulations imposing a mandatory design requirement must be objective and not 
subjective and may only address the scale and proportions of buildings, the 
alignment, width, and grade of streets and sidewalks, the type and location of 
infrastructure, the location of building and garage entrances, off street parking, the 
protection of significant natural site features, the location and design of on-site 
open spaces, exterior signs, and buffering in relation to adjacent properties. 
DHCD may, at its discretion, require any amendment to the Design Standards or 
the PAA's Rules and Regulations to contain graphics illustrating a particular 
standard, guideline or definition in order to make such standard, guideline or 
definition clear and understandable. 

4. DHCD Approval. Before adopting any design standard or guideline, the PAA 
shall submit the proposed design standard or guideline to DHCD for approval. 
Any amendment to the Design Standards or the PAA's Rules and Regulations 
shall not take effect until approved by the DHCD and filed with the Town Clerk. 
In submitting a proposed design standard or guideline for DHCD approval, the 
PAA shall also submit sufficient documentation clearly showing that the proposed 
design standard or guideline will not add unreasonable costs to Projects or 
unreasonably impair the economic feasibility of a Project. A letter from a 
developer, property owner or other interested party indicating that the Design 
Standards or the PAA's Rules and Regulations will not add unreasonable costs or 
unreasonably impair the economic feasibility of a Project shall not constitute 
sufficient documentation. 

5. Plan Approval. An application for Plan Approval that has been submitted to the 
Town Clerk shall not be subject to any design standard or regulation that has not 
been approved by DHCD and filed with the Town Clerk. 



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8.7.10 Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations. 

1. Structured Parking Required. All parking within the ASGOD for any project 
shall be accommodated within Structured Parking Facilities located within the 
ASGOD. On-street parking may be provided on streets within the Project in front 
of and near retail stores. 

2. Off-Street Parking and Loading Requirements. Any structure that is constructed, 
enlarged, or extended, or has a change of use which affects the computation of 
parking spaces, and any use of land established, or any existing use is changed, 
parking and loading spaces shall be meet the following requirements: 

Residential uses 1 .0 space per unit 

Non-residential uses 3.0 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of gross floor 

area 

3. Allowance. The PAA may make an allowance for up to 15% reduction with 
shared parking. 

4. Computation of Spaces. When the computation of required parking or loading 
spaces results in the requirement of fractional space, any fraction over one-half 
shall require one space. 

5. Location of Loading Spaces. Any loading spaces required shall in all cases be on 
the same lot as the use they are intended to serve. In no case shall the required 
loading spaces be part of the area used to satisfy the parking requirements of this 
by-law. 

8.7.11 Application for Plan Approval 

The Plan Approval Authority shall adopt and file with the Town Clerk, the 
Administrative Rules and Regulations relative to the application requirements and 
content for Plan Review and Plan Approval. Such Administrative Rules and Regulations 
and any amendment thereto must be approved by the DHCD. The Plan Review process 
encompasses the following: 

1. Pre- Application. Prior to the submittal of a Plan Approval submission, a "Concept 

Plan" may be submitted to help guide the development of the definitive site plan 
for the proposed Project buildout and individual elements thereof. Such Concept 
Plan should reflect the following: 

a. Overall building envelope areas; 

b. Areas which shall remain undeveloped; 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



c. General site improvements, groupings of buildings and proposed land 

uses. 

The Concept Plan is intended to be used as a tool for both the Applicant and the 
PAA to ensure that the proposed Project design will be consistent with the Design 
Standards and the other requirements of the ASGOD. 

2. Application. An application for Plan Approval shall be submitted to the PAA on 
the form provided by the PAA. An application shall show the proposed buildout 
of the entire Project, whether the Project will be phased or not. 

3. Required Submittals. The application for Plan Approval shall be accompanied by 
the following plans and documents: 

a. Properly executed application form, a certified list of abutters and the 
costs of publication and notice to abutters of the public hearing on the 
application; 

b. A filing fee in an amount established by the PAA and incorporated into 
the Rules and Regulations of the PAA relative to the application 
requirements for Plan Review and Plan Approval to cover Town 
administrative costs. 

c. List of any requested waivers from the requirements of this Section 8.7, as 
limited under Section 8.7.13, including a detailed explanation/justification 
of the reason for such request. 

d. A site plan, prepared by a registered professional architect, registered civil 
engineer or a professional landscape architect, drawn at a scale of one (1) 
inch equals forty (40) feet, containing the following information: (a) date; 
(b) North arrow; (c) name and address of the owner; (d) name and address 
of the designer; (e) locus plan; (f) lot lines and setbacks; (g) adjacent 
streets and ways; (h) owners and uses of abutting lots; (i) zoning district 
boundaries; (j) wetlands and wetlands buffers, as shown on maps entitled 
"Wetlands Areas of Andover, Massachusetts" available from the 
Conservation Commission; (k) all existing and proposed topography at 
two-foot intervals; (1) all test boring sites, keyed to accompanying 
documentation of results; (m) all existing and proposed buildings, 
structures, parking and loading areas (with dimensional notations), 
driveways, walkways, signs, fences and refuse collection areas; (n) all 
existing structures and/or pavement to be removed or demolished; (o) all 
utilities, including waterline locations, sewer line locations and profiles, 
and storm drainage systems; and (p) all areas designated as easements, 
Conservation Restriction areas or open space, if applicable, and any 
provision for pedestrian/bicycle accessways connecting to adjacent open 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



space, neighborhoods, schools, recreation areas or transportation facilities 
and for alternative transit programs). 

e. A separate plan drawn at the same scale showing landscaping and lighting 
details. 

f. Written statement detailing the size of the lot(s), the proposed use, parking 
calculations, building footprint coverage and calculations of volume of 
earth to be moved and removed. 

g. For any Project, the application shall be accompanied by the following 
documents: 

(i) Evidence that the Project complies with the cost and eligibility 
requirements of Section 8.7.4; 

(ii) Project plans that demonstrate compliance with the design and 
construction standards of Section 8.7.4; and 

(iii) A form of Affordable Housing Restriction that satisfies the 
requirements of Section 8.7.4. 

The Applicant must also submit a copy of the aforementioned documents to the 
Monitor Agent at the time of Plan submission. 



8.7.12 Procedures. 



1 . Filing. An Applicant for Plan Approval shall file the application and all required 
submittals with the Town Clerk for certification of the date and time of filing, and 
shall also file forthwith twelve (12) copies of the application and the other 
required submittals with the PAA including notice of the date of filing with the 
Town Clerk. 

2. Circulation to Other Boards. Upon receipt of the application, the PAA shall 
immediately provide a copy of the application materials to the Board of 
Selectmen, Zoning Board of Appeals, Board of Health, Conservation 
Commission, Fire Rescue, Police Department, Inspector of Buildings, Department 
of Public Works, the Design Review Board, the Preservation Commission and 
other municipal officers, agencies or boards designated by the PAA for comment, 
and any such board, agency or officer shall provide any written comments within 
60 days of its receipt of a copy of the plan and application for approval. 

3. Hearing. The PAA shall hold a public hearing for which notice has been given as 
provided in G.L. Chapter 40A, Section 1 1 . The decision of the PAA shall be 
made, and a written notice of the decision filed with the Town Clerk, within 120 
days of the receipt of the application by the Town Clerk. The required time limits 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



for such action may be extended by written agreement between the Applicant and 
the PAA, with a copy of such agreement being filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk. Failure of the PAA to take action within said 120 days or extended time, if 
applicable, shall be deemed to be an approval of the application and site plan. 

Peer Review. In addition to the application fee, the Applicant shall be required to 
pay for reasonable consulting fees to provide peer review of the Plan Approval 
application, pursuant to G.L. c. 40R, §11. The amount of the peer review fees and 
the method and time of payment thereof shall be established by the PAA and be 
incorporated in the rules and regulations adopted by the PAA relative to the 
application requirements for Plan Review and Plan Approval. Such fees shall be 
held by the Town in a separate account and used only for expenses associated 
with the review of the application by outside consultants, including, but not 
limited to, attorneys, engineers, urban designers, housing consultants, planners, 
and others. Any surplus remaining after the completion of such review, including 
any interest accrued, shall be returned to the Applicant. 



8.7.13 Decision 



1. Waivers. Except where expressly prohibited herein, upon the request of the 
Applicant, the Plan Approval Authority may waive dimensional and other 
requirements of Section 8.7, including the Design Standards in the interests of 
design flexibility and overall project quality and upon a finding of consistency of 
such variation with the overall purpose and objectives of the ASGOD or if it finds 
that such waiver will allow the Project to achieve the density, affordability, mix of 
uses and/or physical character allowable under this section. 

2. Plan Review. An Application for Plan Approval shall be reviewed for consistency 
with the purpose and intent of this section and such Plan Review shall be 
construed as an as-of-right review and approval process as required by and in 
accordance with the Enabling Laws. 

3. Plan Approval. Plan Approval shall be granted by a simple majority where the 
PAA finds that: 

a. The Applicant has submitted the required fees and information as set forth 
herein or in the applicable PAA Rules and Regulations; 

b. The proposed Project and site plan meet the requirements and standards 
set forth this Section 8.7, the applicable Design Standards and the PAA's 
rules and regulations, or a waiver has been granted therefrom; 

c. Extraordinary adverse potential impacts of the Project on nearby 
properties have been adequately mitigated by means of suitable 
conditions. The PAA may attach conditions to the Plan Approval decision 
that are necessary to insure substantial compliance with this section or to 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



mitigate any extraordinary adverse impacts of the Project on nearby 
properties; and 

d. For a Project subject to the affordability requirements of this section, 

written confirmation has been provided by the Monitoring Agent that all 
requirements of this section have been satisfied, 

4. Plan Disapproval. A site plan may be disapproved only where the PAA finds that: 

a. The Applicant has not submitted the required fees and information as set 
forth herein; or 

b. The Project and site plan do not meet the requirements and standards set 
forth this Section 8.7 or a waiver has not been granted therefrom; or 

c. It is not possible to adequately mitigate significant adverse project impacts 
on nearby properties by means of suitable conditions. 

5. Form of Decision. All decisions of the PAA shall be by a majority vote of the 
members present and voting. The PAA shall issue to the Applicant a copy of its 
decision containing the name and address of the owner, identifying the land 
affected, and the plans that were the subject of the decision and certifying that a 
copy of the decision has been filed with the Town Clerk and that all plans referred 
to in the decision are on file with the PAA. If twenty (20) days have elapsed after 
the decision has been filed in the Office of the Town Clerk without an appeal 
having been filed or if such appeal, having been filed, is dismissed or denied, the 
Town Clerk shall so certify on a copy of the decision. A copy of the decision shall 
be provided to the Inspector of Buildings. A copy of the decision or application 
bearing such certification shall be recorded in the Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds and indexed in the grantor index under the name of the owner of record or 
recorded and noted on the owner's certificate of title. The fee for recording or 
registering shall be paid by the applicant. 

8.7.14 Change in Plans after Approval by PAA 

1. Minor Change. After Plan Approval, an Applicant may apply to make minor 

changes involving minor utility or building orientation adjustments, or minor 
adjustments to parking or other site details that do not affect the overall buildout 
or building envelope of the site, or provision of open space, number of housing 
units, or housing need or affordability features. Such minor changes must be 
submitted to the PAA on redlined prints of the approved plan reflecting the 
proposed change and on application forms provided by the PAA. The PAA may 
authorize such changes at any regularly scheduled meeting without the need to 
hold a public hearing. The PAA shall set forth any decision to approve or deny 
such minor change by motion and written decision, and provide a copy to the 
Applicant for filing with the Town Clerk. A copy of the decision shall be 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



provided to the Inspector of Buildings and shall be recorded at the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds. 

2. Major Change. Those changes deemed by the PAA to constitute a major change 
because of the nature of the change in relation to the prior approved plan, or 
because such change cannot be appropriately characterized as a minor change as 
described above, shall be processed by the PAA as a new application for Plan 
Approval pursuant to this section. 

8.7.15 Enforcement; Appeal. The provisions of the ASGOD shall be administered by the 
Zoning Enforcement Officer except as otherwise provided herein. Any appeal arising out of 
action by the PAA regarding an application for Plan Approval decision for a Project shall be 
governed by the applicable provisions of G. L. Chapter 40R. Any other request for enforcement 
or appeal arising under this Section shall be governed by the applicable provisions of G. L. 
Chapter 40A. 

8.7.16 Severability. If any provision of this Section 8.7 is found to be invalid by a court of 
competent jurisdiction, the remainder of Section 8.7 shall remain in full force. The invalidity of 
any provision of this Section 8.7 shall not affect the validity of the remainder of the Town's 
Zoning By-Law." 

APPENDIX A 

A. Map of the Andover Smart Growth Overlay District 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Yard Task Force and the Planning Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 26 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 



194 



AN NUALTOWMEETlNG^PSIklS^2^2^ 




The!Cecil_Group_ 

tf~piann.na ana Design 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Zoning By-law Amendment - District Boundaries 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will amend Article VIII, Section 2.3, District Boundaries, of 
the Andover Zoning Bylaw and make the appropriate changes to the zoning maps of Andover, 
Mass., to depict the Andover Smart Growth Overlay District, containing 24.33 acres of land 
more or less, as shown on a plan entitled, "Figure 6: District Boundary, as prepared by the Cecil 
Group, dated December 31, 2009", or take any other action related thereto. 

On the request of the Town Yard Task Force and the Planning Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 27 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 



Town Yard Land/Building Acquisition with Debt Exemption 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $26,000,000 to pay the 
costs of developing a new Town Yard facility including the purchase of approximately 23.299 
acres of land at 146 Dascomb Road, including approximately .4 acres in Tewksbury, as shown 
on Lot #2-1 on Plan #13564 filed with Northern Essex District Registry of Deeds and existing 
structures thereon for use as a new Town Yard facility, including the remodeling and 
reconstruction of any such existing structures and the leasing of a portion of such structures; and 
to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the foregoing land and structures thereon by gift, purchase 
or eminent domain, and to pay costs of originally equipping and furnishing the new Town Yard 
facility, and for the payment of any and all other costs incidental and related thereto; and to 
authorize the Town Manager to file a request, if necessary, to the General Court for special 
legislation to accomplish the foregoing acquisition; and that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said amount under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7(3) and 7(3a) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other 
enabling authority and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; provided, however, that no 
sums shall be borrowed or expended for this purpose unless and until the Town shall have voted 
to exclude the amounts required to be raised to repay any borrowing pursuant to this vote from 
the limitations of Chapter 59, Section 21 C of the General Laws (also known as Proposition 2/4), 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Director of Plant and Facilities and the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 28 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Town Yard Land/Building Acquisition 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $26,000,000 to pay the 
costs of developing a new Town Yard facility including the purchase of approximately 23.299 
acres of land at 146 Dascomb Road, including approximately .4 acres in Tewksbury, as shown 
on Lot #2-1 on Plan #13564 filed with Northern Essex District Registry of Deeds and existing 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



structures thereon for use as a new Town Yard facility, including the remodeling and 
reconstruction of any such existing structures and the leasing of a portion of such structures; and 
to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the foregoing land and structures thereon by gift, purchase 
or eminent domain, and to pay costs of originally equipping and furnishing the new Town Yard 
facility, and for the payment of any and all other costs incidental and related thereto; and to 
authorize the Town Manager to file a request, if necessary, to the General Court for special 
legislation to accomplish the foregoing acquisition; and that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said amount under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7(3) and 7(3 a) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other 
enabling authority and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Director of Plant and Facilities and the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 29 be WITHDRAWN from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn the meeting at 9:56 P.M., 
until Thursday, April 29, at 7:00 P.M. at the Collins Field House, Andover High School, 
Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - April 29, 2010 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed three hundred and forty-five (345) voters 
were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. by Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit forty-six (46) non-voters to the meeting and to 
escort non- voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator, presented one of the two 2010 Virginia Cole Community Service 
Award winners to Mr. Edward J. Morrissey, 1 89A Andover Street. Mr. Morrissey was born and 
raised in Andover. He is part of the greatest generation. He started the Andover Hockey League 
and coached Little League. When Andover had volunteer firefighters in the 50's and 60's, he 
was ready to serve and put himself at risk for others. 

He served for years on the Ballardvale Historic Commission and the Cornell Trust Fund 
Committee. He started at the age of 16 as an errand boy at the Post Office here in Andover, and 
retired as its Postmaster. 

A member of the Clan McPherson Bagpipe band he held the baton and led many Andover 
parades with pride, stature and dignity. 

Mr. Morrissey' s contributions to the Town are numerous and he is more than deserving of this 
recognition of his a high standard of commitment to serving our community. 



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Alex J. Vispoli, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, announced the second award to Alfred A. 
Koch, 71 Osgood Street, for his tireless efforts of community volunteerism with AVIS, the Boy 
Scouts, the Andover Historical Society, St. Roberts Bellarmine Church and the Lawrence 
History Center. 

He has served with AVIS since 1960 working on land purchases, trail and boardwalk building, 
publicity and membership over the years. 

As an Eagle Scout leader, he has helped many young scouts build upward of 30 AVIS trails, 
benches and bridges. He has been active in scouting for at least 40 years and still guides Eagle 
Scouts in St. Robert Bellarmine' s Troop 79. 

Mr. Koch's work with the Lawrence History Center revolves around his darkroom skills and 
printing old photographs of the Immigrant City to sell in the Center's Gift Shop. 

"A kind man who gets the job done with little fanfare", Mr. Koch epitomizes the spirit of the 
Virginia Cole Community Service Award. 

The Moderator announced various housekeeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the introduction of the Ombudsman, Christopher Vrountas, the use of 
Pro and Con Microphones, time limits, the location of microphones, stage participants and the 
location of voting sections. 

Fire Rescue Ambulance 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $225,000 for the purpose of 
purchasing an ambulance, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Fire Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that $225,000 is appropriated for purchasing 
an ambulance, including costs incidental or related thereto; that to meet this appropriation the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $225,000 under 
G.L. c.44, §7(9) or any other enabling authority; and that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to 
take any actions necessary or convenient to carry out this project. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



Water Main - Construction and Reconstruction 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, or transfer from available 
funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $500,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of constructing, reconstructing or replacing water mains, including, but not limited to, all 
costs associated with land acquisition by eminent domain, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that $500,000 is appropriated for 
constructing, reconstructing or replacing water mains and costs incidental or related thereto, 
including, but not limited to, costs associated with land acquisition by eminent domain; that to 
meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized 
to borrow $500,000 under G.L. c.44, §8(5) or any other enabling authority; and that the Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to take any actions necessary or convenient to carry out this project. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Sewer Main - Construction and Reconstruction 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, or transfer from available 
funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $500,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of constructing, reconstructing or replacing sewer mains, including, but not limited to, all 
costs associated with land acquisition by eminent domain, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that $500,000 is appropriated for 
constructing, reconstructing or replacing sewer mains and costs incidental or related thereto, 
including, but not limited to, all costs associated with land acquisition by eminent domain; that to 
meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized 
to borrow $500,000 under G.L. c.44, §7(1) or any other enabling authority; and that the Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to take any actions necessary or convenient to carry out this project. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Water Treatment Plant - GAC Replacement 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, or transfer from available 
funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $1,000,000 for the purpose of paying 



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costs of replacing the granular activated carbon in the filter beds at the Water Treatment Plant, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that $1,000,000 is appropriated for replacing 
the granular activated carbon in the filter beds at the Water Treatment Plant, including costs 
incidental or related thereto; that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $1,000,000 under G.L. c.44, §8(7C) or any other 
enabling authority; and that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to take any actions necessary 
or convenient to carry out this project. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Water Treatment Plant - HVAC Systems and Equipment 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the town will vote to raise by borrowing or transfer from available 
funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $250,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of replacing, equipping, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to the Water 
Treatment Plant and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that $250,000 is appropriated for replacing, 
equipping, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to the Water Treatment Plant and for 
the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; that to meet this appropriation the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $250,000 under 
G.L. c.44, §8 or any other enabling authority; and that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to 
take any actions necessary or convenient to carry out this project. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Vouth Services Seasonal Staff Account 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $50,000.00 to 
the Youth Sendees Seasonal Staff account #015421-5140 by taxation, borrowing or transfer 
from available funds, to offset a decrease in funding for the Youth Services Seasonal Staff 
budget, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Will English and others 
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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 35 from the Warrant 
by a Majority vote. 

Zoning By-law Amendment - Definitions 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section 10.0 DEFINITIONS 
of the Andover Zoning By-law by modifying the definition for "STRUCTURE" to read as 
follows: 

"STRUCTURE: Any combination by man of matter composed of parts or materials assembled 
and joined or mixed together in some definite manner or pattern at a certain location for 
whatever purpose or use, whether or not affixed to the land. "Structure" shall include, but not be 
limited to, swimming pools, tennis courts, sports courts and courts for athletic and recreational 
activity and the equipment and paraphernalia associated with any such court but shall not include 
fences, garden walls and paved areas used solely for vehicular or pedestrian access or both." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Inspector of Buildings 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 36 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Land Transfer - Town and AVIS 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept from the Andover Village Improvement 
Society (AVIS) certain parcels of land described herein and to convey to AVIS certain parcels of 
land also described herein, and to authorize the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to petition 
the General Court for Special Legislation, notwithstanding General Laws Chapter 3 OB, Chapter 41 
or any general or special law to the contrary, authorizing said conveyances providing that the 
General Court may reasonably vary the form and substance of the requested legislation within the 
scope of the general public objectives of the petition: 

Land to be conveyed to the Town: 

The following parcels of land in the Town of Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, for 
general municipal purposes, being shown as follows: Assessors' Map 148, Parcels 7, 8, 9, 10A, 11, 
11 A, 12 A, 13 and paper streets contained therein for a total of approximately 16.21 acres, a portion 
of Assessors' Map 171, Parcel 1, which portion is shown as Parcel A containing approximately 5.2 
acres on a plan titled "Plan of Land located in Andover, Massachusetts, prepared for Town of 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Andover and Camp Dresser & McKee Inc.," dated March 9, 2010 by Richard F. Kamiski and 
Associates Inc. The Andover Planning Board may endorse said Plan as Approval Not Required. 
Total of land conveyed to the Town of Andover is approximately 21.41 acres. It is the intent that at 
some future Town Meeting, it would be requested that this land be transferred to the care, custody 
and control of the Conservation Commission. 

Land to be conveyed to the Andover Village Improvement Society (AVIS): 

The following parcels of land in the Town of Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, being 
shown as follows: Assessors' Map 207, Parcels 57 and 58 for a total of approximately 2.01 acres, 
Assessors' Map 5, Parcel 92 containing approximately 0.33 acres, and Assessors' Map 94, Parcel 
1A (except a portion of the parcel described as Parcel D in the Order of Taking recorded at Essex 
North Registry of Deeds in Book 863, Page 237 containing 0.18 acres as shown on Plan 3561, 
bounded 100 feet by the southerly line of Andover Street, 72 feet by land of Sidney P. White, 100 
feet by the Boston & Maine Railroad Right of Way and 82.5 feet by land of James F. and Kathleen 
Townsend) containing approximately 10.93 acres. The total of land conveyed to AVIS is 
approximately 13.27 acres. 

Conditions: 



1. These conveyances to AVIS shall be subject to a permanent Conservation Restriction as 
approved by the Executive Office of Environmental and Energy Affairs. 

2. The Town of Andover will retain the right to develop a well on Map 94, Parcel 1A and 
AVIS will grant access and utility easements over said parcel to develop the well. 

3. No financial consideration is to be paid by either party to accomplish these conveyances. 

Said conveyances are to be free and clear of all encumbrances, except as indicated above but 
may be subject to such existing utility easements, restrictions and other easements and rights as are 
acceptable to AVIS and the Board of Selectmen, and subject to such terms and conditions as the 
Selectmen deem advisable in the interest of the Town of Andover, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 37 was APPROVED as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 278 No: A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



Wetlands Protection By-law Amendment - Notice and Hearings 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wetlands Protection By-law, Article 
XIV, Section 6., Notice and Hearings, by adding the words "or by certificates of mailing 
confirmed by the United States Postal Service" as follows: 

"Section 6. Notice and hearings. 

Any person filing a permit application or a Request for Determination with the Commission at 
the same time shall give written notice thereof, by certified mail (return receipt requested), hand 
delivered or by certificates of mailing confirmed by the United States Postal Sendee, to all 
abutters at their mailing addresses shown on the most recent applicable tax list of the Assessors. 
The notice to abutters shall enclose a copy of the permit application or request, with plans, or 
shall state where copies may be examined and obtained by abutters. An affidavit of the person 
providing such notice, with a copy of the notice mailed or delivered, shall be filed with the 
Commission. When a person requesting a determination is other than the owner, the request, the 
notice of the hearing and the Determination itself shall be sent by the Commission to the owner 
as well as to the person making the request." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 38 was APPROVED as printed in the Warrant by 
a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission: Approval 

Wetlands Protection By-law Amendment - Consultant Fees 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wetlands Protection By-law, Article 
XIV, Section 5, Fees, by deleting Section 5(b) in its entirety and replacing it with the following: 

"(b) Consultant fees. Pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53 G and 
any rules and regulations thereunder, the Commission is authorized to require the 
applicant to pay the reasonable costs and expenses borne by the Commission for specific 
expert engineering and consulting services deemed necessary by the Commission to 
review any application. 

The Commission may also impose fees when requested to make a determination of the 
boundary line of any resource area to be performed by an agent for the Commission 
pursuant to a Request for Determination of Applicability, Notice of Intent or Abbreviated 
Notice of Resource Area Delineation relative to any wetlands boundary exceeding 250 
linear feet." 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 29. 2010 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 39 was APPROMED as printed in the Warrant by 
a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Co m mission: Approval 



DPW Vehicles 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of S252.000 for the purpose of 
purchasing Public Works vehicles, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and seconded it was voted that SI 26.000 is appropriated for purchasing 
Public Works vehicles; that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow S126.000 under G.L. c.44, §7(9) or any other 
enabling authority; and that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to take any actions necessary 
or convenient to cany" out this project. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2 3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Building Maintenance and Renovation 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $2,525,000 for the purpose of 
paying costs of constructing, adding to. remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary 
repairs to and equipping various School buildings and roofs and for the payment of all other 
costs incidental and related, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Director of Plant and Facilities 

Upon motion made and seconded it was moved that S2. 525, 000 is appropriated for constructing, 
adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to and equipping various 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



School buildings and roofs and for the payment of all other costs incidental or related thereto; 
that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow $2,525,000 under G.L. c.44, §7(3A) or any other enabling authority; and 
that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to take any actions necessary or convenient to carry out 
this project. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 41 to add at the end, "If 
Andover is successful in its litigation regarding the roof repairing, the amount paid in taxes by 
the Town's taxpayers will be rebated to the Town's taxpayers within 120 days of the receipt of 
the court award". 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was APPROVED 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Town Building Maintenance and Renovation 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $465,000 for the purpose of 
paying costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary 
repairs to and equipping various Town buildings and roofs and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Director of Plant and Facilities 

Upon motion made and seconded it was VOTED that $163,000 is appropriated for constructing, 
adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to and equipping various 
Town buildings and roofs and for the payment of all other costs incidental or related thereto; that 
to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow $163,000 under G.L. c.44, §7(3 A); and that the Board of Selectmen is 
authorized to take any actions necessary or convenient to carry out this project. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Discontinuance of a Portion of Cassimere Street 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue the following described portions of 
Cassimere Street which were accepted by the Town as a public way by vote of the Town on 
Article 48 of the 1954 Annual Town Meeting and shown on plan of land entitled "Subdivision 
Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. entitled Cassimere Street," dated February 18, 2000, Rev. 
February 14, 2001, drawn by Merrimack Engineering Services, and recorded with North Essex 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 14187: 

Lot A 

Beginning at a point on the westerly side of Cassimere Street which lies S32-25'- 

30"W a distance of 45.00 feet from a stone bound, 

Thence running S32-25'-30"W along the westerly side of Cassimere Street for a 

distance of 67.09 feet to a point, 

Thence turning and running along a curve to the left having a radius of 25.00 feet 

for a distance of 32.03 feet to a point, 

Thence turning and running along a curve to the right having a radius of 45.00 

feet for a distance of 57.66 feet, 

Thence turning and running S57-34'-30"E for a distance of 50.00 feet to the point 

of beginning. 

LotB 

Beginning at a stone bound on the westerly side of Cassimere Street, 

Thence running S32-25'-30W along the westerly side of Cassimere Street for a 

distance of 45.00 feet to a point, 

Thence turning and running N57-34"-30"W for a distance of 50.00 feet to a point, 

Thence turning a running along a curve to the right having a radius of 45.00 feet 

for a distance 70.69 feet to a point, 

Thence turning and running S57-34'-30E for a distance of 5.00 feet to the point of 

beginning. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 43 as 
printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Order of Taking - Cassimere Street 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
eminent domain, gift, purchase or otherwise, any fee, easement, or other interest in the following 
described roadway, known as Cassimere Street, which was accepted by the Town as a public 
way by vote of the Town on Article 48 of the 1954 Annual Town Meeting, and to award no 
damages for said eminent domain taking: 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Beginning at a stone bound on the northerly side of Stevens Street at the 

intersection of a stone wall on the westerly side of Cassimere Street, 

Thence running N2-57'-20"E along the stone wall for a distance of 98.72 feet to a 

stone bound, 

Thence turning and running N6-25'-30"E along the stone wall for a distance of 

1 19.01 feet to a stone bound, 

Thence turning and running N32-25'-30"E for a distance of 149.02 feet to a stone 

bound, 

Thence continuing N32-25'-30E for a distance 1 12.09 feet to a stone bound, 

Thence turning and running S57-34'-30"E for a distance of 40.00 feet to a stone 

bound, 

Thence turning and running S32-25'-30"W for a distance of 237.05 feet to stone 

bound, 

Thence turning and running along a curve to the left having a radius of 36.40 feet 

for a distance of 17.08 feet to a stone bound, 

Thence turning and running S5-32'-30"W for a distance of 127.92 feet to a stone 

bound, 

Thence turning and running a long a curve to the left having a radius of 25.00 feet 

for a distance of 54.67 feet to a stone bound on the northerly side of Stevens 

Street, 

Thence turning and running S60-14'-30"W along the northerly side of Stevens 

Street for a distance of 97.36 feet to the point of beginning. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 44 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Street Acceptances 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way any or all of the 
following streets: Cassimere Street and Woodman Ridge Road as further described below: 

Cassimere Street, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled, 
"SUBDIVISION PLAN OF LAND IN ANDOVER, MASS. ENTITILED CASSIMERE 
STREET", dated February 14, 2001 (revised) and recorded in the Essex North District 
Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 14187; 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Woodman Ridge Road, as shown on plan approved by the Andover Planning Board 
entitled, "SUBDIVISION PLAN OF LAND IN ANDOVER, MASS. ENTITLED 
WOODMAN RIDGE", dated February 16, 1995 (revised) and recorded in the Essex 
North Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 13957 and further modified on plan entitled 
"SUBDIVISION PLAN OF LAND IN ANDOVER, MASS. ENTITLED WOODMAN 
RIDGE", dated November 9, 2004 (revised). 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 45 as 
printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Sewer Line Extension - Lincoln Street 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $225,000 for the 
extension of a- sanitary sewer line, including costs incidental and related thereto, on Lincoln 
Street and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, 
purchase or eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7(1) of the General By-laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes 
of the town therefore; sewer betters are to be assessed by the Board of Selectmen, acting in its 
capacity as Sewer Commissioners, based upon the Uniform Unit Method, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On petition of Tim Lindblad and others 

Upon motion made and seconded it was VOTED that $225,000 is appropriated for the extension of a 
sanitary sewer line, including costs incidental or related thereto, on Lincoln Street; that the Board 
of Selectmen are authorized to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent 
domain; that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to borrow $225,000 under G.L. c.44, §7(1) or any other enabling 
authority; further, that the Board of Selectmen, acting in its capacity as Sewer Commissioners is 
authorized to assess sewer betterments to those property owners abutting the improvements to be 
made in accordance with this vote, based upon the Uniform Unit Method; and that the Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to take any actions necessary to carry out this project. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Board of Health Report: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Sign By-law Amendment - Signs in the General Business (GB) District 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section 5.2.9.1. by deleting 
the text in a. through e. in its entirety and replacing it with the following: 

"a. The sign may be either attached flat against the wall or placed on an awning or fixed 
canopy of the building. 

b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet of the 
building to which it is attached. 

c. The sign area of a flat attached sign for any individual commercial or business use shall 
not exceed fifteen (15) percent of the portion of the facade associated with that use. 

d. Flat attached signs oriented to the street shall not exceed fifty (50) SF in area. 

e. Flat attached signs oriented to a parking lot shall not exceed twenty-five (25) SF in area 
unless they mark the primary entrance to a building or establishment, in which case the 
sign area shall not exceed fifty (50) square feet. 

f. Attached signs displayed on the body of awnings or canopies shall not exceed twenty 
percent (20%) of the area of the awning or canopy, and in no case shall they exceed 
twenty-five (25) square feet. 

g. Lettering on the valance of an awning shall not exceed 4.5 inches." 

Section 5.2.10.1. by deleting the text in a. through c. in its entirety and replacing it with the 
following: 

"a. The sign may be either attached flat against the wall or placed on an awning or fixed 
canopy of the building. 

b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet of the 
building to which it is attached. 

c. The sign area of a flat attached sign for any individual commercial or business use shall 
not exceed ten percent (10%) of the portion of the facade associated with that use and in 
no case shall the sign area exceed eighty (80) square feet. 

d. Attached signs displayed on the body of awnings or canopies shall not exceed twenty 
percent (20%) of the area of the awning or canopy, and in no case shall they exceed 
twenty-five (25) square feet. 

e. Lettering on the valance of an awning shall not exceed 4.5 inches." 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Design Review Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 47 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved amend Article 47 by deleting sections 
5.2.14.2b and Section 5.2.3.4 of the Article. 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

The amended motion was APPROVED. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Sign By-law Amendment - Signs in Office Park Districts (OP), Limited Service Districts 
(LS) and Industrial District (ID) 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section 5.2.11. of the 
Andover Zoning By-law by deleting the text in 2. and 3. In its entirety and replacing it with the 
following: 

"2. In addition to the above, one (1) attached sign for each street upon which a building or 
complex has frontage. The sign may be either attached flat against the wall or placed on 
an awning or fixed canopy of the building. No portion of the sign shall extend above the 
highest point of the roof or parapet of the building to which it is attached. The sign area 
of a flat attached sign shall not exceed twenty-five (25) square feet. Attached signs 
displayed on the body of awnings or canopies shall not exceed twenty percent (20%) of 
the area of the awning or canopy, and in no case shall they exceed twenty-five (25) 
square feet. Lettering on the valance of an awning shall not exceed 4.5 inches. 

3. In addition to the above, each business or tenant shall be limited to one sign (attached or 

projecting) for each street and parking lot on which the business or tenant has an 
entryway. The sign area shall not exceed three (3) square feet." 

Section 5.2.12. by deleting the text in 1., a. and b. in its entirety and replacing it with the 
following: 



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"1. One sign attached flat against the wall or placed on an awning or fixed canopy of the 
building, identifying the name of the firm and/or goods and services available or 
produced on the premises, subject to the following conditions: 

a. The sign area of a flat attached sign shall not exceed twenty percent (20%) of the 
area of the side of the building to which it is attached, or eighty (80) square feet, 
whichever is less. Attached signs displayed on the body of awnings or canopies 
shall not exceed twenty percent (20%) of the area of the awning or canopy, and in 
no case shall they exceed twenty-five (25) square feet. Lettering on the valance 
of an awning shall not exceed 4.5 inches. 

b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet 
of the building to which it is attached." 

Section 5.2.13. by deleting the text in 1., a. and b. in its entirety and replacing it with the 
following: 

"1. One or more signs attached flat against the wall or placed on an awning or fixed canopy 
of a building, identifying the name of the firm and/or the goods and services available or 
produced on the premises, subject to the following conditions: 

a. The total area of all such signs on a building shall not exceed twenty percent 
(20%>) of the area of the side of the building to which they are attached, or two 
hundred (200) square feet, whichever is less. Attached signs displayed on the 
body of awnings or canopies shall not exceed twenty percent (20%) of the area of 
the awning or canopy, and in no case shall they exceed twenty-five (25) square 
feet. Lettering on the valance of an awning shall not exceed 4.5 inches. 

b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet 
of the building to which it is attached." 

Section 5.2.14 by deleting the text in 1., a. and b. in its entirety and replacing it with the 
following: 

"1. One or more signs attached flat against the wall or placed on an awning or fixed canopy 
of a building, identifying the name of the firm and/or the goods and services available or 
produced on the premises, subject to the following conditions: 

a. The total area of all such signs on a building shall not exceed ten percent (1 0%>) of 

the area of the side of the building to which they are attached, or two hundred 
(200) square feet, whichever is less. Attached signs displayed on the body of 
awnings or canopies shall not exceed twenty percent (20%) of the area of the 
awning or canopy, and in no case shall they exceed twenty-five (25) square feet. 
Lettering on the valance of an awning shall not exceed 4.5 inches. 



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b. No portion of the sign shall extend above the highest point of the roof or parapet 
of the building to which it is attached." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Design Review Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 48 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



Sign By-law Amendment - Housekeeping 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section 5.2.4. Lb. of the 
Andover Zoning By-law, by deleting the following text: "The Design Review Board (DRB) 
shall, within thirty (30) days of submission, review applications for all signs in the General 
Business (GB) and Mixed Use (MU) Districts, as well as all municipal signs equal to or greater 
than four (4) square feet in area, prior to issuance of a sign permit." and replacing it with the 
following: 

"Prior to the issuance of a sign permit, the Design Review Board (DRB) shall, within 30 days of 
submission of an application for a sign permit, review an application for: (a) a municipal sign in 
any district; and (b) a sign greater than four (4) square feet in the General Business (GB) and 
Mixed Use (MU) Districts." 

Section 5.2.10.3. by inserting the following text: 

"5.2. 10. 3. c. The bottom of a projecting sign shall be at least eight (8) feet above the ground, and 
the top of the sign shall be no more than twenty-five (25) feet from the ground." 

Section 5.2.14.2.b. by deleting the text, "No part of any such sign shall be more than six (6) feet 
above ground level" and replacing it with: 

"No part of any such sign shall be more than twelve (12) feet above ground level." 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Section 5.2.3.4. by deleting the text: "b. Any nonconforming sign and/or support structure shall 
be removed within thirty (30) days of a change in use or termination of activities on the 
premises." and replacing it with: 

"b. Any sign associated with a business that has terminated activities loses its relevance and 
therefore becomes nonconforming, c. Any nonconforming sign and/or support structure shall be 
removed within thirty (30) days of a change in use or termination of activities on the premises." 

Section 5.2.2.5. by deleting the text: "Attached Sign: A sign attached parallel to the facade of a 
building, facing in the same direction as the facade" and replacing it with: 

"Attached Sign: A sign that is either attached parallel to the facade of a building, facing in the 
same direction as the facade, or displayed on the fixed canopy or awning of a building." 

Inserting a new section as follows: 

"Section 5.2.2.14. Awning: A fixed or retractable structure, whether made of canvas, plastic, 
metal or other material, placed over a storefront, door or window. For the purpose of this 
Section 5.2. Signs, awnings shall not be considered a sign. Lettering, symbols or graphic 
elements appearing on either the body or the valance of an awning (and not otherwise exempt) 
shall constitute an Attached Sign. The area of a sign displayed on an awning consists of the area 
encompassed by any lettering, symbols, or graphic elements distinct from the awning 
background color." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Design Review Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 49 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Parking Meters and Pay and Display Units 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $60,000 from the Off-Street 
Parking Meter reserve account and appropriate the sum of $60,000 for the purpose of installing 
and/or replacing parking meters and pay and display units including costs incidental and related 
thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Police Chief 

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Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 50 from the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Wood Memorial Park Restoration - Phase II 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $75,000 from the Wood 
Memorial Trust Fund and appropriate the sum of $75,000 for the purpose of continuing the fence 
and tree restoration project including costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Director of Plant and Facilities 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
the sum of $75,000 from the Wood Memorial Trust Fund and appropriate the sum of $75,000 for 
the purpose of continuing the fence and tree restoration project including costs incidental and 
related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Acquisition of 3 Blanchard Street 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $400,000 for the 
acquisition, and for costs related to such acquisition, of the land with the buildings thereon and 
demolition of the buildings thereon at 3 Blanchard Street, containing 1 .04 acres, more or less, as 
shown on Assessors Map 199, Parcel 7, and described in the deed recorded at Book 5471, Page 
243 at the North Essex Registry of Deeds and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
such land with the buildings thereon, by gift, option, lease, purchase or eminent domain, upon 
terms and conditions deemed by the Board of Selectmen to be in the best interest of the Town, 
and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow said sum pursuant to Chapter 44 of the General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town DISAPPROVE Article 52 
as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 52 WAS DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 135 NO: 143 A 2/3 vote required 



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The Town Moderator paused the meeting to allow Annie Gilbert, School Committee member, to 
present former School Committee member, Debra Silberstein, with a recognition award for her 
completed term of office on the Board. 

Sale of Buildings at 3 Blanchard Street 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody and control of the 
buildings situated on the property at 3 Blanchard Street to the Board of Selectmen for the 
purpose of removing the buildings and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to remove the 
buildings from the property, either by the sale or conveyance of the buildings on terms and 
conditions they deem to be in the best interest of the Town, even if the Town receives no 
financial payment or by demolition of the buildings, if the Board of Selectmen determines that 
demolition of the buildings is in the best interest of the Town, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 53 from the Warrant 
by a Majority vote. 

Zoning By-law Amendment - Height of Municipal/Educational Buildings 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law, Article VIII, 
Section 4.1.3.3.b., by deleting "forty feet" and replacing it with "forty-five feet" as follows: 

"b. Buildings in any residence district or the Apartment District used for municipal or 
educational purposes may be three stories in height but not in excess of forty-five feet." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Director of Plant and Facilities 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 54 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Conservation Land Acquisition Fund 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $480,000 for the 
acquisition of land near Fosters Pond as shown on Assessors Map 123, parcels 26 and 27, for 
conservation and open space purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, and for expenses incidental and related thereto, and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission to acquire this land by gift, purchase or 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



eminent domain, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7(3) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefore or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that $480,000 is appropriated for the 
acquisition of land near Fosters Pond as shown on Assessors Map 123, parcels 26 and 27, for 
conservation and open space purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, and for expenses incidental or related thereto; that to meet this 
appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow 
$480,000 under G.L. c.44, §7(3) or any other enabling authority; and that the Board of Selectmen 
is authorized to take any actions necessary or convenient to carry out this project. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission Report: Approval 

Zoning By-law Amendment - Mixed Use District 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section 7.2.2.2., Mixed Use 
District, of the Andover Zoning By-law, by deleting the following text, "The Planning Board 
may, in its discretion, according to the characteristics of any particular lot, require less than the 
maximum allowable density." and replacing it with the following: 

"The Planning Board may, in its discretion, according to the characteristics of any particular 
lot, allow less than the 3,000 square feet of lot area per dwelling unit." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On the request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 56 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 29, 2010 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel, Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded, it was voted by a 
Majority vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 9:25 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Acting Town Clerk 



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SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 6, 2010 

WARRANT DESCRIPTION ACTION 

ARTICLE NO . TAKEN 

1 . Purchase 3 Blanchard Street Approval 

2. Grant Application for Fosters Pond Conservation Land Approval 

3. Bancroft Elementary School Approval 

4. Easement from Town to the School Dept. - Bancroft School Approval 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT - December 6, 2010 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, on November 1, 2010, notifying and warning 
the Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in the Town Affairs to meet and assemble 
at the J. Everett Collins Center at Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

Monday December 6, 2010 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town 
Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are 
usually posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been posted 
and published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 
Constable 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING December 6, 2010 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed eight hundred and eighty five (885) voters 
were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. by Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silence for all those residents that have passed since the 
last Annual Town Meeting. 

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag was led by Alex J. Vispoli, Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen. 



218 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 6, 2010 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit non-voters to the meeting and to escort non-voters 
to the non- voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced various house keeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the order of speakers for the meeting, the location of microphones for pro 
and con positions, stage participants and the location of voting sections. 

The Moderator took a vote of the meeting members to limit presentations to five minutes and 
speakers to three minutes. The vote passed by a Majority vote. 

The Moderator explained the role of the Ombudsman at the meeting and reminded voters that the 
Ombudsman would help them with questions on Town Meeting procedures and amendments to 
articles. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

Purchase of 3 Blanchard Street 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $350,000 for the 
acquisition and for costs related to such acquisition of the land with the buildings thereon and 
demolition of the buildings thereon at 3 Blanchard Street containing 1.08 acres, more or less, as 
shown on Assessors' Map 199, Parcel 7 and described in the deed recorded in Book 5471, Page 
243 at the North Essex Registry of Deeds and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
such land with the buildings thereon by gift, option, lease, purchase or eminent domain, upon 
terms and conditions deemed by the Board of Selectmen to be in the best interest of the Town, 
and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Trustees, is 
authorized to borrow said sum pursuant to Chapter 44 of the General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On petition of Carl Grygiel and others 

A motion to postpone indefinitely was ruled out of order by the Moderator. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $290,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of acquiring the land located at 3 Blanchard Street containing 1 .08 
acres, more or less, as shown on Assessors' Map 199, Parcel 7 and described in the deed 
recorded in Book 5471, Page 243 at the North Essex Registry of Deeds, and for the payment of 
all other costs incidental and related thereto; that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to acquire 
such land by gift, option, lease, purchase or eminent domain, upon terms and conditions deemed 
by the Board of Selectmen to be in the best interest of the Town, including, but not limited to, the 
condition that all buildings and structures shall be removed prior to sale and the property shall be 



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SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 6, 2010 

inspected prior to and following the demolition of the buildings and structures to ensure the 
property is left in a state acceptable for use by the Town as part of the new Blanchard Field 
project and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General 
Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 



VOTE: The Moderator, after a standing count, announced that the motion passed by a 
vote of 612 in favor to 180 opposed. A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen: Recommend Approval 
Finance Committee: Recommend Approval 
Planning Board: Recommend Approval 

Grant Application for Fosters Pond Conservation Land 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer to expend up to $480,000 
from the amount appropriated by vote upon Article 55 of the 2010 Annual Town Meeting to 
acquire the land near Fosters Pond as shown on Assessors' Map 123, Parcels 26 and 27, known 
as 30 and 32 Willard Circle, and shown as Lot G, Lot F, and the .41 acre parcel shown as "Now 
or Formerly of Rathburn" on Plan of Land entitled "Plan of Land in Andover & Wilmington, 
Mass. as surveyed for Fosters Pond Improvement Assoc, Inc." dated June, 1950 and recorded 
with North Essex District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 2448, for conservation and open space 
purposes under the care, custody and control of the Andover Conservation Commission under 
the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, and that the Town 
Manager be authorized to file on behalf of the Town of Andover any and all applications deemed 
necessary under the Self-Help Act (Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 132A, s. 11) or any 
other applications for funds in any way connected with the scope of this acquisition, and that the 
Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen and the Conservation Commission be authorized to 
enter into all agreements and execute any and all instruments, including permanent deed or 
conservation restrictions, in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 1 84, on terms 
and conditions they deem to be in the best interest of the Town and as may be necessary on 
behalf of the Town of Andover to affect said purchase, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 2 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

VOTE: The Moderator declared the motion passed by Unanimous vote of the Town. 
A Majority vote required 

Selectmen: Recommend Approval 
Finance Committee: Recommend Approval 
Planning Board: Recommend Approval 



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SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 6, 2010 



Bancroft Elementary School 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, borrow or transfer from available 
funds, a sum of money to be expended under the direction of the School Building Committee for 
the construction of a new K to five 680 student Bancroft Elementary School (approximately 
99,949 square feet) located at 15 & 21 Bancroft Road, Andover, MA and as shown on Andover 
Assessor's Map 59, Lots 29 and 29A, including offsite improvements that are part of the project 
and which school facility shall have an anticipated useful life as an educational facility for the 
instruction of school children of at least 50 years, and for which the Town may be eligible for a 
school construction grant from the Massachusetts School Building Authority ("MSBA"). The 
MSBA's grant program is a non-entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as 
determined by the MSBA, and any project costs the Town incurs in excess of any grant approved 
by and received from the MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town. Any grant that the 
Town may receive from the MSBA for the Project shall not exceed the lesser of: (1) 45 percent 
(45%) of eligible, approved project costs as determined by the MSBA; or (2) the total maximum 
grant amount determined by the MSBA; provided that any appropriation hereunder shall be 
subject to and contingent upon an affirmative vote of the Town to exempt the amounts required 
for the payment of interest and principal on said borrowing from the limitations on taxes 
imposed by M.G.L. Chapter 59, Section 21C (Proposition 2!4); and that the amount of borrowing 
authorized pursuant to this vote shall be reduced by any grant amount set forth in the Project 
Funding Agreement that may be executed between the Town and the MSBA, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the School Building Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of forty 
three million eight hundred and thirty five thousand ($43,835,000) dollars for the design and 
construction of a new 680 student K-5 Bancroft Elementary School (approximately 106,486 
square feet) on Bancroft Road including offsite improvements that are part of the project to be 
constructed pursuant to a construction contract procured in accordance with the provisions of 
M.G.L. Chapter 149, or a contract utilizing construction management at risk delivery method in 
accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 149A, as determined by the School Building 
Committee and which school facility shall have an anticipated useful life as an educational 
facility for the instruction of school children for at least 50 years said sum to be expended under 
the direction of the School Building Committee, and to meet said appropriation the Treasurer is 
authorized to borrow said sum under M.G.L. Chapter 44, or any other enabling authority; that the 
Town acknowledges that the Massachusetts School Building Authority's ("MSBA") grant 
program is a non-entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as determined by the MSBA, 
and any project costs the Town incurs in excess of any grant approved by and received from the 
MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town; provided further that any grant that the Town 
may receive from the MSBA for the Project shall not exceed the lesser of (1) 44 percent (%) of 
eligible, approved project costs, as determined by the MSBA, or (2) the total maximum grant 
amount determined by the MSBA; provided that any appropriation hereunder shall be subject to 
and contingent upon an affirmative vote of the Town to exempt the amounts required for the 
payment of interest and principal on said borrowing from the limitations on taxes imposed by 
M.G.L. Chapter 59, Section 21C (Proposition 2 V?)\ and that the amount of borrowing authorized 



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SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 6, 2010 



pursuant to this vote shall be reduced by any grant amount set forth in the Project Funding 
Agreement that may be executed between the Town and the MSBA. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required. 

Selectmen: Recommend Approval 
Finance Committee: Recommend Approval 
Planning Board: Recommend Approval 
School Committee: Recommend Approval 

Easement from Town to the School Department - Bancroft Elementary School 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody and control of a portion 
of the land shown on Assessors' Map 59, Lot 29 to the Board of Selectmen for the purpose of 
granting an easement to the School Department for use of said portion of land by the School 
Department for access, parking, off-site improvements and other uses associated with the 
Bancroft Elementary School and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant an easement to the 
School Department for such purposes on terms and conditions they deem to be in the best 
interest of the Town. The proposed easement area is shown as "Limits of Easement" on Plan of 
Land entitled "Town of Andover Easement to Bancroft School Site" drawn by Dana F. Perkins, 
Inc., dated October 21, 2010. The metes and bounds of the easement area, the final easement 
plan and the terms and conditions of the easement shall be determined by the Board of 
Selectmen, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the School Building Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 4 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen: Recommend Approval 
Finance Committee: Recommend Approval 
Planning Board: Recommend Approval 
School Committee: Recommend Approval 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a 
Majority vote to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 9:05 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



Lawrence J. Murphy 
Town Clerk 



222